73 Works

Combined effects of climate change and the herbicide diuron on the coral Acropora millepora (NESP 2.1.6 and NESP TWQ 5.2, AIMS)

Flores Florita, Sven Uthicke, Frances Patel, Andrew Negri, Joseanne Marques & Kaserzon Sarit

Additional material associated with the Matters Arising article published in Nature by Munday and colleagues

Philip Munday, Danielle Dixson, Megan Welch, Douglas Chivers, Paolo Domenici, Martin Grosell, Rachel Heuer, Geoffrey Jones, Mark McCormick, Mark Meekan, Göran Nilsson, Timothy Ravasi & Sue-Ann Watson

Aerial surveys of coral bleaching. Standard Operational Procedure Number 11 v2

R Berkelmans, N Cantin & R Pears

Species-level coral bleaching data for Maldives and GBR

Paul Muir, Terence Done & David Aguirre
Response to coral bleaching for 7368 coral colonies exposed to similar levels of temperature stress at a similar depth of occurrence and similar subsequent mortality. Collected in situ following moderate thermal bleaching events in the GBR in 2002 and the Maldives in 2016. Data gives species, site, depth of occurence and bleaching response which was scored by tissue colour.

Data from: Optimising sample sizes for animal distribution analysis using tracking data

Takahiro Shimada, Michele Thums, Mark Hamann, Colin Limpus, Graeme Hays, Nancy FitzSimmons, Natalie Wildermann, Carlos Duarte & Mark Meekan
1. Knowledge of the spatial distribution of populations is fundamental to management plans for any species. When tracking data are used to describe distributions, it is sometimes assumed that the reported locations of individuals delineate the spatial extent of areas used by the target population. 2. Here, we examine existing approaches to validate this assumption, highlight caveats, and propose a new method for a more informative assessment of the number of tracked animals (i.e. sample...

Environmental DNA reveals a multi-taxa biogeographic break across the Arabian Sea and Sea of Oman

Joseph DiBattista, Michael Berumen, Mark Priest, Maarten De Brauwer, Darren Coker, Tane Sinclair-Taylor, Amanda Hay, Gerd Bruss, Shawky Mansour, Michael Bunce, Christopher Goatley, Matthew Power & Alyssa Marshell
Environmental DNA (eDNA) is increasingly being used to assess community composition in marine ecosystems. Applying eDNA approaches across broad spatial scales now provide the potential to inform biogeographic analyses. However, to date, few studies have employed this technique to assess broad biogeographic patterns across multiple taxonomic groups. Here, we compare eDNA-derived communities of bony fishes and invertebrates, including corals and sponges, from 15 locations spanning the entire length of the Omani coast. This survey includes...

Data from: A global perspective on the trophic geography of sharks

Christopher Stephen Bird, Ana Veríssimo, Sarah Magozzi, Kátya G. Abrantes, Alex Aguilar, Hassan Al-Reasi, Adam Barnett, Dana M. Bethea, Gérard Biais, Asuncion Borrell, Marc Bouchoucha, Mariah Boyle, Edward J. Brooks, Juerg Brunnschweiler, Paco Bustamante, Aaron Carlisle, Diana Catarino, Stéphane Caut, Yves Cherel, Tiphaine Chouvelon, Diana Churchill, Javier Ciancio, Julien Claes, Ana Colaço, Dean L. Courtney … & Clive N. Trueman
Sharks are a diverse group of mobile predators that forage across varied spatial scales and have the potential to influence food web dynamics. The ecological consequences of recent declines in shark biomass may extend across broader geographic ranges if shark taxa display common behavioural traits. By tracking the original site of photosynthetic fixation of carbon atoms that were ultimately assimilated into muscle tissues of 5,394 sharks from 114 species, we identify globally consistent biogeographic traits...

Data from: The coral immune response facilitates protection against microbes during tissue regeneration

Jeroen A. J. M. Van De Water, Tracy D. Ainsworth, William Leggat, David G. Bourne, Mikhail V. Matz, Bette L. Willis & Madeleine J. H. Van Oppen
Increasing physical damage on coral reefs from predation, storms and anthropogenic disturbances highlights the need to understand the impact of injury on the coral immune system. In this study, we examined the regulation of the coral immune response over 10 days following physical trauma artificially inflicted on in situ colonies of the coral Acropora aspera, simultaneously with bacterial colonization of the lesions. Corals responded to injury by increasing the expression of immune system-related genes involved...

Data from: Genetic signatures through space, time and multiple disturbances in a ubiquitous brooding coral

Jim N. Underwood, Zoe T. Richards, Karen J. Miller, Marji L. Puotinen & James P. Gilmour
The predominance of self-recruitment in many reef-building corals has fundamental and complex consequences for their genetic diversity, population persistence and responses to climate change. Knowledge of genetic structure over local scales needs to be placed within a broad spatial context, and also integrated with genetic monitoring through time to disentangle these consequences. Here, we examined patterns of genetic diversity over multiple spatio-temporal scales across tropical Australia in the ubiquitous brooding coral, Seriatopora hystrix. We also...

Data from: Temporal and spatial activity-associated energy partitioning in free-swimming sea snakes

Vinay Udyawer, Colin A. Simpfendorfer, Michelle R. Heupel & Timothy D. Clark
1. Partitioning energy between critical basal functions and activity-associated behaviours is a primary determinant of animal survival. Consequently, habitat selection is likely to be driven by the efficiency with which resources can be acquired from a heterogeneous energy landscape. 2. Determining how energy partitioning is achieved across temporal and spatial scales is particularly challenging in aquatic animals due to the logistical limitations in estimating field metabolic rates (FMR) while simultaneously examining habitat choice. 3. Here,...

Data from: Aerobic scope predicts dominance during early life in a tropical damselfish

Shaun S. Killen, Matthew D. Mitchell, Jodie L. Rummer, Douglas P. Chivers, Maud C. O. Ferrari, Mark I. McCormick & Mark G. Meekan
A range of physiological traits are linked with aggression and dominance within social hierarchies, but the role of individual aerobic capacity in facilitating aggression has seldom been studied. Further, links previously observed between an individual's metabolic rate and aggression level may be context dependent and modulated by factors such as social stress and competitor familiarity. We examined these issues in juvenile Ambon damselfish, Pomacentrus amboinensis, which display intraspecific competition for territories during settlement on coral...

Data from: Larval settlement: the role of surface topography for sessile coral reef invertebrates

Steve Whalan, Muhammad A. Abdul Wahab, Susanne Sprungala, Andrew J. Poole & Rocky De Nys
For sessile marine invertebrates with complex life cycles, habitat choice is directed by the larval phase. Defining which habitat-linked cues are implicated in sessile invertebrate larval settlement has largely concentrated on chemical cues which are thought to signal optimal habitat. There has been less effort establishing physical settlement cues, including the role of surface microtopography. This laboratory based study tested whether surface microtopography alone (without chemical cues) plays an important contributing role in the settlement...

Data from: Gene expression plasticity as a mechanism of coral adaptation to a variable environment

Carly D. Kenkel & Mikhail V. Matz
Local adaptation is ubiquitous, but the molecular mechanisms that give rise to this ecological phenomenon remain largely unknown. A year-long reciprocal transplant of mustard hill coral (Porites astreoides) between a highly environmentally variable inshore habitat and a more stable offshore habitat demonstrated that populations exhibit phenotypic signatures that are consistent with local adaptation. We characterized the genomic basis of this adaptation in both coral hosts and their intracellular symbionts (Symbiodinium sp.) using genome-wide gene expression...

Data from: Multiple scales of genetic connectivity in a brooding coral on isolated reefs following catastrophic bleaching

James N. Underwood, Luke D. Smith, Madeleine J.H. Van Oppen & James P. Gilmour
Understanding the pattern of connectivity among populations is crucial for the development of realistic and spatially explicit population models in marine systems. Here we analysed variation at eight microsatellite loci to assess the genetic structure and to infer patterns of larval dispersal for a brooding coral, Seriatopora hystrix, at an isolated system of reefs in northern Western Australia. Spatial autocorrelation analyses show that populations are locally subdivided, and that the majority of larvae recruit to...

Data from: Seagrass ecosystems reduce exposure to bacterial pathogens of humans, fishes and invertebrates

Joleah B. Lamb, Jeroen A. J. M. Van De Water, David G. Bourne, Craig Altier, Margaux Y. Hein, Evan A. Fiorenza, Nur Abu, Jamaluddin Jompa & C. Drew Harvell
Plants are important in urban environments for removing pathogens and improving water quality. Seagrass meadows are the most widespread coastal ecosystem on the planet. Although these plants are known to be associated with natural biocide production, they have not been evaluated for their ability to remove microbiological contamination. Using amplicon sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, we found that when seagrass meadows are present, there was a 50% reduction in the relative abundance of...

Data from: Sperm dispersal distances estimated by parentage analysis in a brooding scleractinian coral

Patricia Warner, Bette Willis, Madeleine Van Oppen, Madeleine J. H. Van Oppen, Patricia A. Warner & Bette L. Willis
Within populations of brooding sessile corals, sperm dispersal constitutes the mechanism by which gametes interact and mating occurs, and forms the first link in the network of processes that determine species-wide connectivity patterns. However, almost nothing is known about sperm dispersal for any internally fertilizing coral. In this study, we conducted a parentage analysis on coral larvae collected from an area of mapped colonies, in order to measure the distance sperm disperses for the first...

Data from: Functional genomic analysis of corals from natural CO2-seeps reveals core molecular responses involved in acclimatization to ocean acidification

Carly D. Kenkel, Aurelie Moya, Julia Strahl, Craig Humphrey & Line K. Bay
Little is known about the potential for acclimatization or adaptation of corals to ocean acidification and even less about the molecular mechanisms underpinning these processes. Here we examine global gene expression patterns in corals and their intracellular algal symbionts from two replicate population pairs in Papua New Guinea that have undergone long-term acclimatization to natural variation in pCO2. In the coral host, only 61 genes were differentially expressed in response to pCO2 environment, but the...

Data from: Genomic determinants of coral heat tolerance across latitudes

Groves B. Dixon, Sarah W. Davies, Galina A. Aglyamova, Eli Meyer, Line K. Bay & Mikhail V. Matz
As global warming continues, reef-building corals could avoid local population declines through “genetic rescue” involving exchange of heat-tolerant genotypes across latitudes, but only if latitudinal variation in thermal tolerance is heritable. Here, we show an up–to–10-fold increase in odds of survival of coral larvae under heat stress when their parents come from a warmer lower-latitude location. Elevated thermal tolerance was associated with heritable differences in expression of oxidative, extracellular, transport, and mitochondrial functions that indicated...

Data from: Genetic diversity and divergence among coastal and offshore reefs in a hard coral depend on geographic discontinuity and oceanic currents.

James N. Underwood
Understanding the evolutionary processes that have shaped existing patterns of genetic diversity of reef-building corals over broad scales is required to inform long-term conservation planning. Genetic structure and diversity of the mass-spawning hard coral, Acropora tenuis, were assessed with seven DNA microsatellite loci from a series of isolated and discontinuous coastal and offshore reef systems in northwest Australia. Significant subdivision was detected among all sites (FST = 0.062, RST = 0.090), with the majority of...

Data from: Historical and contemporary factors shape the population genetic structure of the broadcast spawning coral, Acropora millepora, on the Great Barrier Reef

Madeleine J. H. Van Oppen, Lesa M. Peplow, Stuart Kininmonth & Ray Berkelmans
Effective management of reef corals requires knowledge of the extent to which populations are open or closed and the scales over which genetic exchange occurs, information which is commonly derived from population genetic data. Such data are sparse for Great Barrier Reef (GBR) corals and other organisms, with the studies that are available being mostly based on a small number of sampling locations spanning only part of the GBR. Using 11 microsatellite loci, we genotyped...

Data from: Multiple scales of genetic connectivity in a brooding coral on isolated reefs following catastrophic bleaching

James N. Underwood, Luke D. Smith, Madeleine J.H. Van Oppen & James P. Gilmour
Understanding the pattern of connectivity among populations is crucial for the development of realistic and spatially explicit population models in marine systems. Here we analysed variation at eight microsatellite loci to assess the genetic structure and to infer patterns of larval dispersal for a brooding coral, Seriatopora hystrix, at an isolated system of reefs in northern Western Australia. Spatial autocorrelation analyses show that populations are locally subdivided, and that the majority of larvae recruit to...

Data from: Ecologically relevant dispersal of corals on isolated reefs: implications for managing resilience

James N. Underwood, Luke D. Smith, Madeleine J.H. Van Oppen, James P. Gilmour, Madeleine J. H. Van Oppen & Jim N. Underwood
Coral reefs are in decline worldwide, and marine reserve networks have been advocated as a powerful management tool for maximizing the resilience of coral communities to an increasing variety, number, and severity of disturbances. However, the effective design of reserves must account for the spatial scales of larval dispersal that affect the demography of communities over ecological time frames. Ecologically relevant distances of dispersal were inferred from DNA microsatellite data in a broadcast-spawning (Acropora tenuis)...

Data from: Searching for common threads in threadfins: phylogeography of Australian Polynemids in space and time

John B. Horne, Paolo Momigliano, David J. Welch, Stephen J. Newman, Lynne Van Herwerden, JB Horne, L Van Herwerden, P Momigliano & SJ Newman
Proper management of marine fisheries requires an understanding of the spatial and temporal dynamics of marine populations, which can be obtained from genetic data. While numerous fisheries species have been surveyed for spatial genetic patterns, temporally sampled genetic data is not available for many species. Here we present a phylogeographic survey of the king threadfin, Polydactylus macrochir, across its species range in northern Australia and at a temporal scale of one and ten years. Spatially...

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