45 Works

Data from: Beyond animals and plants: dynamic maternal effects in the fungus Neurospora crassa

Kolea C. K. Zimmerman, Daniel A. Levitis & Anne Pringle
Maternal effects are widely documented in animals and plants, but not in fungi or other eukaryotes. A principal cause of maternal effects is asymmetrical parental investment in a zygote, creating greater maternal versus paternal influence on offspring phenotypes. Asymmetrical investments are not limited to animals and plants, but are also prevalent in fungi and groups including apicomplexans, dinoflagellates, and red algae. Evidence suggesting maternal effects among fungi is sparse and anecdotal. In an experiment designed...

Data from: Modelling tooth–prey interactions in sharks: the importance of dynamic testing

Katherine A. Corn, Stacy C. Farina, Jeffrey Brash & Adam P. Summers
The shape of shark teeth varies among species, but traditional testing protocols have revealed no predictive relationship between shark tooth morphology and performance. We developed a dynamic testing device to quantify cutting performance of teeth. We mimicked head-shaking behaviour in feeding large sharks by attaching teeth to the blade of a reciprocating power saw fixed in a custom-built frame. We tested three tooth types at biologically relevant speeds and found differences in tooth cutting ability...

Data from: Testing the Münch hypothesis of long distance phloem transport in plants

Michael Knoblauch, Jan Knoblauch, Daniel L Mullendore, Jessica A Savage, Benjamin A Babst, Sierra D Beecher, Adam C Dodgen, Kaare H Jensen & Noel Michele Holbrook
Long distance transport in plants occurs in sieve tubes of the phloem. The pressure flow hypothesis introduced by Ernst Münch in 1930 describes a mechanism of osmotically generated pressure differentials that are supposed to drive the movement of sugars and other solutes in the phloem, but this hypothesis has long faced major challenges. The key issue is whether the conductance of sieve tubes, including sieve plate pores, is sufficient to allow pressure flow. We show...

Data from: Whole organism lineage tracing by combinatorial and cumulative genome editing

Aaron McKenna, Gregory M. Findlay, James A. Gagnon, Marshall S. Horwitz, Alexander Franz Schier & Jay Shendure
Multicellular systems develop from single cells through distinct lineages. However, current lineage-tracing approaches scale poorly to whole, complex organisms. Here, we use genome editing to progressively introduce and accumulate diverse mutations in a DNA barcode over multiple rounds of cell division. The barcode, an array of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 target sites, marks cells and enables the elucidation of lineage relationships via the patterns of mutations shared between cells. In cell culture...

Data from: A collection of non-human primate computed tomography scans housed in MorphoSource, a repository for 3D data

Lynn E. Copes, Lynn M. Lucas, James D. Thostenson, Hopi E. Hoekstra & Douglas M. Boyer
A dataset of high-resolution microCT scans of primate skulls (crania and mandibles) and certain postcranial elements was collected to address questions about primate skull morphology. The sample consists of 489 scans taken from 431 specimens, representing 53 species of most Primate families. These data have transformative reuse potential as such datasets are necessary for conducting high power research into primate evolution, but require significant time and funding to collect. Similar datasets were previously only available...

Data from: Biodiversity as a multidimensional construct: a review, framework and case study of herbivory's impact on plant biodiversity

S. Naeem, Case Prager, Brian Weeks, Alex Varga, Dan F.B. Flynn, Kevin Griffin, Robert Muscarella, Matthew Palmer, Stephen Wood, William Schuster & Dan F. B. Flynn
Biodiversity is inherently multidimensional, encompassing taxonomic, functional, phylogenetic, genetic, landscape and many other elements of variability of life on the Earth. However, this fundamental principle of multidimensionality is rarely applied in research aimed at understanding biodiversity's value to ecosystem functions and the services they provide. This oversight means that our current understanding of the ecological and environmental consequences of biodiversity loss is limited primarily to what unidimensional studies have revealed. To address this issue, we...

Data from: Correlated evolution of body and fin morphology in the cichlid fishes

Kara L. Feilich
Body and fin shape are chief determinants of swimming performance in fishes. Different configurations of body and fin shape can suit different locomotor specializations. The success of any configuration is dependent upon the hydrodynamic interactions between body and fins. Despite the importance of body-fin interactions for swimming, there are few data indicating whether body and fin configurations evolve in concert, or whether these structures vary independently. The cichlid fishes are a diverse family whose well-studied...

Data from: Foraging at the edge of the world: low‐altitude, high‐speed maneuvering in barn swallows

Douglas R. Warrick, Tyson L. Hedrick, Andrew A. Biewener, Kristen E. Crandell & Bret W. Tobalske
While prior studies of swallow manoeuvering have focused on slow-speed flight and obstacle avoidance in still air, swallows survive by foraging at high speeds in windy environments. Recent advances in field-portable, high-speed video systems, coupled with precise anemometry, permit measures of high-speed aerial performance of birds in a natural state. We undertook the present study to test: (i) the manner in which barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) may exploit wind dynamics and ground effect while foraging...

Data from: Ecological specialization and morphological diversification in Greater Antillean boas

Robert G. Reynolds, David C. Collar, Stesha A. Pasachnik, Matthew L. Niemiller, Alberto R. Puente-Rolon & Liam J. Revell
Colonization of islands can dramatically influence the evolutionary trajectories of organisms, with both deterministic and stochastic processes driving adaptation and diversification. Some island colonists evolve extremely large or small body sizes, presumably in response to unique ecological circumstances present on islands. One example of this phenomenon, the Greater Antillean boas, includes both small (<90 cm) and large (4 m) species occurring on the Greater Antilles and Bahamas, with some islands supporting pairs or trios of...

Data from: How chimpanzees integrate sensory information to select figs

Nathaniel J. Dominy, Justin D. Yeakel, Uttam Bhat, Lawrence Ramsden, Richard W. Wrangham & Peter W. Lucas
Figs are keystone resources that sustain chimpanzees when preferred fruits are scarce. Many figs retain a green(ish) colour throughout development, a pattern that causes chimpanzees to evaluate edibility on the basis of achromatic accessory cues. Such behaviour is conspicuous because it entails a succession of discrete sensory assessments, including the deliberate palpation of individual figs, a task that requires advanced visuomotor control. These actions are strongly suggestive of domain-specific information processing and decision-making, and they...

Data from: Optimal frequency of rabies vaccination campaigns in Sub-Saharan Africa

Alyssa M. Bilinski, Meagan C. Fitzpatrick, Charles E. Rupprecht, A. David Paltiel & Alison P. Galvani
Rabies causes more than 24 000 human deaths annually in Sub-Saharan Africa. The World Health Organization recommends annual canine vaccination campaigns with at least 70% coverage to control the disease. While previous studies have considered optimal coverage of animal rabies vaccination, variation in the frequency of vaccination campaigns has not been explored. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of rabies canine vaccination campaigns at varying coverage and frequency, we parametrized a rabies virus transmission model to two...

Data from: Distinctive fungal communities in an obligate African ant-plant mutualism

Christopher C.M. Baker, Dino J. Martins, Julianne N. Pelaez, Johan P.J. Billen, Anne Pringle, Megan E. Frederickson, Naomi E. Pierce, Christopher C. M. Baker & Johan P. J. Billen
Three ant species nest obligately in the swollen-thorn domatia of the African ant-plant Vachellia (Acacia) drepanolobium, a model system for the study of ant-defence mutualisms and species coexistence. Here we report on the characteristic fungal communities generated by these ant species in their domatia. First, we describe behavioural differences between the ant species when presented with a cultured fungal isolate in the laboratory. Second, we use DNA metabarcoding to show that each ant species has...

Data from: The abiotic and biotic drivers of rapid diversification in Andean bellflowers (Campanulaceae)

Laura P. Lagomarsino, Fabien L. Condamine, Alexandre Antonelli, Andreas Mulch & Charles C. Davis
The tropical Andes of South America, the world’s richest biodiversity hotspot, are home to many rapid radiations. While geological, climatic, and ecological processes collectively explain such radiations, their relative contributions are seldom examined within a single clade. We explore the contribution of these factors by applying a series of diversification models that incorporate mountain building, climate change, and trait evolution to the first dated phylogeny of Andean bellflowers (Campanulaceae: Lobelioideae). Our framework is novel for...

Data from: SNPs across time and space: population genomic signatures of founder events and epizootics in the House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus)

Allison J. Shultz, Allan J. Baker, Geoffrey E. Hill, Paul M. Nolan & Scott V. Edwards
Identifying genomic signatures of natural selection can be challenging against a background of demographic changes such as bottlenecks and population expansions. Here, we disentangle the effects of demography from selection in the House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) using samples collected before and after a pathogen-induced selection event. Using ddRADseq, we genotyped over 18,000 SNPs across the genome in native pre-epizootic western US birds, introduced birds from Hawaii and the eastern United States, post-epizootic eastern birds, and...

Data from: Eighty-five million years of Pacific Ocean gyre ecosystem structure: long-term stability marked by punctuated change

Elizabeth Sibert, Richard Norris, Jose M. Cuevas, Lana G. Graves & Jose Cuevas
While the history of taxonomic diversification in open ocean lineages of ray-finned fish and elasmobranchs is increasingly known, the evolution of their roles within the open ocean ecosystem remains poorly understood. To assess the relative importance of these groups through time, we measured the accumulation rate of microfossil fish teeth and elasmobranch dermal denticles (ichthyoliths) in deep-sea sediment cores from the North and South Pacific gyres over the past 85 million years (Myr). We find...

Data from: Infectious disease, behavioural flexibility, and the evolution of culture in primates

Collin M. McCabe, Simon M. Reader & Charles L. Nunn
Culturally transmitted traits are observed in a wide array of animal species, yet we understand little about the costs of the behavioural patterns that underlie culture, such as innovation and social learning. We propose that infectious diseases are a significant cost associated with cultural transmission. We investigated two hypotheses that may explain such a connection: that social learning and exploratory behaviours (specifically, innovation and extractive foraging) either compensate for existing infection or increase exposure to...

Data from: Archaeogenomic evidence reveals prehistoric matrilineal dynasty

Douglas J. Kennett, Stephen Plog, Richard J. George, Brendan J. Culleton, Adam S. Watson, Pontus Skoglund, Nadin Rohland, Swapan Mallick, Kristin Stewardson, Logan Kistler, Steven A. LeBlanc, Peter M. Whiteley, David Reich & George H. Perry
For societies with writing systems, hereditary leadership is documented as one of the hallmarks of early political complexity and governance. In contrast, it is unknown whether hereditary succession played a role in the early formation of prehistoric complex societies that lacked writing. Here we use an archaeogenomic approach to identify an elite matriline that persisted between 800 and 1130 CE in Chaco Canyon, the centre of an expansive prehistoric complex society in the Southwestern United...

Data from: Gut microbiota of dung beetles correspond to dietary specializations of adults and larvae

Shantanu P. Shukla, Jon G. Sanders, Marcus J. Byrne & Naomi E. Pierce
Vertebrate dung is central to the dung beetle life cycle, constituting food for adults and a protective and nutritive refuge for their offspring. Adult dung beetles have soft mandibles and feed primarily on nutritionally rich dung particles, while larvae have sclerotized mandibles and consume coarser dung particles with a higher C/N ratio. Here, using the dung beetles Euoniticellus intermedius and E. triangulatus, we show that these morphological adaptations in mandibular structure are also correlated with...

Data from: Rhesus monkeys show human-like changes in gaze following across the lifespan

Alexandra G. Rosati, Alyssa M. Arre, Michael L. Platt & Laurie R. Santos
Gaze following, or co-orienting with others, is a foundational skill for human social behavior. The emergence of this capacity scaffolds critical human-specific abilities such as theory of mind and language. Nonhuman primates also follow others’ gaze, but less is known about how the cognitive mechanisms supporting this behavior develop over the lifespan. Here we experimentally tested gaze following in 481 semi-free-ranging rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) ranging from infancy to old age. We found that monkeys...

Data from: Optimal switching between geocentric and egocentric strategies in navigation

Orit Peleg & L. Mahadevan
Animals use a combination of egocentric navigation driven by the internal integration of environmental cues, interspersed with geocentric course correction and reorientation. These processes are accompanied by uncertainty in sensory acquisition of information, planning and execution. Inspired by observations of dung beetle navigational strategies that show switching between geocentric and egocentric strategies, we consider the question of optimal reorientation rates for the navigation of an agent moving along a preferred direction in the presence of...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    45

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    45

Affiliations

  • Harvard University
    45
  • University of Toronto
    3
  • Yale University
    3
  • Harvard Medical School
    3
  • University of Washington
    2
  • InterAmerican University of Puerto Rico
    2
  • Oregon State University
    2
  • University of North Carolina
    2
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    2
  • Pontifical Catholic University of Peru
    1