20 Works

Data from: Examining the full effects of landscape heterogeneity on spatial genetic variation: a multiple matrix regression approach for quantifying geographic and ecological isolation

Ian J. Wang
Understanding the effects of landscape heterogeneity on spatial genetic variation is a primary goal of landscape genetics. Ecological and geographic variables can contribute to genetic structure through geographic isolation, in which geographic barriers and distances restrict gene flow, and ecological isolation, in which gene flow among populations inhabiting different environments is limited by selection against dispersers moving between them. Although methods have been developed to study geographic isolation in detail, ecological isolation has received much...

Data from: A NGS approach to the encrusting Mediterranean sponge Crella elegans (Porifera, Demospongiae, Poecilosclerida): transcriptome sequencing, characterization and overview of the gene expression along three life cycle stages

Alicia R. Pérez-Porro, Daniel Navarro-Gómez, Maria J. Uriz & Gonzalo Giribet
Sponges can be dominant organisms in many marine and freshwater habitats where they play essential ecological roles. They also represent a key group to address important questions in early metazoan evolution. Recent approaches for improving knowledge on sponge biological and ecological functions as well as on animal evolution have focused on the genetic toolkits involved in ecological responses to environmental changes (biotic and abiotic), development and reproduction. These approaches are possible thanks to newly available,...

Data from: Hybridization promotes color polymorphism in the aposematic harlequin poison frog, Oophaga histrionica

Iliana Medina, Ian J. Wang, Camilo Salazar & Adolfo Amezquita
Whether hybridization can be a mechanism that drives phenotypic diversity is a widely debated topic in evolutionary biology. In poison frogs (Dendrobatidae), assortative mating has been invoked to explain how new color morphs persist despite the expected homogenizing effects of natural selection. Here, we tested the complementary hypothesis that new morphs arise through hybridization between different color morphs. Specifically, we (1) reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships among the studied populations of a dart-poison frog to provide...

Data from: Early bursts of body size and shape evolution are rare in comparative data

Luke J. Harmon, Jonathan B. Losos, T. Jonathan Davies, Rosemary G. Gillespie, John L. Gittleman, W. Bryan Jennings, Kenneth H. Kozak, Mark A. McPeek, Franck Moreno-Roark, Thomas J. Near, Andy Purvis, Robert E. Ricklefs, Dolph Schluter, , Ole Seehausen, Brian L. Sidlauskas, Omar Torres-Carvajal, Jason T. Weir & Arne Ø. Mooers
George Gaylord Simpson famously postulated that much of life's diversity originated as adaptive radiations—more or less simultaneous divergences of numerous lines from a single ancestral adaptive type. However, identifying adaptive radiations has proven difficult due to a lack of broad-scale comparative datasets. Here, we use phylogenetic comparative data on body size and shape in a diversity of animal clades to test a key model of adaptive radiation, in which initially rapid morphological evolution is followed...

Data from: Sign epistasis limits evolutionary trade-offs at the confluence of single- and multi-carbon metabolism in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1

Sean Michael Carroll, Ming-Chun Lee & Christopher James Marx
Adaptation of one set of traits is often accompanied by attenuation of traits important in other selective environments, leading to fitness trade-offs. The mechanisms that either promote or prevent the emergence of trade-offs remain largely unknown, and are difficult to discern in most systems. Here, we investigate the basis of trade-offs that emerged during experimental evolution of Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 to distinct growth substrates. After 1500 generations of adaptation to a multi-carbon substrate, succinate (S),...

Data from: Major histocompatibility complex class I evolution in songbirds: universal primers, rapid evolution and base compositional shifts in exon 3

Miguel Alcaide, Mark Liu & Scott V. Edwards
Genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) have become an important marker for the investigation of adaptive genetic variation in vertebrates because of their critical role in pathogen resistance. However, despite significant advances in the last few years the characterization of MHC variation in non-model species still remains a challenging task due to the redundancy and high variation of this gene complex. Here we report the utility of a single pair of primers for the...

Data from: Does moonlight increase predation risk? Meta-analysis reveals divergent responses of nocturnal mammals to lunar cycles

Laura R. Prugh & Christopher D. Golden
1. The risk of predation strongly affects mammalian population dynamics and community interactions. Bright moonlight is widely believed to increase predation risk for nocturnal mammals by increasing the ability of predators to detect prey, but the potential for moonlight to increase detection of predators and the foraging efficiency of prey has largely been ignored. Studies have reported highly variable responses to moonlight among species, calling into question the assumption that moonlight increases risk. 2. Here,...

Data from: Characterizing the plasticity of nitrogen metabolism by the host and symbionts of the hydrothermal vent chemoautotrophic symbioses Ridgeia piscesae

Liao Li, Scott D. Wankel, Wu Min, Colleen M. Cavanaugh, Peter R. Girguis & Min Wu
Chemoautotrophic symbionts of deep sea hydrothermal vent tubeworms are known to provide their hosts with all their primary nutrition. While studies have examined how chemoautotrophic symbionts provide the association with nitrogen, fewer have examined if symbiont nitrogen metabolism varies as a function of environmental conditions. Ridgeia piscesae tubeworms flourish at Northeastern Pacific vents, occupy a range of microhabitats, and exhibit a high degree of morphological plasticity [e.g. long-skinny (LS) and short-fat (SF) phenotypes] that may...

Data from: Multilocus tests of Pleistocene refugia and ancient divergence in a pair of Atlantic Forest antbirds (Myrmeciza)

Fábio Raposo Do Amaral, Patrick K. Albers, Scott V. Edwards & Cristina Y. Miyaki
The Atlantic Forest (AF) harbors one of the most diverse vertebrate faunas of the world, including 199 endemic species of birds. Understanding the evolutionary processes behind such diversity has become the focus of many recent, primarily single locus, phylogeographic studies. These studies suggest that isolation in forest refugia may have been a major mechanism promoting diversification, although there is also support for a role of riverine and geotectonic barriers, two sets of hypotheses that can...

Data from: The biomechanical basis of evolutionary change in a territorial display

Terry J. Ord, David C. Collar & Thomas J. Sanger
1. Few studies have examined how the anatomy of an animal signal contributes to, or limits, the evolution of signal differentiation among closely related species. 2. In Anolis lizards, adult males extend a large, conspicuous dewlap as part of a territorial advertisement display. Males of species from the island of Jamaica rely on the rapid extension of the dewlap to facilitate display detection by territorial neighbours and conspecific females. Males of other species on the...

Data from: Exceptional convergence on the macroevolutionary landscape in island lizard radiations

D. Luke Mahler, Travis Ingram, Liam J. Revell & Jonathan B. Losos
G. G. Simpson, one of the chief architects of evolutionary biology’s modern synthesis, proposed that diversification occurs on a macroevolutionary adaptive landscape, but landscape models are seldom used to study adaptive divergence in large radiations. We show that for Caribbean Anolis lizards, diversification on similar Simpsonian landscapes leads to striking convergence of entire faunas on four islands. Parallel radiations unfolding at large temporal scales shed light on the process of adaptive diversification, indicating that the...

Data from: Divergence in coloration and the evolution of reproductive isolation in the Anolis marmoratus species complex

Martha M. Muñoz, Nicholas G. Crawford, , Nicholas J. Messana, Rebecca D. Tarvin, Liam J. Revell, Rosanne M. Zandvliet, Juanita M. Hopwood, Elbert Mock, André L. Schneider, Chris J. Schneider, Thomas J. McGreevy & Christopher J. Schneider
Adaptive divergence in coloration is expected to produce reproductive isolation in species that use colorful signals in mate choice and species recognition. Indeed, many adaptive radiations are characterized by differentiation in colorful signals, suggesting that divergent selection acting on coloration may be an important component of speciation. Populations in the Anolis marmoratus species complex from the Caribbean island of Guadeloupe display striking divergence in adult male color and pattern that occurs over small geographic distances,...

Data from: Rarefaction and extrapolation with Hill numbers: a framework for sampling and estimation in species diversity studies

Anne Chao, Nicholas J. Gotelli, T. C. Hsieh, Elizabeth L. Sander, K. H. Ma, Robert K. Colwell & Aaron M. Ellison
Quantifying and assessing changes in biological diversity are central aspects of many ecological studies, yet accurate methods of estimating biological diversity from sampling data have been elusive. Hill numbers, or the effective number of species, are increasingly used to characterize the taxonomic, phylogenetic, or functional diversity of an assemblage. However, empirical estimates of Hill numbers, including species richness, tend to be an increasing function of sampling effort and, thus, tend to increase with sample completeness....

Data from: Convergent evolution in the territorial communication of a classic adaptive radiation: Caribbean Anolis lizards

Terry J. Ord, Judy A. Stamps & Jonathan B. Losos
To demonstrate adaptive convergent evolution, it must be shown that shared phenotypes have evolved independently in different lineages and that a credible selection pressure underlies adaptive evolution. There are a number of robust examples of adaptive convergence in morphology for which both these criteria have been met, but examples from animal behaviour have rarely been tested as rigorously. Adaptive convergence should be common in behaviour, especially behaviour used for communication, because the environment often shapes...

Data from: RADseq underestimates diversity and introduces genealogical biases due to nonrandom haplotype sampling

Brian Arnold, Russ B. Corbett-Detig, Daniel Hartl & Kirsten Bomblies
Reduced representation genome-sequencing approaches based on restriction digestion are enabling large-scale marker generation and facilitating genomic studies in a wide range of model and nonmodel systems. However, sampling chromosomes based on restriction digestion may introduce a bias in allele frequency estimation due to polymorphisms in restriction sites. To explore the effects of this nonrandom sampling and its sensitivity to different evolutionary parameters, we developed a coalescent-simulation framework to mimic the biased recovery of chromosomes in...

Data from: Ecological and genetic factors influencing the transition between host-use strategies in sympatric Heliconius butterflies

Richard M. Merrill, Russell E. Naisbit, James Mallet & Chris D. Jiggins
Shifts in host-plant use by phytophagous insects have played a central role in their diversification. Evolving host-use strategies will reflect a trade-off between selection pressures. The ecological niche of herbivorous insects is partitioned along several dimensions, and if populations remain in contact, recombination will break down associations between relevant loci. As such, genetic architecture can profoundly affect the coordinated divergence of traits and subsequently the ability to exploit novel habitats. The closely related species Heliconius...

Data from: Boom and bust: ancient and recent diversification in bichirs (Polypteridae: Actinopterygii), a relictual lineage of ray-finned fishes

Thomas J. Near, Alex Dornburg, Masayoshi Tokita, Dai Suzuki, Matthew C. Brandley & Matt Friedman
Understanding the history that underlies patterns of species richness across the Tree of Life requires an investigation of the mechanisms that not only generate young species-rich clades, but also those that maintain species-poor lineages over long stretches of evolutionary time. However, diversification dynamics that underlie ancient species-poor lineages are often hidden due to a lack of fossil evidence. Using information from the fossil record and time calibrated molecular phylogenies, we investigate the history of lineage...

Data from: Stability and phylogenetic correlation in gut microbiota: lessons from ants and apes

Jon G. Sanders, Scott Powell, Daniel J. C. Kronaue, Heraldo L. Vasconcelos, Megan E. Fredrickson, Naomi E. Pierce, Daniel J. C. Kronauer & Megan E. Frederickson
Correlation between gut microbiota and host phylogeny could reflect codiversification over shared evolutionary history or a selective environment that is more similar in related hosts. These alternatives imply substantial differences in the relationship between host and symbiont, but can they be distinguished based on patterns in the community data themselves? We explored patterns of phylogenetic correlation in the distribution of gut bacteria among species of turtle ants (genus Cephalotes), which host a dense gut microbial...

Data from: Advancing population ecology with integral projection models: a practical guide

Cory Merow, Johan P. Dalgren, C. Jessica E. Metcalf, Dylan Z. Childs, M. E. K. Evans, Eelke Jongejans, Sydne Record, Mark Rees, Roberto Salguero-Gómez, Sean M. McMahon, Margaret E.K. Evans & Johan P. Dahlgren
Integral Projection Models (IPMs) use information on how an individual's state influences its vital rates - survival, growth and reproduction - to make population projections. IPMs are constructed from regression models predicting vital rates from state variables (e.g., size or age) and covariates (e.g., environment). By combining regressions of vital rates, an IPM provides mechanistic insight into emergent ecological patterns such as population dynamics, species geographic distributions, or life history strategies. Here, we review important...

Data from: Convergent evolution of sexual dimorphism in skull shape using distinct developmental strategies

Emma Sherratt, Joel William McGlothlin, , Jonathan B. Losos, Arhat Abzhanov, Thomas J. Sanger & Edmund D. Brodie
Studies integrating evolutionary and developmental analyses of morphological variation are of growing interest to biologists as they promise to shed fresh light on the mechanisms of morphological diversification. Sexually dimorphic traits tend to be incredibly divergent across taxa. Such diversification must arise through evolutionary modifications to sex differences during development. Nevertheless, few studies of dimorphism have attempted to synthesize evolutionary and developmental perspectives. Using geometric morphometric analysis of head shape for 50 Anolis species, we...

Registration Year

  • 2013
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Harvard University
    20
  • University of Connecticut
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  • UNSW Sydney
    2
  • Yale University
    2
  • University of Massachusetts Boston
    2
  • University of Oxford
    2
  • National Evolutionary Synthesis Center
    1
  • Zhejiang University
    1
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    1
  • Kyushu University
    1