12 Works

Data from: The utility of normalized difference vegetation index for predicting African buffalo forage quality

Sadie J. Ryan, Paul C. Cross, John Winnie, Craig Hay, Justin Bowers & Wayne M. Getz
Many studies of mammalian herbivores have employed remotely sensed vegetation greenness, in the form of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) as a proxy for forage quality. The assumption that reflected greenness represents forage quality often goes untested, and limited data exist on the relationships between remotely sensed and traditional forage nutrient indicators. We provide the first study connecting NDVI and forage nutrient indicators within a free-ranging African herbivore ecosystem. We examined the relationships between fecal...

Data from: Lineage fusion in Galápagos giant tortoises

Ryan C. Garrick, Edgar Benavides, Michael A. Russello, Chaz Hyseni, Danielle L. Edwards, James P. Gibbs, Washington Tapia, Claudio Ciofi & Adalgisa Caccone
Although many classic radiations on islands are thought to be the result of repeated lineage splitting, the role of past fusion is rarely known because during these events, purebreds are rapidly replaced by a swarm of admixed individuals. Here we capture lineage fusion in action in a Galápagos giant tortoise species, Chelonoidis becki, from Wolf Volcano (Isabela Island). The long generation time of Galápagos tortoises and dense sampling (841 individuals) of genetic and demographic data...

Data from: Climate change will increase savannas at the expense of forests and treeless vegetation in tropical and subtropical Americas

José D. Anadon, Osvaldo E. Sala & Fernando T. Maestre
1. Transition areas between biomes are particularly sensitive to environmental changes. Our understanding of the impacts of ongoing climate change on terrestrial ecosystems has significantly increased during the last years. However, it is largely unknown how climatic change will affect transitions among major vegetation types. 2. We modelled the distribution of three alternative states (forest, savanna and treeless areas) in the tropical and subtropical Americas by means of climate-niche modelling. We studied how such distribution...

Data from: Population genomics reveals seahorses (Hippocampus erectus) of the western mid-Atlantic coast to be residents rather than vagrants

J.T. Boehm, John Waldman, John D. Robinson, Michael J. Hickerson & J. T. Boehm
Understanding population structure and areas of demographic persistence and transients is critical for effective species management. However, direct observational evidence to address the geographic scale and delineation of ephemeral or persistent populations for many marine fishes is limited. The Lined seahorse (Hippocampus erectus) can be commonly found in three western Atlantic zoogeographic provinces, though inhabitants of the temperate northern Virginia Province are often considered tropical vagrants that only arrive during warm seasons from the southern...

Data from: Frequency and fitness consequences of bacteriophage φ6 host range mutations

Brian E. Ford, Bruce Sun, James Carpino, Elizabeth S. Chapler, Jane Ching, Yoon Choi, Kevin Jhun, Jung D. Kim, Gregory G. Lallos, Rachelle Morgenstern, Shalini Singh, Sai Theja & John J. Dennehy
Viruses readily mutate and gain the ability to infect novel hosts, but few data are available regarding the number of possible host range-expanding mutations allowing infection of any given novel host, and the fitness consequences of these mutations on original and novel hosts. To gain insight into the process of host range expansion, we isolated and sequenced 69 independent mutants of the dsRNA bacteriophage Φ6 able to infect the novel host, Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes. In total,...

Data from: From refugia to rookeries: phylogeography of Atlantic green turtles

Eugenia Naro-Maciel, Brendan N. Reid, S. Elizabeth Alter, George Amato, Karen A. Bjorndal, Alan B. Bolten, Meredith Martin, Campbell J. Nairn, Brian Shamblin & Oscar Pineda-Catalan
Investigating species’ distribution and abundance over time is central to evolutionary biology, and provides important context for conservation and management. With respect to population genetic structure in green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas), certain processes such as female philopatry to natal rookeries are well understood, while others, such as male philopatry and historical changes in distribution and abundance, remain relatively understudied. Further, although inferences from mitochondrial DNA and nuclear microsatellites have both been critical in identifying...

Data from: Bioclimatic variables derived from remote sensing: assessment and application for species distribution modeling

Eric Waltari, Ronny Schroeder, Kyle McDonald, Robert P. Anderson & Ana Carnaval
Remote sensing techniques offer an opportunity to improve biodiversity modeling and prediction worldwide. Yet, to date, the weather-station based WorldClim dataset has been the primary source of temperature and precipitation information used in correlative species distribution models. WorldClim consists of grids interpolated from in situ station data recorded primarily from 1960 to 1990. Those datasets suffer from uneven geographic coverage, with many areas of Earth poorly represented. Here, we compare two remote sensing data sources...

Data from: Early back-to-Africa migration into the Horn of Africa

Jason A. Hodgson, Connie J. Mulligan, Ali Al-Meeri & Ryan L. Raaum
Genetic studies have identified substantial non-African admixture in the Horn of Africa (HOA). In the most recent genomic studies, this non-African ancestry has been attributed to admixture with Middle Eastern populations during the last few thousand years. However, mitochondrial and Y chromosome data are suggestive of earlier episodes of admixture. To investigate this further, we generated new genome-wide SNP data for a Yemeni population sample and merged these new data with published genome-wide genetic data...

Data from: Transcriptome resources for the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus): new genomic tools for investigating ecologically divergent urban and rural populations

Stephen E. Harris, Rachel J. O'Neill & Jason Munshi-South
Genomic resources are important and attainable for examining evolutionary change in divergent natural populations of non-model species. We utilized two Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) platforms, 454 and SOLiD 5500XL, to assemble low coverage transcriptomes of the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus), a widespread and abundant native rodent in eastern North America. We sequenced liver mRNA transcripts from multiple individuals collected from urban populations in New York City and rural populations in undisturbed protected areas nearby and...

Data from: Considering gene flow when using coalescent methods to delimit lineages of North American pitvipers of the genus Agkistrodon

Frank T. Burbrink & Timothy J. Guiher
Examining species diversity and mechanisms of speciation using coalescent models provides a framework for how regional diversity is accrued, even in well-studied areas such as the Nearctic. It is likely, that gene flow among closely-related species with adjacent distributions may be common. However, the absence of gene flow is a primary assumption of many phylogeographical methods that produce species trees and delimit species using Bayesian or likelihood functions in a coalescent framework. In the present...

Data from: Effectiveness of phylogenomic data and coalescent species-tree methods for resolving difficult nodes in the phylogeny of advanced snakes (Serpentes: Caenophidia)

R. Alexander Pyron, Catriona R. Hendry, Vincent M. Chou, Emily M. Lemmon, Alan R. Lemmon & Frank T. Burbrink
Next-generation genomic sequencing promises to quickly and cheaply resolve remaining contentious nodes in the Tree of Life, and facilitates species-tree estimation while taking into account stochastic genealogical discordance among loci. Recent methods for estimating species trees bypass full likelihood-based estimates of the multi-species coalescent, and approximate the true species-tree using simpler summary metrics. These methods converge on the true species-tree with sufficient genomic sampling, even in the anomaly zone. However, no studies have yet evaluated...

Data from: Naturally rare versus newly rare: demographic inferences on two timescales inform conservation of Galápagos giant tortoises

Ryan C. Garrick, Brittney Kajdacsi, Michael A. Russello, Edgar Benavides, Chaz Hyseni, James P. Gibbs, Washington Tapia & Adalgisa Caccone
Long-term population history can influence the genetic effects of recent bottlenecks. Therefore, for threatened or endangered species, an understanding of the past is relevant when formulating conservation strategies. Levels of variation at neutral markers have been useful for estimating local effective population sizes (Ne) and inferring whether population sizes increased or decreased over time. Furthermore, analyses of genotypic, allelic frequency, and phylogenetic information can potentially be used to separate historical from recent demographic changes. For...

Registration Year

  • 2014
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Queens College, CUNY
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  • City University of New York
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  • American Museum of Natural History
    3
  • Yale University
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  • State University of New York
    2
  • University of Mississippi
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  • University of Florida
    2
  • University of British Columbia
    2
  • National Park Service
    2
  • University of Hohenheim
    1