12 Works

Data from: Genomic analysis reveals hidden biodiversity within colugos, the sister group to primates

Victor C. Mason, Gang Li, Patrick Minx, Jurgen Schmitz, Gennady Churakov, Liliya Doronina, Amanda D. Melin, Nathaniel J. Dominy, Norman T-L. Lim, Mark S. Springer, Richard K. Wilson, Wesley C. Warren, Kristofer M. Helgen & William J. Murphy
Colugos are one of the most poorly studied mammals despite their centrality to resolving supraordinal primate relationships. Two described species of these gliding mammals are the sole living members of the order Dermoptera, distributed throughout Southeast Asia. We generated a draft genome sequence for a Sunda colugo and a Philippine colugo reference alignment, and used these to identify colugo-specific genetic changes that were enriched in sensory and musculo-skeletal related genes that likely underlie their nocturnal...

Data from: Allometric scaling of intraspecific space use

Carolyn M. Rosten, Rodolphe E. Gozlan & Martyn C. Lucas
Allometric scaling relationships enable exploration of animal space-use patterns, yet interspecific studies cannot address many of the underlying mechanisms. We present the first intraspecific study of home range (HR) allometry relative to energetic requirements over several orders of magnitude of body mass, using as a model the predatory fish, pike Esox lucius. Analogous with interspecific studies, we show that space use increases more rapidly with mass (exponent = 1.08) than metabolic scaling theories predict. Our...

Data from: A combined field survey and molecular identification protocol for comparing forest arthropod biodiversity across spatial scales

Brent C. Emerson, Juliane Casquet, Heriberto López, Pedro Cardoso, Paulo A. V. Borges, Noémy Mollaret, Pedro Oromí, Dominique Strasberg & Christophe Thébaud
Obtaining fundamental biodiversity metrics such as alpha, beta and gamma diversity for arthropods is often complicated by a lack of prior taxonomic information and/or taxonomic expertise, which can result in unreliable morphologically based estimates. We provide a set of standardized ecological and molecular sampling protocols that can be employed by researchers whose taxonomic skills may be limited, and where there may be a lack of robust a priori information regarding the regional pool of species....

Data from: Commensal associations and benthic habitats shape macroevolution of the bivalve clade Galeommatoidea

Jingchun Li, Diarmaid Ó Foighil & Ellen E. Strong
The great diversity of marine life has been shaped by the interplay between abiotic and biotic factors. Among different biotic interactions, symbiosis is an important yet less studied phenomenon. Here, we tested how symbiotic associations affected marine diversification, using the bivalve superfamily Galeommatoidea as a study system. This superfamily contains large numbers of obligate commensal as well as free-living species and is therefore amenable to comparative approaches. We constructed a global molecular phylogeny of Galeommatoidea...

Data from: Phylogenomic analyses support traditional relationships within Cnidaria

Felipe Zapata, Freya E. Goetz, Stephen A. Smith, Mark Howison, Stefan Siebert, Samuel H. Church, Steven M. Sanders, Cheryl Lewis Ames, Catherine S. McFadden, Scott C. France, Marymegan Daly, Allen G. Collins, Steven H. D. Haddock, Casey W. Dunn & Paulyn Cartwright
Cnidaria, the sister group to Bilateria, is the most diverse group of animals in terms of morphology, lifecycles, ecology, and development. How this diversity originated and evolved is not well understood because phylogenetic relationships among major cnidarian lineages are unclear, and recent studies present contrasting phylogenetic hypotheses. Here, we use transcriptome data from 15 newly-sequenced species in combination with 26 publicly available genomes and transcriptomes to assess phylogenetic relationships among major cnidarian lineages. Phylogenetic analyses...

Data from: How the truffle got its mate: insights from genetic structure in spontaneous and planted Mediterranean populations of Tuber melanosporum

Elisa Taschen, François Rousset, Mathieu Sauve, Laure Benoit, Marie-Pierre Dubois, Franck Richard, Marc-André Selosse, M.-P. Dubois & M.-A. Selosse
The life cycles and dispersal of edible fungi are still poorly known, thus limiting our understanding of their evolution and domestication. The prized Tuber melanosporum produces fruitbodies (fleshy organs where meiospores mature) gathered in natural, spontaneously inoculated forests or harvested in plantations of nursery-inoculated trees. Yet, how fruitbodies are formed remains unclear, thus limiting yields, and how current domestication attempts affect population genetic structure is overlooked. Fruitbodies result from mating between two haploid individuals: the...

Data from: Rapid mobilization of abdominal fat in migrating eared grebes

Lorian Cobra Straker, & Joseph R. Jehl
Eared grebes Podiceps nigricollis, like shorebirds and other long-distance migrants, lay down large amounts of fat to power their journeys. To investigate the pattern of how fat and soft tissue might be mobilized, we used grebes killed in migration and applied computed tomography to reconstruct how stores in the chest, thorax, and abdomen were reduced as body weight decreased. Fat and soft tissue were each mobilized at a constant rate through the entire migration. Fat...

Data from: Testing for independence between evolutionary processes

Abdelkader Behdenna, Joël Pothier, Sophie S. Abby, Amaury Lambert & Guillaume Achaz
Evolutionary events co-occurring along phylogenetic trees usually point to complex adaptive phenomena, sometimes implicating epistasis. While a number of methods have been developed to account for co-occurrence of events on the same internal or external branch of an evolutionary tree, there is a need to account for the larger diversity of possible relative positions of events in a tree. Here we propose a method to quantify to what extent two or more evolutionary events are...

Data from: Does hunting or hiking affect wildlife communities in protected areas?

Roland Kays, Arielle W. Parsons, Megan C. Baker, Ellizabeth L. Kalies, Tavis Forrester, Robert Costello, Christopher T. Rota, Joshua J. Millspaugh & William J. McShea
Managed public wild areas have dual mandates to protect biodiversity and provide recreational opportunities for people. These goals could be at odds if recreation, ranging from hiking to legal hunting, disrupts wildlife enough to alter their space use or community structure. We evaluated the effect of managed hunting and recreation on 12 terrestrial wildlife species by employing a large citizen science camera trapping survey at 1947 sites stratified across different levels of human activities in...

Data from: Patterns of tree mortality in a temperate deciduous forest derived from a large forest dynamics plot

Erika B. Gonzalez-Akre, Victoria Meakem, Cheng-Yin Eng, Alan J. Tepley, Norman A. Bourg, William McShea, Stuart J. Davies, Kristina Anderson-Teixeira & Erika Gonzalez-Akre
Tree mortality is one of the most influential drivers of forest dynamics, and characterizing patterns of tree mortality is critical to understanding forest dynamics and ecosystem function in the present era of global change. Here, we use a unique data set of mortality in a temperate deciduous forest to characterize rates and drivers of mortality. At the 25.6-ha Center for Tropical Forest Science—Forest Global Earth Observatory forest dynamics plot at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute...

Data from: Regression commonality analyses on hierarchical genetic distances.

Jérôme G. Prunier, Marc Colyn, Xavier Legendre & Marie-Christine Flamand
Landscape genetics is emerging as an important way of supporting decision-making in landscape management, in response to the deterioration of matrix permeability due to habitat loss and fragmentation. In line with unremitting methodological developments in landscape genetics, a new analytical procedure was recently proposed as a way of evaluating the effects of landscape gradients on genetic structures. This procedure is based on the computation of inter-individual hierarchical genetic distances (HGD), a metric of genetic differentiation...

Data from: Functional homogenization of flower visitor communities with urbanization

Nicolas Deguines, Romain Julliard, Mathieu De Flores & Colin Fontaine
Land-use intensification and resulting habitat loss are put forward as the main causes of flower visitor decline. However, the impact of urbanization, the prime driver of land-use intensification in Europe, is poorly studied. In particular, our understanding of whether and how it affects the composition and functioning of flower visitor assemblages is scant, yet required to cope with increasing urbanization worldwide. Here, we use a nation-wide dataset of plant-flower visitor (Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera) interactions...

Registration Year

  • 2016
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • National Museum of Natural History
    12
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    5
  • National Museum
    2
  • University of California System
    2
  • Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • University of La Réunion
    1
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    1
  • University of Münster
    1
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    1