11 Works

Data from: Quantifying the human impacts on Papua New Guinea reef fish communities across space and time

Joshua A. Drew, Ruth A. Hufbauer & Kathryn L. Amatangelo
Describing the drivers of species loss and of community change are important goals in both conservation and ecology. However, it is difficult to determine whether exploited species decline due to direct effects of harvesting or due to other environmental perturbations brought about by proximity to human populations. Here we quantify differences in species richness of coral reef fish communities along a human population gradient in Papua New Guinea to understand the relative impacts of fishing...

Data from: Toward the genetic origins of a potentially non-native population of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) in Alberta

Andrew M. Rezansoff, Erika Crispo, Christopher Blair, Edward Cruz, Jun Kitano, Steven M. Vamosi & Sean M. Rogers
Disentangling the origin of putatively introduced/invasive species is of increasing priority in conservation biology. The presence of a previously undocumented species may be due to an undetected recent population or range expansion associated with environmental change, or due to an introduction by humans. We used molecular tools to address the origin of a population of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) first identified in central Alberta, Canada in 1980 from a single lake. We characterized this inland,...

Data from: Rate of evolutionary change in cranial morphology of the marsupial genus Monodelphis is constrained by the availability of additive genetic variation

Arthur Porto, Harley Sebastião, Silvia Eliza Pavan, John L. VandeBerg, Gabriel Marroig & James M. Cheverud
We tested the hypothesis that the rate of marsupial cranial evolution is dependent on the distribution of genetic variation in multivariate space. To do so, we carried out a genetic analysis of cranial morphological variation in laboratory strains of Monodelphis domestica and used estimates of genetic covariation to analyze the morphological diversification of the Monodelphis brevicaudata species group. We found that within-species genetic variation is concentrated in only a few axes of the morphospace and...

Data from: Speciation with gene flow in whiptail lizards from a Neotropical xeric biome

Eliana F. Oliveira, Marcelo Gehara, Vinícius A. São Pedro, Xin Chen, Edward A. Myers, Frank T. Burbrink, Daniel O. Mesquita, Adrian A. Garda, Guarino R. Colli, Miguel T. Rodrigues, Federico J. Arias, Hussam Zaher, Rodrigo M. L. Santos & Gabriel C. Costa
Two main hypotheses have been proposed to explain the diversification of the Caatinga biota. The riverine barrier hypothesis (RBH) claims that the São Francisco River (SFR) is a major biogeographic barrier to gene flow. The Pleistocene climatic fluctuation hypothesis (PCH) states that gene flow, geographic genetic structure, and demographic signatures on endemic Caatinga taxa were influenced by Quaternary climate fluctuation cycles. Herein we analyze genetic diversity and structure, phylogeographic history, and diversification of a widespread...

Data from: Climate impacts on trans-ocean dispersal and habitat in gray whales from the Pleistocene to 2100

S. Elizabeth Alter, Matthias Meyer, Klaas Post, Paul Czechowski, Peter Gravlund, Cork Gaines, Howard C. Rosenbaum, Kristin Kaschner, Samuel T. Turvey, Johannes Van Der Plicht, Beth Shapiro & Michael Hofreiter
Arctic animals face dramatic habitat alteration due to ongoing climate change. Understanding how such species have responded to past glacial cycles can help us forecast their response to today's changing climate. Gray whales are among those marine species likely to be strongly affected by Arctic climate change, but a thorough analysis of past climate impacts on this species has been complicated by lack of information about an extinct population in the Atlantic. While little is...

Data from: Impact of forestry practices at a landscape scale on the dynamics of amphibian populations

Elizabeth B. Harper, David A. Patrick & James P. Gibbs
Forest loss is a primary cause of worldwide amphibian decline. Timber harvesting in the United States has caused dramatic changes in quality and extent of forest ecosystems, and intensive forest management still occurs. Although numerous studies have documented substantial reductions in amphibian densities related to timber harvest, subsequent extinctions are rare. To better understand the population dynamics that have allowed so many amphibian species to persist in the face of widespread forest disturbance, we developed...

Data from: Spatially explicit summary statistics for historical population genetic inference

Diego F. Alvarado-Serrano & Michael J. Hickerson
The integration of population genetics with explicit spatial analyses is crucial to address a range of evolutionary and ecological questions under realistic scenarios. Ignoring space can lead to misleading inferences, yet incorporating spatial realism leads to using complex evolutionary models that necessitate distilling raw genetic data into summary statistics that capture information relevant to the models in question. However, summary statistics derived from traditional population genetic theory overlook the valuable spatial component of genetic variation...

Data from: The aggregate site frequency spectrum (aSFS) for comparative population genomic inference

Alexander T. Xue & Michael J. Hickerson
Understanding how assemblages of species responded to past climate change is a central goal of comparative phylogeography and comparative population genomics, and an endeavor that has increasing potential to integrate with community ecology. New sequencing technology now provides the potential to gain complex demographic inference at unprecedented resolution across assemblages of non-model species. To this end, we introduce the aggregate site frequency spectrum (aSFS), an expansion of the site frequency spectrum to use single nucleotide...

Data from: Geographic body size variation in the periodical cicadas Magicicada: implications for life cycle divergence and local adaptation

Takuya Koyama, Hiromu Ito, Satoshi Kakishima, Jin Yoshimura, John R. Cooley, Chris Simon & Teiji Sota
Seven species in three species groups (Decim, Cassini and Decula) of periodical cicadas (Magicicada) occupy a wide latitudinal range in the eastern United States. To clarify how adult body size, a key trait affecting fitness, varies geographically with climate conditions and life cycle, we analysed the relationships of population mean head width to geographic variables (latitude, longitude, altitude), habitat annual mean temperature (AMT), life cycle and species differences. Within species, body size was larger in...

Data from: Model misspecification confounds the estimation of rates and exaggerates their time dependency

Brent Emerson, Diego Alvarado-Serrano, Michael Hickerson, Brent C. Emerson & Michael J. Hickerson
While welcoming the comment of Ho et al. (2015), we find little that undermines the strength of our criticism, and it would appear they have misunderstood our central argument. Here we respond with the purpose of reiterating that we are (i) generally critical of much of the evidence presented in support of the time-dependent molecular rate (TDMR) hypothesis and (ii) specifically critical of estimates of μ derived from tip-dated sequences that exaggerate the importance of...

Data from: Isolation-driven functional assembly of plant communities on islands

Luka Negoita, Jason D. Fridley, Mark V. Lomolino, Glen Mittelhauser, Joseph M. Craine & Evan Weiher
The physical and biotic environment is often considered the primary driver of functional variation in plant communities. Here, we examine the hypothesis that spatial isolation may also be an important driver of functional variation in plant communities where disturbance and dispersal limitation may prevent species from occupying all suitable habitats. To test this hypothesis, we surveyed the vascular plant composition of 30 islands in the Gulf of Maine, USA, and used available functional trait and...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    11

Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Queens College, CUNY
    11
  • City University of New York
    5
  • American Museum of Natural History
    5
  • State University of New York
    2
  • University of Sao Paulo
    2
  • University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire – Barron County
    1
  • University of Adelaide
    1
  • Columbia University
    1
  • Texas Biomedical Research Institute
    1
  • City College of New York
    1