3 Works

Subcellular view of host–microbiome nutrient exchange in sponges: insights into the ecological success of an early metazoan–microbe symbiosis

Meggie Hudspith, Laura Rix, Michelle Achlatis, Jeremy Bougoure, Paul Guagliardo, Peta L. Clode, Nicole S. Webster, Gerard Muyzer, Mathieu Pernice & Jasper M. De Goeij
Background: Sponges are increasingly recognised as key ecosystem engineers in many aquatic habitats. They play an important role in nutrient cycling due to their unrivalled capacity for processing both dissolved and particulate organic matter (DOM and POM) and the exceptional metabolic repertoire of their diverse and abundant microbial communities. Functional studies determining the role of host and microbiome in organic nutrient uptake and exchange, however, are limited. Therefore, we coupled pulse-chase isotopic tracer techniques with...

Large-scale interventions may delay decline of the Great Barrier Reef

Scott Condie, Ken Anthony, Mark Baird, Roger Beeden, Daniel Harrison, Éva Plagányi, Russell Babcock, Cameron Fletcher, Rebecca Gorton, Alistair Hobday & David Westcott
On the iconic Great Barrier Reef (GBR) the cumulative impacts of tropical cyclones, marine heatwaves and regular outbreaks of coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish (CoTS) have severely depleted coral cover. Climate change will further exacerbate this situation over the coming decades unless effective interventions are implemented. Evaluating the efficacy of alternative interventions in a complex system experiencing major cumulative impacts can only be achieved through a systems-modeling approach. We have evaluated combinations of interventions using a coral...

Peaceful coexistence between people and deadly wildlife: why are recreational users of the ocean so rarely bitten by sea snakes?

Vinay Udyawer
1) Research on interactions between humans and deadly snakes has focused on situations that result in high rates of snakebite; but we can also learn from cases where snakes and people coexist peacefully. For example, coastal bays near Noumea, in the Pacific archipelago of New Caledonia, are used by thousands of tourists and snakes, but bites are rare. 2) Our long-term studies clarify reasons for this coexistence. Although 97% of snakes encountered in standardized snorkel...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Australian Institute of Marine Science
    3
  • Southern Cross University
    1
  • Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority
    1
  • University of Queensland
    1
  • CSIRO Ocean and Atmosphere
    1
  • University of Technology Sydney
    1
  • University of Western Australia
    1
  • University of Amsterdam
    1