12 Works

Data from: Ultrafast evolution and loss of CRISPRs following a host shift in a novel wildlife pathogen, Mycoplasma gallisepticum

Nigel F. Delaney, Susan Balenger, Camille Bonneaud, Christopher J. Marx, Geoffrey E. Hill, Naola Ferguson-Noel, Peter Tsai, Allen Rodrigo & Scott V. Edwards
Measureable rates of genome evolution are well documented in human pathogens but are less well understood in bacterial pathogens in the wild, particularly during and after host switches. Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a pathogenic bacterium that has evolved predominantly in poultry and recently jumped to wild house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus), a common North American songbird. For the first time we characterize the genome and measure rates of genome evolution in House Finch isolates of MG,...

Data from: Contrasting theory with the empirical data of species recognition

Terry J. Ord, Léandra King & Adrian R. Young
We tested hypotheses on how animals should respond to heterospecifics encountered in the environment. Hypotheses were formulated from models parameterized to emphasize four factors that are expected to influence species discrimination: mating and territorial interactions; sex differences in resource value; environments in which heterospecifics were common or rare; and the type of identity cues available for species recognition. We also considered the role of phylogeny on contemporary responses to heterospecifics. We tested the extent these...

Data from: Resolving the evolutionary relationships of molluscs with phylogenomic tools

Stephen A. Smith, Casey W. Dunn, Nerida G. Wilson, Freya E. Goetz, Caitlin Feehery, Sónia C. S. Andrade, Greg W. Rouse & Gonzalo Giribet
Molluscs (snails, octopuses, clams, and relatives) have great body plan disparity, and among animals only arthropods surpass them in species number. This diversity has made Mollusca one of the best-studied groups of animals, yet their evolutionary relationships remain poorly resolved. Open questions have important implications for the origin of Mollusca and morphological evolution within the group. These include whether the shell-less vermiform aplacophoran molluscs diverged prior to the origin of the shelled molluscs (Conchifera), or...

Data from: DOG1 expression is predicted by the seed-maturation environment and contributes to geographic variation in germination in Arabidopsis thaliana.

George C K Chiang, Melanie Bartsch, Deepak Barua, Kazumi Nakabayashi, Marilyne Debieu, Ilkka Kronholm, Maarten Koornneef, Wim J J Soppe, Kathleen Donohue & Juliette De Meaux
Seasonal germination timing of Arabidopsis thaliana strongly influences overall life history expression and is the target of intense natural selection. This seasonal germination timing depends strongly on the interaction between genetics and seasonal environments both before and after seed dispersal. DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 (DOG1) is the first gene that has been identified to be associated with natural variation in primary dormancy in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report inter-accession variation in DOG1 expression and document...

Data from: Biogeography in a continental island: population structure of the relict endemic centipede Craterostigmus tasmanianus (Chilopoda, Craterostigmomorpha) in Tasmania using 16S rRNA and COI

Sebastián Vélez, Robert Mesibov & Gonzalo Giribet
We used 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequence data to investigate the population structure in the centipede Craterostigmus tasmanianus Pocock, 1902 (Chilopoda: Craterostigmomorpha: Craterostigmidae) and to look for possible barriers to gene flow on the island of Tasmania, where C. tasmanianus is a widespread endemic. We first confirmed a molecular diagnostic character in 28S rRNA separating Tasmanian Craterostigmus from its sister species Craterostigmus crabilli (Edgecombe and Giribet 2008) in...

Data from: Convergent evolution of phenotypic integration and its alignment with morphological diversification in Carribean Anolis ecomorphs

Jason J. Kolbe, Liam J. Revell, Brian Szekely, & Jonathan B Losos
The adaptive landscape and the G-matrix are keys concepts for understanding how quantitative characters evolve during adaptive radiation. In particular, whether the adaptive landscape can drive convergence of phenotypic integration (i.e., the pattern of phenotypic variation and covariation summarized in the P-matrix) is not well studied. We estimated and compared P for 19 morphological traits in eight species of Caribbean Anolis lizards, finding that similarity in P among species was not correlated with phylogenetic distance....

Data from: Factors leading to the evolution and maintenance of a male ornament in territorial species

Grace K. Charles & Terry J. Ord
Male ornamentation is assumed to have evolved primarily from selection by female mate choice. Yet this is only one possible reason for ornament evolution. Ornaments might also be useful in aggressive competition by improving opponent assessment between males, or they might function to enhance signal detection by making males more conspicuous in the environment. We tested both these ideas in territorial Anolis lizards in which female choice is either absent or secondary to males competing...

Data from: Wing patterning gene redefines the mimetic history of Heliconius butterflies

Heather M. Hines, Brian A. Counterman, Riccardo Papa, Priscila Albuquerque De Moura, Marcio Z. Cardoso, Mauricio Linares, James Mallet, Robert D. Reed, Chris D. Jiggins, Marcus R. Kronforst & W. Owen McMillan
The mimetic butterflies Heliconius erato and H. melpomene have undergone parallel radiations to form a near-identical patchwork of over 20 different wing pattern races across the Neotropics. Previous molecular phylogenetic work on these radiations has suggested that similar but geographically disjunct color patterns arose multiple times independently in each species. The neutral markers used in these studies, however, can move freely across color pattern boundaries and therefore might not represent the history of the adaptive...

Data from: Museum genomics: low-cost and high-accuracy genetic data from historical specimens

Kevin C. Rowe, Sonal Singhal, Matthew D. MacManes, Julien F. Ayroles, Toni Lyn Morelli, Emily M. Rubidge, Ke Bi & Craig C. Moritz
Natural history collections are unparalleled repositories of geographic and temporal variation in faunal conditions. Molecular studies offer an opportunity to uncover much of this variation; however, genetic studies of historical museum specimens typically rely on extracting highly degraded and chemically modified DNA samples from skins, skulls or other dried samples. Despite this limitation, obtaining short fragments of DNA sequences using traditional PCR amplification of DNA has been the primary method for genetic study of historical...

Data from: Molecular phylogeny and biogeography of Malagasy frogs of the genus Gephyromantis

Nathalie Kaffenberger, Katharina C. Wollenberg, Jörn Köhler, Frank Glaw, David R. Vieites & Miguel Vences
The genus Gephyromantis is a clade within the Malagasy–Comoroan family Mantellidae composed of rainforest frogs that live and breed to varying degrees independently from water. Based on DNA sequences of five mitochondrial and five nuclear genes we inferred the phylogeny of these frogs with full taxon coverage at the species level. Our preferred consensus tree from a partitioned Bayesian analysis of 5843 base pairs of 51 nominal and candidate species supports various major clades within...

Data from: Persistence of an extreme male-biased adult sex ratio in a natural population of polyandrous bird

András Kosztolányi, Zoltan Barta, Clemens Küpper & Tamás Székely
In a number of insects, fishes and birds the conventional sex roles are reversed: males are the main care provider whereas females focus on matings. The reversal of typical sex roles is an evolutionary puzzle, because it challenges the foundations of sex roles, sexual selection and parental investment theory. Recent theoretical models predict that biased parental care may be a response to biased adult sex ratios (ASRs). However, estimating ASR is challenging in natural populations,...

Data from: Major histocompatability complex variation in insular populations of the Egyptian vulture: inferences about the roles of genetic drift and selection

Rosa Agudo, Miguel Alcaide, Ciro Rico, Jesus Angel Lemus, Guillermo Blanco, Fernando Hiraldo & Jose Antonio Donázar
Insular populations have attracted the attention of evolutionary biologists because of their morphological and ecological peculiarities with respect to their mainland counterparts. Founder effects and genetic drift are known to distribute neutral genetic variability in these demes. However, elucidating whether these evolutionary forces have also shaped adaptive variation is crucial to evaluate the real impact of reduced genetic variation in small populations. Genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) are classical examples of evolutionarily relevant...

Registration Year

  • 2011
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • Harvard University
    12
  • Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales
    2
  • National Evolutionary Synthesis Center
    1
  • University of Bath
    1
  • Massachusetts General Hospital
    1
  • Duke University
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • Del Rosario University
    1
  • University of Cambridge
    1
  • University of Virginia
    1