20 Works

Comparison of size-structured and species-level trophic networks reveals antagonistic effects of temperature on vertical trophic diversity at the population and species level

Willem Bonnaffé, Alain Danet, Stephane Legendre & Eric Edeline
It is predicted that warmer conditions should lead to a loss of trophic levels, as larger bodied consumers, which occupy higher trophic levels, experience higher metabolic costs at high temperature. Yet, it is unclear whether this prediction is consistent with the effect of warming on the trophic structure of natural systems. Furthermore, effects of temperature at the species level, which arise through a change in species composition, may differ from those at the population level,...

Describing biodiversity in the genomics era: Description of a new species of Nearctic Cynipidae gall wasp and its genome

Pedro Ferreira Pinto Brandão-Dias, Y. Miles Zhang, Stacy Pirro, Camila C Vinson, Kelly L Weinersmith, Anna KG Ward, Andrew Forbes & Scott P Egan
Gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) specializing on live oaks in the genus Quercus (subsection Virentes) are a relatively diverse and well-studied community with 14 species described to date, albeit with incomplete information on their biology, life history, and genetic structure. Incorporating an integrative taxonomic approach, we combine morphology, phenology, behavior, genetics, and genomics to describe a new species, Neuroterus valhalla sp. nov. The alternating generations of this species induce galls on the catkins and stem nodes...

Pontocaspian habitat polygon shapefiles from: Decline of unique Pontocaspian biodiversity in the Black Sea Basin: a review

Aleksandre Gogaladze, Mikhail Son, Matteo Lattuada, Vitaliy Anistratenko, Vitaly Syomin, Ana Bianca Pavel, Oana Popa, Luis Popa, Jan-Johan Ter Poorten, Jacobus Biesmeijer, Niels Raes, Thomas Wilke, Arthur Francis Sands, Teodora Trichkova, Zdravko Hubenov, Maxim Vinarski, Olga Anistratenko, Tatiana Alexenko & Frank Wesselingh
The unique aquatic Pontocaspian (PC) biota of the Black Sea Basin (BSB) is in decline. The lack of detailed knowledge on the status and trends of species, populations and communities hampers a thorough risk assessment and precludes effective conservation. This paper reviews PC biodiversity trends in the BSB ( Bulgaria, Romania, Moldova, Ukraine and Russia) using endemic molluscs as a model group. We aim to assess changes in PC habitats, community structure and species distribution...

Interrogating discordance resolves relationships in the rapid radiation of Old World fruit bats (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae)

Nicolas Nesi, Stephen Rossiter, Michael McGowen, Georgia Tsagkogeorga, Burton Lim, Susan Tsang, Violaine Nicolas, Aude Lalis, Silke Riesle Sbarbaro, Sigit Wiantoro, Alan Hitch, Javier Juste, Corinna Pinzari, Frank Bonaccorso, Nancy Simmons, Annette Scanlon & Christopher Todd
The family Pteropodidae (Old World fruit bats) comprises >200 species distributed across the Old World tropics and subtropics. Most pteropodids feed on fruit, suggesting an early origin of frugivory, although several lineages have shifted to nectar-based diets. Pteropodids are of exceptional conservation concern with >50% of species considered threatened, yet the systematics of this group has long been debated, with uncertainty surrounding early splits attributed to an ancient rapid diversification. Resolving the relationships among the...

Seasonality affects specialisation of a temperate forest herbivore community

Carlo Lutz Seifert, Vojtěch Novotny, Carlo L. Seifert, Leonardo R. Jorge, Martin Volf, David L. Wagner, Greg P. A. Lamarre, Scott E. Miller, Erika Gonzalez‐Akre, Kristina J. Anderson‐Teixeira & Vojtěch Novotný
Understanding spatiotemporal trends on insect-plant interaction networks is essential to unveil the ecological and evolutionary processes driving herbivore specialisation. However, community studies accounting for temporal dynamics in host-plant specialisation of herbivorous insects are surprisingly scarce. Here, we provide the background data which were used to investigate how seasonality affects specialisation of a temperate forest herbivore community. This dataset results from a comprehensive sampling of more than 4,700 folivorous caterpillars associated with 16 deciduous tree species...

Moorea Biocode

Neil Davies
The core goal of the Moorea Biocode Project (MBP) is to genetically barcode every non-microbial species on Moorea. We will thus create a professionally produced, verifiable (vouchered) All Taxa Biotic Inventory (ATBI) of Moorea (Output 1), together with the informatics services needed for ATBI and biocode-enabled research in Model Ecosystems (Outcome 2). We will also design a long-term plan (business model) to ensure the financial self-sustainability of biocode services, and carry out proof of concept...

Data from: Landscape composition and life-history traits influence bat movement and space use: analysis of 30 years of published telemetry data

Alexis Laforge, Frederic Archaux, Aurélie Coulon, Clélia Sirami, Jérémy Froidevaux, Nicolas Gouix, Sylvie Ladet, Hilaire Martin, Kévin Barré, Fabien Claireau, Christian Kerbiriou, Charlotte Roemer & Luc Barbaro
Aim: Animal movement determines home range patterns, which in turn affect individual fitness, population dynamics and ecosystem functioning. Using temperate bats, a group of particular conservation concern, we investigated how morphological traits, habitat specialization and environmental variables affect home range sizes and daily foraging movements, using a compilation of 30 years of published bat telemetry data. Location: Northern America and Europe. Time period: 1988 – 2016. Major taxa studied: Bats. Methods: We compiled data on...

Punctuational ecological changes rather than global factors drive species diversification and the evolution of wing phenotypes in Morpho butterflies

Nicolas Chazot, Patrick Blandin, Vincent Debat, Marianne Elias & Fabien Condamine
Assessing the relative importance of geographical and ecological drivers of evolution is paramount to understand the diversification of species and traits at the macroevolutionary scale. Here, we use an integrative approach, combining phylogenetics, biogeography, ecology, and quantified phenotypes to investigate the drivers of both species and phenotypic diversification of the iconic Neotropical butterfly genus Morpho. We generated a time-calibrated phylogeny for all known species and inferred historical biogeography. We fitted models of time-dependent (accounting for...

Substitution rate variation in a robust procellariiform seabird phylogeny is not solely explained by body mass, flight efficiency, population size or life history traits

Andrea Estandia, Terry Chesser, Helen James, Max Levy, Joan Ferrer-Obiol, Vincent Bretagnolle, Jacob González-Solís & Andreanna Welch
Molecular substitution rates vary among branches, which can lead to inaccurate reconstructions of evolutionary relationships and obscure the true phylogeny of affected clades. Body mass is often assumed to be a major driver of substitution rate, though other factors such as population size, life history traits, and flight demands are also thought to have an influence. Birds of the order Procellariiformes—which encompasses petrels, storm-petrels and albatrosses—show a striking 900-fold difference in body mass between the...

Community phylogeographic patterns reveal how a barrier filters and structures taxa in North American warm deserts

Kaiya Provost, Edward A. Myers & Brian Smith
Aim: The study of biogeographic barriers has been instrumental in understanding the evolution and distribution of taxa. With the increasing availability of empirical datasets, emergent patterns can be inferred from communities by synthesizing how barriers filter and structure populations across species. We assemble phylogeographic data across a barrier and perform spatially-explicit simulations to quantify spatiotemporal patterns of divergence, the influence of species traits on these patterns, and the statistical power needed to differentiate alternative diversification...

Supplementary 1: Underwater photogrammetry for close-range 3D imaging of dry-sensitive objects: The case study of cephalopod beaks

Marjorie Roscian, Anthony Herrel, Raphaël Cornette, Arnaud Delapré, Yves Cherel & Isabelle Rouget
Technical advances in 3D imaging have contributed to quantifying and understanding biological variability and complexity. However, small, dry-sensitive objects are not easy to reconstruct using common and easily available techniques such as photogrammetry, surface scanning, or micro-CT scanning. Here we use cephalopod beaks as an example as their size, thickness, transparency, and dry-sensitive nature make them particularly challenging. We developed a new, underwater, photogrammetry protocol in order to add these types of biological structures to...

Raw data for: Biomechanical demands of percussive techniques in the context of early stone toolmaking

Robin Macchi, Guillaume Daver, Michel Brenet, Sandrine Prat, Laurent Hugueville, Sonia Harmand, Jason Lewis & Mathieu Domalain
Recent discoveries in archaeology and palaeoanthropology highlight that stone stool knapping could have emerged first within the genera Australopithecus or Kenyanthropus rather than Homo. To explore the implications of this hypothesis determining the physical demands and motor control needed for performing the percussive movements during the oldest stone toolmaking technology (i.e. Lomekwian) would help. We analysed the joint-angle patterns and muscle activity of a knapping expert using three stone tool replication techniques: unipolar flaking on...

Data from: The Polycytellidae viewed as Gondwanian Glosselytrodea

Olivier Béthoux & John Anderson
The material of Glosselytrodea from the Molteno Formation (Triassic, South Africa), consisting of two specimens, is herein studied. A preliminary comparative analysis is conducted based on the new material and new data on Polycytella triassica Tillyard, 1922 (Triassic, Australia), highlighting the relevance of the width of the area anterior to RA (particularly, opposite the end of ScP), an area very broad in Polycytella Tillyard, 1922, Argentinoglosselytrina Martins-Neto and Gallego, 2001 (Triassic, Argentina) and in the...

Inter- and intra-archipelago dynamics of population structure and gene flow in a Polynesian bird

Ethan Gyllenhaal, Xena Mapel, Tejashree Modak, Lucas DeCicco, Alivereti Naikatini, Ruth Utzurrum, Joshua Seamon, Jean-Claude Thibault, Alice Cibois, Michael Sorenson, Robert Moyle, Lisa Barrow & Michael Andersen
Islands are separated by natural barriers that prevent gene flow between terrestrial populations and promote allopatric diversification. Birds in the South Pacific are an excellent model to explore the interplay between isolation and gene flow due to the region’s numerous archipelagos and well-characterized avian communities. The wattled honeyeater complex (Foulehaio spp.) comprises three allopatric species that are widespread and common across Fiji, Tonga, Samoa, and Wallis and Futuna. Here, we explored patterns of diversification within...

Supplementary material to: Segmental series and size: clade-wide investigation of molar proportions reveals a major evolutionary allometry in the dentition of placental mammals

Guillaume Billet & Jérémie Bardin
Iterative segments such as teeth or limbs are a widespread characteristic of living organisms. While their proportions may be governed by similar developmental rules in vertebrates, there is no emerging pattern as regards their relation to size. Placental mammals span eight orders of magnitude in body size and show a wide spectrum of dietary habits associated with size and reflected in their dentitions, especially molars. Although variation in size constitutes an important determinant for variation...

Evolutionary drivers of sexual signal variation in Amazon slender anoles

Ivan Prates, Annelise D'Angiolella, Miguel Rodrigues, Paulo Melo-Sampaio, Kevin De Queiroz & Rayna Bell
Phenotypic variation among populations, as seen in the signaling traits of many species, provides an opportunity to test whether similar factors generate repeated phenotypic patterns in different parts of a species’ range. We investigated whether genetic divergence, abiotic gradients, and sympatry with closely related species explain variation in the dewlap colors of Amazon Slender Anoles, Anolis fuscoauratus. To this aim, we characterized dewlap diversity in the field with respect to population genetic structure and evolutionary...

Data on paternal age and sperm production of the progeny

Gabriele Sorci, Pauline Vuarin, Loïc Lesobre, Gwènaëlle Levêque, Michel Saint Jalme, Frédéric Lacroix & Yves Hingrat
Parental age has profound consequences for offspring’s phenotype. However, whether patrilineal age affects offspring sperm production is unknown, despite the importance of sperm production for male reproductive success in species facing post-copulatory sexual selection. Using a longitudinal dataset on ejaculate attributes of the houbara bustard, we showed that offspring sired by old fathers had different age-dependent trajectories of sperm production compared to offspring sired by young fathers. Specifically, they produced less sperm (-48%) in their...

Repositories for taxonomic data: Where we are and what is missing

Aurélien Miralles, Teddy Bruy, Katherine Wolcott, Mark Scherz, Dominik Begerow, Bank Beszteri, Michael Bonkowski, Janine Felden, Birgit Gemeinholzer, Frank Glaw, Frank Oliver Glöckner, Oliver Hawlitschek, Ivaylo Kostadinov, Tim Nattkemper, Christian Printzen, Jasmin Renz, Nataliya Rybalka, Marc Stadler, Tanja Weibulat, Thomas Wilke, Susanne Renner & Miguel Vences
Natural history collections are leading successful large-scale projects of specimen digitization (images, metadata, DNA barcodes), transforming taxonomy into a big data science. Yet, little effort has been directed towards safeguarding and subsequently mobilizing the considerable amount of original data generated during the process of naming 15–20,000 species every year. From the perspective of alpha-taxonomists, we provide a review of the properties and diversity of taxonomic data, assess their volume and use, and establish criteria for...

Data for Concordance-based approaches in phylogenomics

Joseph Walker, Stephen Smith, Edwige Moyroud & Richard Hodel
Gene tree conflict is common and finding methods to analyze and alleviate the negative effects that conflict has on species tree analysis is a crucial part of phylogenomics. This study aims to expand the discussion of inferring species trees and molecular branch lengths when conflict is present. Conflict is typically examined in two ways: inferring its prevalence, and inferring the influence of the individual genes (how strongly one gene supports any given topology compared to...

Data from: Reinvestigation of the type specimen of Ginkgophyllum grasseti Saporta 1875 using Reflectance Transforming Imaging

Anne-Laure Decombeix, Ignacio H. Escapa, Dario De Franceschi & Olivier Béthoux
Reflectance Transforming Imaging (RTI) produces photographs in which the angle of the light can be changed at will, allowing to investigate remotely minute details of the 3D structure of sub-planar objects. Here we apply this technique to the type specimen of Gingkophyllum grasseti, a vegetative shoot with putative ginkgophyte affinities from the early Permian of Lodève (France). Gingkophyllum grasseti, the type species of the corresponding genus, was originally described by Saporta in 1875 and has...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    20

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    19
  • Output Management Plan
    1

Affiliations

  • National Museum of Natural History
    20
  • Sorbonne University
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • University of Giessen
    2
  • American Museum of Natural History
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment
    1
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    1
  • University of the South Pacific
    1
  • Rice University
    1