7 Works

Data from: Integrated evidence reveals a new species in the ancient blue coral genus Heliopora (Octocorallia)

Zoe T. Richards, Nina Yasuda, Taisei Kikuchi, Taryn Foster, Chika Mitsuyuki, Michael Stat, Yoshihisa Suyama & Nerida G. Wilson
Maintaining the accretion potential and three dimensional structure of coral reefs is a priority but reef-building scleractinian corals are highly threatened and retreating. Hence future reefs are predicted to be dominated by non-constructional taxa. Since the Late Triassic however, other non-scleractinian anthozoans such as Heliopora have contributed to tropical and subtropical reef-building. Heliopora is an ancient and highly conserved reef building octocoral genus within the monospecific Family Helioporidae, represented by a single extant species –...

Data from: Latitudinal and seasonal variation in space use by a large, predatory reef fish, Plectropomus leopardus

Molly E. Scott, Michelle R. Heupel, Colin A. Simpfendorfer, Jordan K. Matley & Morgan S. Pratchett
1. Temperature directly affects the metabolic rate and resource requirements of ectothermic animals, which is likely to influence their movement and habitat use. Space use is a fundamental component of an animal’s ecology and the extent of an animal’s home range has consequences for individual distributions, community structure and ecosystem function. As ocean temperatures continue to rise as a result of global warming, determining the effects of temperature on space use and movement patterns of...

Data from: Adaptation to reef habitats through selection on the coral animal and its associated microbiome

Madeleine J.H. Van Oppen, Pim Bongaerts, Pedro Frade, Lesa M. Peplow, Sarah E. Boyd, Hieu T. Nim, Line K. Bay & Madeleine J. H. Van Oppen
Spatially adjacent habitats on coral reefs can represent highly distinct environments, often harbouring different coral communities. Yet, certain coral species thrive across divergent environments. It is unknown whether the forces of selection are sufficiently strong to overcome the counteracting effects of the typically high gene flow over short distances, and for local adaptation to occur. We screened the coral genome (using restriction-site-associated sequencing [RAD-seq]), and characterized both the dinoflagellate photosymbiont and tissue-associated prokaryote microbiomes (using...

Data from: Using virtual reality to estimate aesthetic values of coral reefs

Julie Vercelloni, Sam Clifford, M. Julian Caley, Alan R. Pearse, Ross Brown, Allan James, Bryce Christensen, Tomasz Bednarz, Ken Anthony, Manuel González-Rivero, Kerrie Mengersen & Erin E. Peterson
Aesthetic value, or beauty, is important to the relationship between humans and natural environments and is, therefore, a fundamental socioeconomic attribute of conservation alongside other ecosystem services. However, beauty is difficult to quantify and is not estimated well using traditional approaches to monitoring coral reef aesthetics. To improve the estimation of ecosystem aesthetic values, we developed and implemented a novel framework used to quantify features of coral reef aesthetics based on people’s perceptions of beauty....

Data from: Potential of a no-take marine reserve to protect home ranges of anadromous brown trout (Salmo trutta)

Susanna H. Thorbjørnsen, Even Moland, Colin Simpfendorfer, Michelle Heupel, Halvor Knutsen & Esben M. Olsen
1. The extent to which no‐take marine reserves can benefit anadromous species requires examination. 2. Here, we used acoustic telemetry to investigate the spatial behavior of anadromous brown trout (sea trout, Salmo trutta) in relation to a small marine reserve(~1.5 km2) located inside a fjord on the Norwegian Skagerrak coast. 3. On average, sea trout spent 42.3 % (±5.0% SE) of their time in the fjord within the reserve, a proportion similar to the area...

Data from: Integrating complementary methods to improve diet analysis in fishery-targeted species

Jordan K. Matley, Gregory E. Maes, Floriaan Devloo-Delva, Roger Huerlimann, Gladys Chua, Andrew J. Tobin, Aaron T. Fisk, Colin A. Simpfendorfer & Michelle R. Heupel
Developing efficient, reliable, cost-effective ways to identify diet is required to understand trophic ecology in complex ecosystems and improve food web models. A combination of techniques, each varying in their ability to provide robust, spatially and temporally explicit information can be applied to clarify diet data for ecological research. This study applied an integrative analysis of a fishery-targeted species group - Plectropomus spp.in the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia by comparing three diet-identification approaches. Visual...

Data from: Genetic signatures through space, time and multiple disturbances in a ubiquitous brooding coral

Jim N. Underwood, Zoe T. Richards, Karen J. Miller, Marji L. Puotinen & James P. Gilmour
The predominance of self-recruitment in many reef-building corals has fundamental and complex consequences for their genetic diversity, population persistence and responses to climate change. Knowledge of genetic structure over local scales needs to be placed within a broad spatial context, and also integrated with genetic monitoring through time to disentangle these consequences. Here, we examined patterns of genetic diversity over multiple spatio-temporal scales across tropical Australia in the ubiquitous brooding coral, Seriatopora hystrix. We also...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    7

Affiliations

  • Australian Institute of Marine Science
    7
  • James Cook University
    3
  • University of Queensland
    2
  • University of Windsor
    2
  • Curtin University
    2
  • University of Algarve
    1
  • Western Australian Museum
    1
  • Tohoku University
    1
  • University of Melbourne
    1
  • Center for Human Genetics
    1