81 Works

Data from: Lineage fusion in Galápagos giant tortoises

Ryan C. Garrick, Edgar Benavides, Michael A. Russello, Chaz Hyseni, Danielle L. Edwards, James P. Gibbs, Washington Tapia, Claudio Ciofi & Adalgisa Caccone
Although many classic radiations on islands are thought to be the result of repeated lineage splitting, the role of past fusion is rarely known because during these events, purebreds are rapidly replaced by a swarm of admixed individuals. Here we capture lineage fusion in action in a Galápagos giant tortoise species, Chelonoidis becki, from Wolf Volcano (Isabela Island). The long generation time of Galápagos tortoises and dense sampling (841 individuals) of genetic and demographic data...

Data from: Variation in growth and developmental responses to supraoptimal temperatures near latitudinal range limits of gypsy moth Lymantria dispar (L.), an expanding invasive species

Lily M. Thompson, Trevor M. Faske, Nana Banahene, Dominique Grim, Salvatore J. Agosta, Dylan Parry, Patrick C. Tobin, Derek M. Johnson & Kristine L. Grayson
Variation in thermal performance within and between populations provides the potential for adaptive responses to increasing temperatures associated with climate change. Organisms experiencing temperatures above their optimum on a thermal performance curve exhibit rapid declines in function and these supraoptimal temperatures can be a critical physiological component of range limits. The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.) (Lepidoptera: Erebidae), is one of the best-documented biological invasions and factors driving its spatial spread are of significant ecological...

Data from: Major urinary protein levels are associated with social status and context in mouse social hierarchies

Won Lee, Amber Khan & James P. Curley
We have previously shown that male mice living in groups of 12 males establish and maintain stable linear social hierarchies with each individual having a defined social rank. However, it is not clear which social cues mice use to signal and recognize their relative social status within their hierarchy. In this study, we investigate how individual social status both in pairs and in groups affects the levels of major urinary proteins (MUPs) and specifically MUP20...

Data from: Multi-DICE: R package for comparative population genomic inference under hierarchical co-demographic models of independent single-population size changes

Alexander T. Xue & Michael J. Hickerson
Population genetic data from multiple taxa can address comparative phylogeographic questions about community-scale response to environmental shifts, and a useful strategy to this end is to employ hierarchical co-demographic models that directly test multi-taxa hypotheses within a single, unified analysis while benefiting in statistical power from aggregating datasets. This approach has been applied to classical phylogeographic datasets such as mitochondrial barcodes as well as reduced-genome polymorphism datasets that can yield 10,000s of SNPs, produced by...

Data from: The challenge of modeling niches and distributions for data-poor species: a comprehensive approach to model complexity

Peter J. Galante, Babatunde Alade, Robert Muscarella, Sharon A. Jansa, Steven M. Goodman & Robert P. Anderson
Models of species ecological niches and geographic distributions now represent a widely used tool in ecology, evolution, and biogeography. However, the very common situation of species with few available occurrence localities presents major challenges for such modeling techniques, in particular regarding model complexity and evaluation. Here, we summarize the state of the field regarding these issues and provide a worked example using the technique Maxent for a small mammal endemic to Madagascar (the nesomyine rodent...

Data from: Genomic differentiation during speciation-with-gene-flow: comparing geographic and host-related variation in divergent life history adaptation in Rhagoletis pomonella

Meredith M. Doellman, Gregory J. Ragland, Glen R. Hood, Peter J. Meyers, Scott P. Egan, Thomas H.Q. Powell, Peter Lazorchak, Mary M. Glover, Cheyenne Tait, Hannes Schuler, Daniel A. Hahn, Stewart H. Berlocher, James J. Smith, Patrik Nosil, Jeffrey L. Feder, Daniel Hahn, Stewart Berlocher, Peter Meyers, Scott Egan, Jeffrey Feder, Glen Hood, Thomas Powell & Gregory Ragland
A major goal of evolutionary biology is to understand how variation within populations gets partitioned into differences between reproductively isolated species. Here, we examine the degree to which diapause life history timing, a critical adaptation promoting population divergence, explains geographic and host-related genetic variation in ancestral hawthorn and recently derived apple-infesting races of Rhagoletis pomonella. Our strategy involved combining experiments on two different aspects of diapause (initial diapause intensity and adult eclosion time) with a...

Data from: Cryptic diversity and discordance in single-locus species delimitation methods within horned lizards (Phrynosomatidae: Phrynosoma)

Christopher Blair, & Robert W. Bryson
Biodiversity reduction and loss continues to progress at an alarming rate, and thus there is widespread interest in utilizing rapid and efficient methods for quantifying and delimiting taxonomic diversity. Single-locus species-delimitation methods have become popular, in part due to the adoption of the DNA barcoding paradigm. These techniques can be broadly classified into tree-based and distance-based methods depending on whether species are delimited based on a constructed genealogy. Although the relative performance of these methods...

Data from: Behavioral response to song and genetic divergence in two subspecies of white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys)

Sara E. Lipshutz, Isaac A. Overcast, Michael J. Hickerson, Robb T. Brumfield & Elizabeth P. Derryberry
Divergence in sexual signals may drive reproductive isolation between lineages, but behavioral barriers can weaken in contact zones. Here, we investigate the role of song as a behavioral and genetic barrier in a contact zone between two subspecies of white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys). We employed a reduced genomic dataset to assess population structure and infer the history underlying divergence, gene flow and hybridization. We also measured divergence in song and tested behavioral responses to song...

Data from: Multi-locus analyses reveal four giraffe species instead of one

Julian Fennessy, Tobias Bidon, Friederike Reuss, Vikas Kumar, Paul Elkan, Maria A. Nilsson, Melita Vamberger, Uwe Fritz & Axel Janke
Traditionally, one giraffe species and up to eleven subspecies have been recognized [ 1 ]; however, nine subspecies are commonly accepted [ 2 ]. Even after a century of research, the distinctness of each giraffe subspecies remains unclear, and the genetic variation across their distribution range has been incompletely explored. Recent genetic studies on mtDNA have shown reciprocal monophyly of the matrilines among seven of the nine assumed subspecies [ 3, 4 ]. Moreover, until...

Data from: Frequency and fitness consequences of bacteriophage φ6 host range mutations

Brian E. Ford, Bruce Sun, James Carpino, Elizabeth S. Chapler, Jane Ching, Yoon Choi, Kevin Jhun, Jung D. Kim, Gregory G. Lallos, Rachelle Morgenstern, Shalini Singh, Sai Theja & John J. Dennehy
Viruses readily mutate and gain the ability to infect novel hosts, but few data are available regarding the number of possible host range-expanding mutations allowing infection of any given novel host, and the fitness consequences of these mutations on original and novel hosts. To gain insight into the process of host range expansion, we isolated and sequenced 69 independent mutants of the dsRNA bacteriophage Φ6 able to infect the novel host, Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes. In total,...

Data from: Does the house sparrow Passer domesticus represent a global model species for egg rejection behavior?

Thomas Manna, Caren Cooper, Shane Baylis, Matthew D. Shawkey, Geoffrey I. N. Waterhouse, Tomas Grim & Mark E. Hauber
Conspecific brood parasitism (CP) is a facultative breeding tactic whereby females lay their eggs in the nests of conspecifics. In some species, potential host individuals have evolved the ability to identify and reject foreign eggs from their nest. Previous studies suggest that the ubiquitous House Sparrow Passer domesticus in Spain and South Africa employs both CP and parasitic egg rejection, while a population in China does not. Given the species’ invasive range expansions, the House...

Data from: Climate change will increase savannas at the expense of forests and treeless vegetation in tropical and subtropical Americas

José D. Anadon, Osvaldo E. Sala & Fernando T. Maestre
1. Transition areas between biomes are particularly sensitive to environmental changes. Our understanding of the impacts of ongoing climate change on terrestrial ecosystems has significantly increased during the last years. However, it is largely unknown how climatic change will affect transitions among major vegetation types. 2. We modelled the distribution of three alternative states (forest, savanna and treeless areas) in the tropical and subtropical Americas by means of climate-niche modelling. We studied how such distribution...

Data from: Climate impacts on trans-ocean dispersal and habitat in gray whales from the Pleistocene to 2100

S. Elizabeth Alter, Matthias Meyer, Klaas Post, Paul Czechowski, Peter Gravlund, Cork Gaines, Howard C. Rosenbaum, Kristin Kaschner, Samuel T. Turvey, Johannes Van Der Plicht, Beth Shapiro & Michael Hofreiter
Arctic animals face dramatic habitat alteration due to ongoing climate change. Understanding how such species have responded to past glacial cycles can help us forecast their response to today's changing climate. Gray whales are among those marine species likely to be strongly affected by Arctic climate change, but a thorough analysis of past climate impacts on this species has been complicated by lack of information about an extinct population in the Atlantic. While little is...

Data from: What shapes cerambycid beetle communities in a tropical forest mosaic? Assessing the effects of host tree identity, forest structure, and vertical stratification

Lin Li, Reinaldo Aguilar & Amy Berkov
Due to anthropogenic activities, tropical rain forests face many challenges in sustaining biodiversity and maintaining global climates. This study explores how forest successional stage, tree composition, and stratum affect communities of saproxylic cerambycid beetles—concealed feeders that play important roles in forest nutrient cycling. Forty trees in five families (Fabaceae, Lecythidaceae, Malvaceae, Moraceae, and Sapotaceae) were sampled in a mosaic of old-growth and secondary forest on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. Bait branches yielded 3549 cerambycid...

Data from: Population genomics reveals seahorses (Hippocampus erectus) of the western mid-Atlantic coast to be residents rather than vagrants

J.T. Boehm, John Waldman, John D. Robinson, Michael J. Hickerson & J. T. Boehm
Understanding population structure and areas of demographic persistence and transients is critical for effective species management. However, direct observational evidence to address the geographic scale and delineation of ephemeral or persistent populations for many marine fishes is limited. The Lined seahorse (Hippocampus erectus) can be commonly found in three western Atlantic zoogeographic provinces, though inhabitants of the temperate northern Virginia Province are often considered tropical vagrants that only arrive during warm seasons from the southern...

Data from: Impact of forestry practices at a landscape scale on the dynamics of amphibian populations

Elizabeth B. Harper, David A. Patrick & James P. Gibbs
Forest loss is a primary cause of worldwide amphibian decline. Timber harvesting in the United States has caused dramatic changes in quality and extent of forest ecosystems, and intensive forest management still occurs. Although numerous studies have documented substantial reductions in amphibian densities related to timber harvest, subsequent extinctions are rare. To better understand the population dynamics that have allowed so many amphibian species to persist in the face of widespread forest disturbance, we developed...

Data from: Range-wide populations of a long-distance migratory songbird converge during stopover in the tropics

Camila Gomez, Sara L. Guerrero, Alyssa M. FitzGerald, Nicholas J. Bayly, Keith A. Hobson & Carlos Daniel Cadena
Geographic convergence during migration influences the extent to which animal populations may experience carry-over effects across periods of the annual cycle. When most individuals of a population share geographic areas during a given period, carry-over effects are likely stronger than when individuals occupy multiple areas. We used genetic data and stable isotope (δ2H) measurements from feathers and claws to describe the likely breeding and wintering geographic origins of a long-distance migratory songbird (Gray-cheeked Thrush, Catharus...

Data from: Spatially explicit summary statistics for historical population genetic inference

Diego F. Alvarado-Serrano & Michael J. Hickerson
The integration of population genetics with explicit spatial analyses is crucial to address a range of evolutionary and ecological questions under realistic scenarios. Ignoring space can lead to misleading inferences, yet incorporating spatial realism leads to using complex evolutionary models that necessitate distilling raw genetic data into summary statistics that capture information relevant to the models in question. However, summary statistics derived from traditional population genetic theory overlook the valuable spatial component of genetic variation...

Data from: Genome-wide assessment of diversity and divergence among extant Galápagos giant tortoise species

Joshua M. Miller, Maud C. Quinzin, Danielle L. Edwards, Deren A.R. Eaton, Evelyn L. Jensen, Michael A. Russello, James P. Gibbs, Washington Tapia, Danny Rueda, Adalgisa Caccone & Deren A R Eaton
Genome-wide assessments allow for fuller characterization of genetic diversity, finer-scale population delineation, and better detection of demographically significant units to guide conservation compared to those based on “traditional” markers. Galapagos giant tortoises (Chelonoidis spp.) have long provided a case study for how evolutionary genetics may be applied to advance species conservation. Ongoing efforts to bolster tortoise populations, which have declined by 90%, have been informed by analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequence and microsatellite genotypic data,...

Data from: The perceptual and chemical basis of egg discrimination in communally nesting Greater Anis (Crotophaga major)

Mark E. Hauber, Miri Dainson, Daniel T. Baldassarre, Marouf Hossain, Mande Holford & Christina Riehl
The eggshells of communally breeding Greater Anis (Crotophaga major) consist of a blue-green pigmented calcite matrix overlaid by a chalky white layer of vaterite, both of which are polymorphs of calcium carbonate. The white vaterite layer is intact in freshly laid eggs and may function in protecting the eggs from mechanical damage, but it also abrades during incubation to reveal the blue calcite shell underneath. Previous research has shown that this color change serves a...

Data from: Four decades of cultural evolution in House Finch songs

Chenghui Ju, Frances C. Geller, Paul C. Mundinger & David C. Lathi
Bird song is the primary animal model system for cultural evolution. Longitudinal studies of bird song across many generations can provide insights into patterns and mechanisms of change in socially transmitted traits. In this study, we conducted a comparative analysis of songs of the House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) across an interval of 37 years (in 1975 and in 2012). Recordings from both years were collected in western Long Island, New York, which is thought to...

Data from: Geographic body size variation in the periodical cicadas Magicicada: implications for life cycle divergence and local adaptation

Takuya Koyama, Hiromu Ito, Satoshi Kakishima, Jin Yoshimura, John R. Cooley, Chris Simon & Teiji Sota
Seven species in three species groups (Decim, Cassini and Decula) of periodical cicadas (Magicicada) occupy a wide latitudinal range in the eastern United States. To clarify how adult body size, a key trait affecting fitness, varies geographically with climate conditions and life cycle, we analysed the relationships of population mean head width to geographic variables (latitude, longitude, altitude), habitat annual mean temperature (AMT), life cycle and species differences. Within species, body size was larger in...

Data from: Population genomics of the Anthropocene: urbanization is negatively associated with genome-wide variation in white-footed mouse populations

Jason Munshi-South, Christine P. Zolnik & Stephen E. Harris
Urbanization results in pervasive habitat fragmentation and reduces standing genetic variation through bottlenecks and drift. Loss of genomewide variation may ultimately reduce the evolutionary potential of animal populations experiencing rapidly changing conditions. In this study, we examined genomewide variation among 23 white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) populations sampled along an urbanization gradient in the New York City metropolitan area. Genomewide variation was estimated as a proxy for evolutionary potential using more than 10 000 single nucleotide...

Data from: Mlh3 mutations in baker's yeast alter meiotic recombination outcomes by increasing noncrossover events genome-wide

Najla Al-Sweel, Vandana Raghavan, Abhishek Dutta, V. P. Ajith, Luigi Di Vietro, Nabila Khondakar, Carol M. Manhart, Jennifer Surtees, K. T. Nishant, Eric Alani & Jennifer A. Surtees
Mlh1-Mlh3 is an endonuclease hypothesized to act in meiosis to resolve double Holliday junctions into crossovers. It also plays a minor role in eukaryotic DNA mismatch repair (MMR). To understand how Mlh1-Mlh3 functions in both meiosis and MMR, we analyzed in baker's yeast 60 new mlh3 alleles. Five alleles specifically disrupted MMR, whereas one (mlh3-32) specifically disrupted meiotic crossing over. Mlh1-mlh3 representatives for each class were purified and characterized. Both Mlh1-mlh3-32 (MMR+, crossover-) and Mlh1-mlh3-45...

Data from: Characterization of human cortical gene expression in relation to glucose utilization.

Kirstin N. Sterner, Michael R. McGowen, Harry T. Chugani, Adi L. Tarca, Chet C. Sherwood, Patrick R. Hof, Christopher W. Kuzawa, Amy M. Boddy, Ryan L. Raaum, Amy Weckle, Leonard Lipovich, Lawrence I. Grossman, Monica Uddin, Morris Goodman & Derek E. Wildman
Objectives: Human brain development follows a unique pattern characterized by a prolonged period of postnatal growth and reorganization, and a postnatal peak in glucose utilization. The molecular processes underlying these developmental changes are poorly characterized. The objectives of this study were to determine developmental trajectories of gene expression and to examine the evolutionary history of genes differentially expressed as a function of age. Methods: We used microarrays to determine age-related patterns of mRNA expression in...

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