81 Works

Data from: Genome-wide SNP data reveal cryptic phylogeographic structure and microallopatric divergence in a rapids-adapted clade of cichlids from the Congo River

S. Elizabeth Alter, Jason Munshi-South & M.L.J. Stiassny
The lower Congo River (LCR) is a freshwater biodiversity hotspot in Africa characterized by some of the world's largest rapids. However, little is known about the evolutionary forces shaping this diversity, which include numerous endemic fishes. We investigated phylogeographic relationships in Teleogramma, a small clade of rheophilic cichlids, in the context of regional geography and hydrology. Previous studies have been unable to resolve phylogenetic relationships within Teleogramma due to lack of variation in nuclear genes...

Data from: Isolation with asymmetric gene flow during the nonsynchronous divergence of dry forest birds

Jessica A. Oswald, Isaac Overcast, , Michael J. Andersen & Brian Tilston Smith
Dry forest bird communities in South America are often fragmented by intervening mountains and rainforests, generating high local endemism. The historical assembly of dry forest communities likely results from dynamic processes linked to numerous population histories among codistributed species. Nevertheless, species may diversify in the same way through time if landscape and environmental features, or species ecologies, similarly structure populations. Here we tested whether six co-distributed taxon pairs that occur in the dry forests of...

Data from: Considering gene flow when using coalescent methods to delimit lineages of North American pitvipers of the genus Agkistrodon

Frank T. Burbrink & Timothy J. Guiher
Examining species diversity and mechanisms of speciation using coalescent models provides a framework for how regional diversity is accrued, even in well-studied areas such as the Nearctic. It is likely, that gene flow among closely-related species with adjacent distributions may be common. However, the absence of gene flow is a primary assumption of many phylogeographical methods that produce species trees and delimit species using Bayesian or likelihood functions in a coalescent framework. In the present...

Data from: Effectiveness of phylogenomic data and coalescent species-tree methods for resolving difficult nodes in the phylogeny of advanced snakes (Serpentes: Caenophidia)

R. Alexander Pyron, Catriona R. Hendry, Vincent M. Chou, Emily M. Lemmon, Alan R. Lemmon & Frank T. Burbrink
Next-generation genomic sequencing promises to quickly and cheaply resolve remaining contentious nodes in the Tree of Life, and facilitates species-tree estimation while taking into account stochastic genealogical discordance among loci. Recent methods for estimating species trees bypass full likelihood-based estimates of the multi-species coalescent, and approximate the true species-tree using simpler summary metrics. These methods converge on the true species-tree with sufficient genomic sampling, even in the anomaly zone. However, no studies have yet evaluated...

Data from: Combining genetic and demographic information to prioritize conservation efforts for anadromous alewife and blueback herring

Eric P. Palkovacs, Daniel J. Hasselman, Emily E. Argo, Stephen R. Gephard, Karin E. Limburg, David M. Post, Thomas F. Schultz & Theodore V. Willis
A major challenge in conservation biology is the need to broadly prioritize conservation efforts when demographic data are limited. One method to address this challenge is to use population genetic data to define groups of populations linked by migration and then use demographic information from monitored populations to draw inferences about the status of unmonitored populations within those groups. We applied this method to anadromous alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and blueback herring (Alosa aestivalis), species for...

Data from: Genetic rediscovery of an ‘extinct’ Galápagos giant tortoise species

Ryan C. Garrick, Edgar Benavides, Michael Russello, James Gibbs, Nikos Poulakakis, Kirstin Dion, Chaz Hyseni, Brittney Kajdacsi, Lady Márquez, Sarah Bahan, Claudio Ciofi, Washington Tapia, Adalgisa Caccone, Kirstin B. Dion, James P. Gibbs & Michael A. Russello
Genes from recently extinct species can live on in the genomes of extant individuals of mixed ancestry. Recently, Poulakakis et al. detected genetic signatures of the giant Galápagos tortoise once endemic to Floreana Island (Chelonoidis elephantopus) within eleven hybrid individuals of otherwise pure C. becki on Volcano Wolf, Isabela Island. Movement of tortoises among islands by pirate and whaling ships was not uncommon during the 1800’s, representing a likely mechanism by which individuals from Floreana...

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