26 Works

Data from: A Silurian short-great-appendage arthropod

Derek J. Siveter, Derek E. G. Briggs, David J. Siveter, Mark D. Sutton, David J. Legg, Sarah Joomun & D. Legg
A new arthropod, Enalikter aphson gen. et sp. nov., is described from the Silurian (Wenlock Series) Herefordshire Lagerstätte of the UK. It belongs to the Megacheira (=short-great-appendage group), which is recognized here, for the first time, in strata younger than mid-Cambrian age. Discovery of this new Silurian taxon allows us to identify a Devonian megacheiran representative, Bundenbachiellus giganteus from the Hunsrück Slate of Germany. The phylogenetic position of megacheirans is controversial: they have been interpreted...

Data from: Nymphalid eyespot serial homologs originate as a few individualized modules

Jeffrey C. Oliver, Jeremy M. Beaulieu, Lawrence F. Gall, William H. Piel & Antónia Monteiro
Serial homologues are repeated traits that share similar development but occur in different parts of the body. Variation in number of repeats accounts for substantial diversity in animal form and considerable work has focused on identifying the factors accounting for this variation. Little is known, however, about how serial homologues originally become repeated, or about the relative timing of repeat individuation relative to repeat origin. Here, we show that the serially repeated eyespots on nymphalid...

Data from: Intraspecific phenotypic variation among alewife populations drives parallel phenotypic shifts in bluegill

Magnus Huss, Jennifer G. Howeth, Julia I. Osterman & David M. Post
Evolutionary diversification within consumer species may generate selection on local ecological communities, affecting prey community structure. However, the extent to which this niche construction can propagate across food webs and shape trait variation in competing species is unknown. Here, we tested whether niche construction by different life-history variants of the planktivorous fish alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) can drive phenotypic divergence and resource use in the competing species bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). Using a combination of common garden...

Data from: Lineage fusion in Galápagos giant tortoises

Ryan C. Garrick, Edgar Benavides, Michael A. Russello, Chaz Hyseni, Danielle L. Edwards, James P. Gibbs, Washington Tapia, Claudio Ciofi & Adalgisa Caccone
Although many classic radiations on islands are thought to be the result of repeated lineage splitting, the role of past fusion is rarely known because during these events, purebreds are rapidly replaced by a swarm of admixed individuals. Here we capture lineage fusion in action in a Galápagos giant tortoise species, Chelonoidis becki, from Wolf Volcano (Isabela Island). The long generation time of Galápagos tortoises and dense sampling (841 individuals) of genetic and demographic data...

Data from: Predicting rates of isotopic turnover across the animal kingdom: a synthesis of existing data

Stephen M. Thomas & Thomas W. Crowther
The stable isotopes of carbon (13C /12C) and nitrogen (15N /14N) represent powerful tools in food-web ecology, providing a wide range of dietary information in animal consumers. However, identifying the temporal window over which a consumer's isotopic signature reflects its diet requires an understanding of elemental incorporation, a process that varies from days to years across species and tissue types. Though theory predicts body size and temperature are likely to control incorporation rates, this has...

Data from: Genetic diversity and population structure of Trypanosoma brucei in Uganda: implications for the epidemiology of sleeping sickness and Nagana

Richard Echodu, Mark J. Sistrom, Rosemary Bateta, Grace Murilla, Loyce Okedi, Serap Aksoy, Chineme Enyioha, John Enyaru, Elizabeth Opiyo, Wendy Gibson, Caccone Adalgisa, Mark Sistrom & Adalgisa Caccone
Background: While Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) is in decline on the continent of Africa, the disease still remains a major health problem in Uganda. There are recurrent sporadic outbreaks in the traditionally endemic areas in south-east Uganda, and continued spread to new unaffected areas in central Uganda. We evaluated the evolutionary dynamics underpinning the origin of new foci and the impact of host species on parasite genetic diversity in Uganda. We genotyped 269 Trypanosoma brucei...

Data from: Cross-scale interactions and the distribution-abundance relationship

Earl E. Werner, Christopher Davis, David K. Skelly, Rick A. Relyea, Michael F. Benard, Shannon J. McCauley & Christopher J. Davis
Positive interspecific relationships between local abundance and extent of regional distribution are among the most ubiquitous patterns in ecology. Although multiple hypotheses have been proposed, the mechanisms underlying distribution-abundance (d-a) relationships remain poorly understood. We examined the intra- and interspecific distribution-abundance relationships for a metacommunity of 13 amphibian species sampled for 15 consecutive years. Mean density of larvae in occupied ponds was positively related to number of ponds occupied by species; employing the fraction of...

Data from: Variation in gut microbial communities and its association with pathogen infection in wild bumble bees (Bombus)

Daniel P. Cariveau, J. Elijah Powell, Hauke Koch, Rachael Winfree & Nancy A. Moran
Bacterial gut symbiont communities are critical for the health of many insect species. However, little is known about how microbial communities vary among host species or how they respond to anthropogenic disturbances. Bacterial communities that differ in richness or composition may vary in their ability to provide nutrients or defenses. We used deep sequencing to investigate gut microbiota of three species in the genus Bombus (bumble bees). Bombus are among the most economically and ecologically...

Data from: Endocranial anatomy of a new fossil porpoise (Odontoceti: Phocoenidae) from the Pliocene San Diego Formation of California

Rachel A. Racicot & Timothy Rowe
The Pliocene fossil porpoise SDSNH 65276 has extremely elongate mandibular morphology, unlike that of any marine amniote, and is superficially most similar to the living bird species known as skimmers (Rynchops sp.). Endocasts of the pterygoid sinuses and endocranial cavity were digitally segmented from high-resolution X-ray CT scans of the specimen to explore internal anatomy of functionally and phylogenetically important anatomical features of this specimen and odontocetes in general. The sinuses are similar in volume...

Data from: Antibiotic resistance correlates with transmission in plasmid evolution

Paul E. Turner, Elizabeth S. C. P. Williams, Chijioke Okeke, Vaughn S. Cooper, Siobain Duffy, John Wertz & John E. Wertz
Conjugative (horizontally transmissible) plasmids are autonomous replicators, whose ‘self-interests’ do not necessarily overlap with those of their hosts. This situation causes plasmids and bacteria to sometimes experience differing selection pressures. Escherichia coli plasmid pB15 contains genes for resistance to several antibiotics, including tetracycline. When plasmid-bearing cells were experimentally evolved in the laboratory, changes in resistance level in the unselected tetracycline marker coincided with changes in plasmid rates of vertical versus horizontal transmission. Here we used...

Data from: From refugia to rookeries: phylogeography of Atlantic green turtles

Eugenia Naro-Maciel, Brendan N. Reid, S. Elizabeth Alter, George Amato, Karen A. Bjorndal, Alan B. Bolten, Meredith Martin, Campbell J. Nairn, Brian Shamblin & Oscar Pineda-Catalan
Investigating species’ distribution and abundance over time is central to evolutionary biology, and provides important context for conservation and management. With respect to population genetic structure in green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas), certain processes such as female philopatry to natal rookeries are well understood, while others, such as male philopatry and historical changes in distribution and abundance, remain relatively understudied. Further, although inferences from mitochondrial DNA and nuclear microsatellites have both been critical in identifying...

Data from: Exposure to mitochondrial genotoxins and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans

Claudia P. Gonzalez-Hunt, Maxwell C. K. Leung, Rakesh K. Bodhicharla, Madeline G. McKeever, Andrew E. Arrant, Kathleen M. Margillo, Ian T. Ryde, Derek D. Cyr, Sara G. Kosmaczewski, Marc Hammarlund & Joel N. Meyer
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Data from: The impact of shifts in marine biodiversity hotspots on patterns of range evolution: evidence from the Holocentridae (squirrelfishes and soldierfishes)

Alex Dornburg, Jon Moore, Jeremy Michael Beaulieu, Ron I. Eytan & Thomas J. Near
One of the most striking biodiversity patterns is the uneven distribution of marine species richness, with species diversity in the Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA) exceeding all other areas. However, the IAA formed fairly recently, and marine biodiversity hotspots have shifted across nearly half the globe since the Paleogene. Understanding how lineages have responded to shifting biodiversity hotspots represents a necessary historic perspective on the formation and maintenance of global marine biodiversity. Such evolutionary inferences are often...

Data from: Delayed transmission selects for increased survival of vesicular stomatitis virus

Brian R. Wasik, Ambika Bhushan, C. Brandon Ogbunugafor & Paul E. Turner
Life-history theory predicts that traits for survival and reproduction cannot be simultaneous maximized in evolving populations. For this reason, in obligate parasites such as infectious viruses, selection for improved between-host survival during transmission may lead to evolution of decreased within-host reproduction. We tested this idea using experimental evolution of RNA virus populations, passaged under differing transmission times in the laboratory. A single ancestral genotype of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), a negative-sense RNA Rhabdovirus, was used...

Data from: Sexual size dimorphism is not associated with the evolution of parental care in frogs

Melanie J. Monroe & Suzanne H. Alonzo
Sex differences in parental care are thought to arise from differential selection on the sexes. Sexual dimorphism, including sexual size dimorphism (SSD), is often used as a proxy for sexual selection on males. Some studies have found an association between male-biased SSD (i.e., males larger than females) and the loss of paternal care. While the relationship between sexual selection on males and parental care evolution has been studied extensively, the relationship between female-biased SSD (i.e.,...

Data from: A role of OCRL in clathrin-coated pit fission and uncoating revealed by studies of Lowe syndrome cells

Ramiro Nández, Daniel M. Balkin, Mirko Messa, Summer Paradise, Heather Czapla, Marco Y. Hein, Matthias Mann, Pietro De Camilli, James S Duncan & Liang Liang
Mutations in the inositol 5-phosphatase OCRL cause Lowe syndrome and Dent's disease. Although OCRL, a direct clathrin interactor, is recruited to late-stage clathrin-coated pits, clinical manifestations have been primarily attributed to intracellular sorting defects. Here we show that OCRL loss in Lowe syndrome patient fibroblasts impacts clathrin-mediated endocytosis and results in an endocytic defect. These cells exhibit an accumulation of clathrin-coated vesicles and an increase in U-shaped clathrin-coated pits, which may result from sequestration of...

Data from: Phylogenetic informativeness reconciles ray-finned fish molecular divergence times

Alex Dornburg, Jeffrey P. Townsend, Matt Friedman & Thomas J. Near
Discordance among individual molecular age estimates, or between molecular age estimates and the fossil record, is observed in many clades across the Tree of Life. This discordance is attributed to a variety of variables including calibration age uncertainty, calibration placement, nucleotide substitution rate heterogeneity, or the specified molecular clock model. However, the impact of changes in phylogenetic informativeness of individual genes over time on phylogenetic inferences is rarely analyzed. Using nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data...

Data from: Mate preference for a phenotypically plastic trait is learned, and may facilitate preference-phenotype matching

Erica L. Westerman, Napon Chirathivat, Elizabeth Schyling & Antónia Monteiro
Fixed, genetically determined, mate preferences for species whose adult phenotype varies with rearing environment may be maladaptive, as the phenotype that is most fit in the parental environment may be absent in the offspring environment. Mate preference in species with polyphenisms (environmentally dependent alternative phenotypes) should therefore either not focus on polyphenic traits, be polyphenic themselves, or learned each generation. Here we test these alternative hypotheses by first describing a female-limited seasonal polyphenism in a...

Data from: Direct behavioral and neurophysiological evidence for retronasal olfaction in mice

Michelle R. Rebello, Padma Kandukuru & Justus V. Verhagen
The neuroscience of flavor perception is hence becoming increasingly important to understand food flavor perception that guides food selection, ingestion and appreciation. We recently provided evidence that rats can use the retronasal mode of olfaction, an essential element of human flavor perception. We showed that in rats, like humans, odors can acquire a taste. We and others also defined how the input of the olfactory bulb (OB) -not functionally imageable in humans- codes retronasal smell...

Data from: Stability of the gorilla microbiome despite simian immunodeficiency virus infection

Andrew H. Moeller, Martine Peeters, Ahidjo Ayouba, Eitel Mpoudi Ngole, Amadine Esteban, Beatrice H. Hahn & Howard Ochman
Simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) have been discovered in over 45 primate species; however, the pathogenic potential of most SIV strains remains unknown due to difficulties inherent in observing wild populations. Because those SIV infections that are pathogenic have been shown to induce changes in the host's gut microbiome, monitoring the microbiota present in faecal samples can provide a noninvasive means for studying the effects of SIV infection on the health of wild-living primates. Here, we...

Data from: Temperate radiations and dying embers of a tropical past: the diversification of Viburnum

Elizabeth L. Spriggs, Wendy L. Clement, Patrick W. Sweeney, Santiago Madriñán, Erika J. Edwards & Michael J. Donoghue
We used a near-complete phylogeny for the angiosperm clade Viburnum to assess lineage diversification rates, and to examine possible morphological and ecological factors driving radiations. Maximum-likelihood and Bayesian approaches identified shifts in diversification rate and possible links to character evolution. We inferred the ancestral environment for Viburnum and changes in diversification dynamics associated with subsequent biome shifts. Viburnum probably diversified in tropical forests of Southeast Asia in the Eocene, with three subsequent radiations in temperate...

Data from: Phylogenetic relationships and timing of diversification in gonorynchiform fishes inferred using nuclear gene DNA sequences (Teleostei: Ostariophysi)

Thomas J. Near, Alex Dornburg & Matt Friedman
The Gonorynchiformes are the sister lineage of the species-rich Otophysi and provide important insights into the diversification of ostariophysan fishes. Phylogenies of gonorynchiforms inferred using morphological characters and mtDNA gene sequences provide differing resolutions with regard to the sister lineage of all other gonorynchiforms (Chanos vs. Gonorynchus) and support for monophyly of the two miniaturized lineages Cromeria and Grasseichthys. In this study the phylogeny and divergence times of gonorynchiforms are investigated with DNA sequences sampled...

Data from: Multilocus coalescent analyses reveal the demographic history and speciation patterns of mouse lemur sister species

Christopher Blair, Kellie L. Heckman, Amy L. Russell & Anne D. Yoder
Background: Debate continues as to whether allopatric speciation or peripatric speciation through a founder effect is the predominant force driving evolution in vertebrates. The mouse lemurs of Madagascar are a system in which evolution has generated a large number of species over a relatively recent time frame. Here, we examine speciation patterns in a pair of sister species of mouse lemur, Microcebus murinus and M. griseorufus. These two species have ranges that are disparately proportioned...

Data from: A chloroplast tree for Viburnum (Adoxaceae) and its implications for phylogenetic classification and character evolution

Wendy C. Clement, Mónica Arakaki, Patrick W. Sweeney, Erika J. Edwards & Michael J. Donoghue
Premise of the study: Despite recent progress, significant uncertainties remain concerning relationships among early-branching lineages within Viburnum (Adoxaceae). This has prohibited a new classification, and has hindered studies of character evolution and the increasing use of Viburnum in addressing a wide range of ecological and evolutionary questions. We hoped to resolve these issues by sequencing whole plastid genomes for representative species and combining these with molecular data previously obtained from an expanded taxon sample. Methods:...

Data from: Naturally rare versus newly rare: demographic inferences on two timescales inform conservation of Galápagos giant tortoises

Ryan C. Garrick, Brittney Kajdacsi, Michael A. Russello, Edgar Benavides, Chaz Hyseni, James P. Gibbs, Washington Tapia & Adalgisa Caccone
Long-term population history can influence the genetic effects of recent bottlenecks. Therefore, for threatened or endangered species, an understanding of the past is relevant when formulating conservation strategies. Levels of variation at neutral markers have been useful for estimating local effective population sizes (Ne) and inferring whether population sizes increased or decreased over time. Furthermore, analyses of genotypic, allelic frequency, and phylogenetic information can potentially be used to separate historical from recent demographic changes. For...

Registration Year

  • 2014
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  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Yale University
    26
  • Queens College, CUNY
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  • University of Oxford
    3
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    2
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    2
  • Duke University
    2
  • State University of New York
    2
  • National University of Singapore
    2
  • University of Tennessee at Knoxville
    2
  • University of Mississippi
    2