57 Works

Data from: Estimating encounter rates as the first step of sexual selection in the lizard Anolis sagrei

Ambika Kamath & Jonathan B. Losos
How individuals move through their environment dictates which other individuals they encounter, determining their social and reproductive interactions and the extent to which they experience sexual selection. Specifically, females rarely have the option of mating with all males in a population—they can only choose among the males they encounter. Further, quantifying phenotypic differences between the males that females encounter and those that sire females’ offspring lends insight into how social and reproductive interactions shape male...

Data from: Sequence capture phylogenomics of eyeless Cicurina spiders from Texas caves, with emphasis on US federally-endangered species from Bexar County (Araneae, Hahniidae)

Marshal Hedin, Shahan Derkarabetian, Jennifer Blair & Pierre Paquin
We combined morphological, mitochondrial, and nuclear phylogenomic data to address phylogenetic and species delimitation questions in cave-limited Cicurina spiders from central Texas. We focused special effort on specimens and cave locations in the San Antonio region (Bexar County), home to four eyeless species listed as US Federally Endangered. Our sequence capture experiments resulted in the recovery of ~ 200-400 homologous ultra-conserved element (UCE) nuclear loci across taxa, and nearly complete COI mitochondrial DNA sequences from...

Data from: Chimpanzee cooperation is fast, and independent from self-control

Alexandra G. Rosati, Lauren M. DiNicola & Joshua W. Buckholtz
Large-scale cooperation is a hallmark of our species and appears to be unique among primates. Yet the evolutionary mechanisms that drove the emergence of humanlike patterns of cooperation remain unclear. Studying the cognitive processes underlying cooperative behavior in apes, our closest living relatives, can help identify these mechanisms. Accordingly, we employed a novel test battery to assess the willingness of 40 chimpanzees to donate resources, instrumentally help others, and punish a culpable thief. We found...

Data from: The UBR-1 ubiquitin ligase regulates glutamate metabolism to generate coordinated motor pattern in Caenorhabditis elegans

Jysothna Chitturi, Wesley Hung, Anas M. Abdel Rahman, Min Wu, Maria A. Lim, John Calarco, Rene Baran, Xun Huang, James W. Dennis, Mei Zhen & Jyothsna Chitturi
UBR1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase best known for its ability to target protein degradation by the N-end rule. The physiological functions of UBR family proteins, however, remain not fully understood. We found that the functional loss of C. elegans UBR-1 leads to synchronized motor neuron activation, preventing body bending when animals generate reversal movements. This motor deficit is rescued by removing GOT-1, a transaminase that converts aspartate to glutamate. Both UBR-1 and GOT-1 are...

Data from: Correlated evolution of self and interspecific incompatibility across the range of a Texas wildflower

Federico Roda & Robin Hopkins
Selection to prevent interspecific mating can cause an increase or a decrease in self pollination in sympatric populations. Characterizing geographic variation in self and interspecific incompatibilities within a species can reveal if and how the evolution of self and interspecific mate choice are linked. • We used controlled pollinations to characterize variation in self and interspecific incompatibility across 29 populations of Phlox drummondii. We evaluated seed set from these pollinations and described the developmental timing...

Data from: Anchored phylogenomics illuminates the skipper butterfly tree of life

Emmanuel F.A. Toussaint, Jesse W. Breinholt, Chandra Earl, Andrew D. Warren, Andrew V.Z. Brower, Masaya Yago, Kelly M. Dexter, Marianne Espeland, Naomi E. Pierce, David J. Lohman & Akito Y. Kawahara
Butterflies (Papilionoidea) are perhaps the most charismatic insect lineage, yet phylogenetic relationships among them remain incompletely studied and controversial. We sequenced nearly 400 loci using Anchored Hybrid Enrichment and sampled all tribes and more than 120 genera of skippers (Hesperiidae), one of the most species-rich and poorly studied butterfly families. Maximum-likelihood, parsimony and coalescent multi-species methods all converged on a novel, robust phylogenetic hypothesis for skippers. Different optimality criteria and methodologies recovered almost identical phylogenetic...

Data from: Two pulses of morphological diversification in Pacific pelagic fishes following the Cretaceous–Palaeogene mass extinction

Elizabeth Sibert, Matthew Friedman, Pincelli Hull, Gene Hunt, Richard Norris & Matt Friedman
Molecular phylogenies suggest some major radiations of open-ocean fish clades occurred roughly coincident with the K/Pg boundary, however the timing and nature of this diversification is poorly constrained. Here we investigate evolutionary patterns in ray-finned fishes across the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K/Pg) Mass Extinction 66 million years ago (Ma), using microfossils (isolated teeth) preserved in a South Pacific sediment core spanning 72-43 Ma. Our record does not show significant turnover of fish tooth morphotypes at the K/Pg...

Data from: Variation in context-dependent foraging behavior across pollinators

Heather M. Briggs, Stuart Graham, Callin M. Switzer & Robin Hopkins
Pollinator foraging behavior has direct consequences for plant reproduction and has been implicated in driving floral trait evolution. Exploring the degree to which pollinators exhibit flexibility in foraging behavior will add to a mechanistic understanding of how pollinators can impose selection on plant traits. Although plants have evolved suites of floral traits to attract pollinators, flower color is a particularly important aspect of the floral display. Some pollinators show strong innate color preference, but many...

Data from: Fossils reveal the complex evolutionary history of the mammalian regionalized spine

Katrina Elizabeth Jones, K. D. Angielczyk, P. D. Polly, J. J. Head, V. Fernandez, J. K. Lungmus, S. Tulga & S. E. Pierce
A unique characteristic of mammals is a vertebral column with anatomically distinct regions, but when and how this trait evolved remains unknown. Here we reconstruct vertebral regions and their morphological disparity in the extinct forerunners of mammals, the non-mammalian synapsids, to elucidate the evolution of mammalian axial differentiation. Mapping patterns of regionalization and disparity (heterogeneity) across amniotes reveals that both traits increased during synapsid evolution. However, the onset of regionalization predates increased heterogeneity. Based on...

Data from: Ancient mechanisms for the evolution of the bicoid homeodomain's function in fly development

Qinwen Liu, Pinar Onal, Rhea R. Datta, Julia M. Rogers, Urs Schmidt-Ott, Martha L. Bulyk, Stephen Small & Joseph W. Thornton
The ancient mechanisms that caused developmental gene regulatory networks to diversify among distantly related taxa are not well understood. Here we use ancestral protein reconstruction, biochemical experiments, and developmental assays of transgenic animals carrying reconstructed ancestral genes to investigate how the transcription factor Bicoid (Bcd) evolved its central role in anterior-posterior patterning in flies. We show that most of Bcd's derived functions are attributable to evolutionary changes within its homeodomain (HD) during a phylogenetic interval...

Data from: A coalescent-based estimator of genetic drift, and acoustic divergence in the Pteronotus parnellii species complex

Liliana M Davalos, Winston C Lancaster, Miguel S Nunez Novas, Yolanda M Leon, Bonnie R Lei, Jon Flanders & Amy L Russell
Determining the processes responsible for phenotypic variation is one of the central tasks of evolutionary biology. While the importance of acoustic traits for foraging and communication in echolocating mammals suggests adaptation, the seldom-tested null hypothesis to explain trait divergence is genetic drift. Here we derive FST values from multi-locus coalescent isolation-with-migration models, and couple them with estimates of quantitative trait divergence, or PST, to test drift as the evolutionary process responsible for phenotypic divergence in...

Data from: Predator-driven natural selection on risk-taking behavior in anole lizards

Oriol Lapiedra, Thomas W. Schoener, Manuel Leal, Jonathan B. Losos & Jason J. Kolbe
Biologists have long debated the role of behavior in evolution, yet understanding of its role as a driver of adaptation is hampered by the scarcity of experimental studies of natural selection on behavior in nature. After showing that individual Anolis sagrei lizards vary consistently in risk-taking behaviors, we experimentally established populations on eight small islands either with or without Leiocephalus carinatus, a major ground predator. We found that selection predictably favors different risk-taking behaviors under...

Data from: Support for a clade of Placozoa and Cnidaria in genes with minimal compositional bias

Christopher E. Laumer, Harald Gruber-Vodicka, Michael G. Hadfield, Vicki B. Pearse, Ana Riesgo, John C. Marioni & Gonzalo Giribet
The phylogenetic placement of the morphologically simple placozoans is crucial to understanding the evolution of complex animal traits. Here, we examine the influence of adding new genomes from placozoans to a large dataset designed to study the deepest splits in the animal phylogeny. Using site-heterogeneous substitution models, we show that it is possible to obtain strong support, in both amino acid and reduced-alphabet matrices, for either a sister-group relationship between Cnidaria and Placozoa, or for...

Data from: Multifactorial processes underlie parallel opsin loss in neotropical bats

Alexa Sadier, Kalina T. J. Davies, Laurel R. Yohe, Kun Yun, Paul Donat, Brandon P. Hedrick, Elizabeth R. Dumont, Liliana M. Davalos, Stephen J. Rossiter & Karen E. Sears
The loss of previously adaptive traits is typically linked to relaxation in selection, yet the molecular steps leading to such repeated losses are rarely known. Molecular studies of loss have tended to focus on gene sequences alone, but overlooking other aspects of protein expression might underestimate phenotypic diversity. Insights based almost solely on opsin gene evolution, for instance, have made mammalian color vision a textbook example of phenotypic loss. We address this gap by investigating...

Data from: Identification of a transporter complex responsible for the cytosolic entry of nitrogen-containing-bisphosphonates

Zhou Yu, Lauren E. Surface, Chong Yon Park, Max A Horlbeck, Gregory A Wyant, Monther Abu-Remaileh, Timothy R. Peterson, David M. Sabatini, Jonathan S. Weissman & Erin K. O'Shea
Nitrogen-containing-bisphosphonates (N-BPs) are widely prescribed to treat osteoporosis and other bone-related diseases. Although previous studies established that N-BPs function by inhibiting the mevalonate pathway in osteoclasts, the mechanism by which N-BPs enter the cytosol from the extracellular space to reach their molecular target is not understood. Here we implemented a CRISPRi-mediated genome-wide screen and identified SLC37A3 (solute carrier family 37 member A3) as a gene required for the action of N-BPs in mammalian cells. We...

Data from: Herbarium specimens reveal increasing herbivory over the past century

Emily K. Meineke, Aimee T. Classen, Nathan J. Sanders & T. Jonathan Davies
Predicting how ecological interactions will respond to global change is a major challenge. Plants and their associated insect herbivores compose much of macroscopic diversity, yet how their interactions have been altered by recent environmental change remains underexplored. To address this gap, we quantified herbivory on herbarium specimens of four plant species with records extending back 112 years. Our study focused on the northeastern US, where temperatures have increased rapidly over the last few decades. This...

Data from: Social behavior in bees influences the abundance of Sodalis (Enterobacteriaceae) symbionts

Benjamin E. R. Rubin, Jon G. Sanders, Kyle M. Turner, Naomi E. Pierce & Sarah D. Kocher
Social interactions can facilitate transmission of microbes between individuals, reducing variation in gut communities within social groups. Thus, the evolution of social behaviors and symbiont community composition have the potential to be tightly linked. We explored this connection by characterizing the diversity of bacteria associated with both eusocial and solitary bee species within the behaviorally variable family Halictidae using 16S amplicon sequencing. Contrary to expectations, we found few differences in bacterial abundance or variation between...

Data from: Locality or habitat? Exploring predictors of biodiversity in Amazonia

Camila D. Ritter, Alexander Zizka, Christopher Barnes, R. Henrik Nilsson, Fabian Roger & Alexandre Antonelli
Amazonia is an environmentally heterogeneous and biologically megadiverse region, and its biodiversity varies considerably over space. However, existing knowledge on Amazonian biodiversity and its environmental determinants stems almost exclusively from studies of macroscopic above‐ground organisms, notably vertebrates and trees. In contrast, diversity patterns of most other organisms remain elusive, although some of them, for instance microorganisms, constitute the overwhelming majority of taxa in any given location, both in terms of diversity and abundance. Here, we...

Data from: The spectre of too many species

Adam D. Leache, Tianqi Zhu, Bruce Rannala & Ziheng Yang
Recent simulation studies examining the performance of Bayesian species delimitation as implemented in the BPP program have suggested that BPP may detect population splits but not species divergences and that it tends to over-split when data of many loci are analyzed. Here we confirm these results and provide the mathematical justifications. We point out that the distinction between population and species splits made in the protracted speciation model has no influence on the generation of...

Data from: Structural complexity of hunting habitat and territoriality increase the reversed sexual size dimorphism in diurnal raptors

Lorenzo Pérez-Camacho, Sara Martínez-Hesterkamp, Salvador Rebollo, Gonzalo García-Salgado & Ignacio Morales-Castilla
Despite numerous efforts and many hypotheses to explain the selective pressures that may have favoured reversed sexual dimorphism (RSD) in raptors ‐ i.e. that the female is larger than the male ‐ some drivers of RSD are still unknown. Here we analyse how much variation in RSD is explained by hunting habitat structure, territoriality or territory size. We do so using data on diurnal raptors from the New World and the Western Palearctic – i.e....

Data from: The relationship between post-mating reproductive isolation and reinforcement in Phlox

Sevan S. Suni & Robin Hopkins
The process of speciation involves the accumulation of reproductive isolation (RI) between diverging lineages. Selection can favor increased RI via the process of reinforcement, whereby costs to hybridization impose selection for increased prezygotic RI. Reinforcement results in phenotypic divergence within at least one taxon, as a result of costly hybridization between sympatric taxa. The strength of selection driving reinforcement is determined by the cost of hybridization and the frequency of hybridization. We investigated the cost...

Data from: GlobTherm, a global database on thermal tolerances for aquatic and terrestrial organisms

Joanne M. Bennett, Piero Calosi, Susana Clusella-Trullas, Brezo Martínez, Jennifer Sunday, Adam C. Algar, Miguel B. Araújo, Bradford A. Hawkins, Sally Keith, Ingolf Kühn, Carsten Rahbek, Laura Rodríguez, Alexander Singer, Fabricio Villalobos, Miguel Ángel Olalla-Tárraga & Ignacio Morales-Castilla
How climate affects species distributions is a longstanding question receiving renewed interest owing to the need to predict the impacts of global warming on biodiversity. Is climate change forcing species to live near their critical thermal limits? Are these limits likely to change through natural selection? These and other important questions can be addressed with models relating geographical distributions of species with climate data, but inferences made with these models are highly contingent on non-climatic...

Data from: Prolific fruit output by the invader Bellucia pentamera (Melastomataceae) is enhanced by selective logging disturbance

Christopher Dillis, Andrew J. Marshall, Campbell O. Webb & Mark N. Grote
Selective logging in tropical rain forests may promote population growth of invasive plants. The ability of invaders to respond, specifically in reproductive traits, to increases in resource abundance may allow them to increase their presence in the seed rain of recipient communities. The invasive pioneer tree Bellucia pentamera (Melastomataceae) is currently spreading within Gunung Palung National Park in West Kalimantan, Indonesia. The park has also experienced periods of illegal, small-scale, selective logging that seem to...

Data from: MADA: Malagasy Animal trait Data Archive

Onja H. Razafindratsima, Yasmin Yacoby & Daniel S. Park
Species are characterized by their behavioral, physiological and ecological attributes, which determine their role in ecosystems. In turn, ecosystems and their functions are defined by the species that inhabit them. Thus, evaluating the functional diversity and distributions of species is of utmost importance to studies of biogeography, community ecology, macroevolution, and conservation. The functional diversity of species are determined by traits such as diet, foraging strata, trophic level, activity cycle, litter size, generation length, habitat...

Data from: Global macroevolution and macroecology of passerine song

William David Pearse, Ignacio Morales-Castilla, Logan S. James, Maxwell Farrell, Frédéric Boivin & T. Jonathan Davies
Studying the macroevolution of the songs of Passeriformes (perching birds) has proved challenging. The complexity of the task stems not just from the macroevolutionary and macroecological challenge of modelling so many species, but also from the difficulty in collecting and quantifying birdsong itself. Using machine learning techniques, we extracted songs from a large citizen science dataset, and then analysed the evolution, and biotic and abiotic predictors of variation in birdsong across 578 passerine species. Contrary...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    57

Resource Types

  • Dataset
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  • Text
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Affiliations

  • Harvard University
    57
  • University of British Columbia
    5
  • McGill University
    4
  • University of Gothenburg
    4
  • University of Cambridge
    3
  • Indiana University Bloomington
    3
  • Yale University
    3
  • University of Washington
    2
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    2
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    2