17 Works

Data from: Geographic variation in larval metabolic rate between northern and southern populations of the invasive gypsy moth

Carolyn May, Noah Hillerbrand, Lily M. Thompson, Trevor M. Faske, Eloy Martinez, Dylan Parry, Salvatore J. Agosta & Kristine L. Grayson
Thermal regimes can diverge considerably across the geographic range of a species, and accordingly, populations can vary in their response to changing environmental conditions. Both local adaptation and acclimatization are important mechanisms for ectotherms to maintain homeostasis as environments become thermally stressful, which organisms often experience at their geographic range limits. The spatial spread of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) after introduction to North America provides an exemplary system for studying population variation in...

Data from: Mother's social status is associated with child health in a horticulturalist population

Sarah Alami, Christopher Von Rueden, Edmond Seabright, Thomas S. Kraft, Aaron D. Blackwell, Jonathan Stieglitz, Hillard Kaplan & Michael Gurven
High social status is often associated with greater mating opportunities and fertility for men, but do women also obtain fitness benefits of high status? Greater resource access and child survivorship may be principal pathways through which social status increases women’s fitness. Here we examine whether peer-rankings of women’s social status (indicated by political influence, project leadership and respect) positively covaries with child nutritional status and health in a community of Amazonian horticulturalists. We find that...

Data from: Thermal sensitivity of gypsy moth (Lepidoptera: Erebidae) during larval and pupal development

Nana Banahene, Salem K. Salem, Trevor M. Faske, Hannah M. Byrne, Madison Glackin, Salvatore J. Agosta, Andrew J. Eckert, Kristine L. Grayson & Lily M. Thompson
As global temperatures rise, thermal limits play an increasingly important role in determining the persistence and spread of invasive species. Gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L. Lepidotera: Erebidae) in North America provides an ideal system for studying the effect of high temperatures on invasive species performance. Here, we used fluctuating temperature regimes and exposed gypsy moth at specific points in development (first–fourth instar, pupa) to cycles of favorable(22–28°C) or high-temperature treatments 030–36°C, 32–38°C, 34–40°C) for either...

Climate-related geographic variation in performance traits across the invasion front of a widespread nonnative insect

Lily Thompson, Sean Powers, Ashley Appolon, Petra Hafker, Lelia Milner, Dylan Parry, Salvatore Agosta & Kristine Grayson
Aim: Invasive species are an ideal system for testing geographic differences in performance traits and measuring evolutionary responses as a species spreads across divergent climates and habitats. The European gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar dispar L. (Lepidoptera: Erebidae), is a generalist forest defoliator introduced to Medford, Massachusetts, USA in 1869. Currently, the invasion front extends from Minnesota to North Carolina and the ability of gypsy moth populations to adapt to local climate may contribute to its...

Data from: Variation in growth and developmental responses to supraoptimal temperatures near latitudinal range limits of gypsy moth Lymantria dispar (L.), an expanding invasive species

Lily M. Thompson, Trevor M. Faske, Nana Banahene, Dominique Grim, Salvatore J. Agosta, Dylan Parry, Patrick C. Tobin, Derek M. Johnson & Kristine L. Grayson
Variation in thermal performance within and between populations provides the potential for adaptive responses to increasing temperatures associated with climate change. Organisms experiencing temperatures above their optimum on a thermal performance curve exhibit rapid declines in function and these supraoptimal temperatures can be a critical physiological component of range limits. The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.) (Lepidoptera: Erebidae), is one of the best-documented biological invasions and factors driving its spatial spread are of significant ecological...

Data analysis from: Demographic consequences of changing body size in a terrestrial salamander

Raisa Hernández-Pacheco, Floriane Plard, Kristine L. Grayson & Ulrich K. Steiner
Changes in climate can alter individual body size, and the resulting shifts in reproduction and survival are expected to impact population dynamics and viability. However, appropriate methods to account for size-dependent demographic changes are needed, especially in understudied yet threatened groups such as amphibians. We investigated individual and population-level demographic effects of changes in body size for a terrestrial salamander using capture-mark-recapture data. For our analysis, we implemented an integral projection model parameterized with capture-recapture...

Data from: A new species of Chiasmocleis (Microhylidae, Gastrophryninae) from the Atlantic Forest of Espírito Santo State, Brazil

João Filipe R. Tonini, Maurício C. Forlani & Rafael O De Sá
Among Neotropical microhylids, the genus Chiasmocleis is exceptionally diverse. Most species of Chiasmocleis were described in recent years based on external morphology, but recent studies using molecular data did not support the monophyly of the species groups clustered based on feet webbing. Furthermore, a phylogeographic study of C. lacrimae estimated high genetic divergence and low gene flow among populations across small geographic ranges. Increasing the molecular and geographic sampling, and incorporating morphological data, we identified...

Data from: Unexpected spatial population ecology of a widespread terrestrial salamander near its southern range edge

Raisa Hernández-Pacheco, Chris Sutherland, Lily M. Thompson & Kristine Grayson
Under the current amphibian biodiversity crisis, common species provide an opportunity to measure population dynamics across a wide range of environmental conditions while examining the processes that determine abundance and structure geographic ranges. Studying species at their range limits also provides a window for understanding the dynamics expected in future environments under increasing climate change and human modification. We quantified patterns of seasonal activity, density, and space use in the Eastern red-backed salamander (Plethodon cinereus)...

Is sexual conflict a driver of speciation? a case study with a tribe of brush-footed butterflies

Ana Paula Dos Santos De Carvalho, Ryan St Laurent, Emmanuel Toussaint, Caroline Storer, Kelly Dexter, Kwaku Aduse-Poku & Akito Kawahara
Understanding the evolutionary mechanisms governing the uneven distribution of species richness across the tree of life is a great challenge in biology. Scientists have long argued that sexual conflict is a key driver of speciation. This hypothesis, however, has been highly debated in light of empirical evidence. Recent advances in the study of macroevolution make it possible to test this hypothesis with more data and increased accuracy. In the present study, we use phylogenomics combined...

Quantifying the effects of species traits on predation risk in nature: a comparative study of butterfly wing damage

Freerk Molleman, Juhan Javoiš, Robert Davis, Melissa Whitaker, Toomas Tammaru, Andreas Prinzing, Erki Õunap, Niklas Wahlberg, Ullasa Kodandaramaiah, Kwaku Aduse-Poku, Ants Kaasik & James Carey
1) Evading predators is a fundamental aspect of the ecology and evolution of all prey animals. In studying the influence of prey traits on predation risk, previous researchers have shown that crypsis reduces attack rates on resting prey, predation risk increases with increased prey activity, and rapid locomotion reduces attack rates and increases chances of surviving predator attacks. However, evidence for these conclusions is nearly always based on observations of selected species under artificial conditions....

Data from: Evolutionary genomics of gypsy moth populations sampled along a latitudinal gradient

Christopher J Friedline, Trevor M Faske, Brandon M Lind, Erin M Hobson, Dylan Parry, Rodney J Dyer, Derek M Johnson, Lily M Thompson, Kristine L Grayson & Andrew J Eckert
The European gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) was first introduced to Massachusetts in 1869 and within 150 years has spread throughout eastern North America. This large-scale invasion across a heterogeneous landscape allows examination of the genetic signatures of adaptation potentially associated with rapid geographic spread. We tested the hypothesis that spatially divergent natural selection has driven observed changes in three developmental traits that were measured in a common garden for 165 adult moths sampled from...

Data from: Sibling species of mutualistic Symbiodinium clade G from bioeroding sponges in the western Pacific and western Atlantic oceans

Blake D. Ramsby, Malcolm S. Hill, Daniel J. Thornhill, Sieuwkje F. Steenuizen, Michelle Achlatis, Allison M. Lewis, Todd C. LaJeunesse & Sieuwkje F. Steenhuizen
Dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium associate with a broad array of metazoan and protistian hosts. Symbiodinium-based symbioses involving bioeroding sponge hosts have received less attention than those involving scleractinian hosts. Certain species of common Cliona harbor high densities of an ecologically restricted group of Symbiodinium, referred to as Clade G. The relationships of these unusual Clade G Symbiodinium with Foraminifera, sponges, and black coral (Antipatharia) are rarely studied. Nonetheless, analyses of genetic evidence indicate that...

Data from: Physiological responses to elevated temperature across the geographic range of a terrestrial salamander

Alexander J. Novarro, Caitlin R. Gabor, Cory B. Goff, Tori D. Mezebish, Lily M. Thompson & Kristine L. Grayson
Widespread species often possess physiological mechanisms for coping with thermal heterogeneity, and uncovering these mechanisms provides insight into species responses to climate change. The emergence of non-invasive corticosterone (CORT) assays allows us to rapidly assess physiological responses to environmental change on a large scale. We lack, however, a basic understanding of how temperature affects CORT, and whether temperature and CORT interactively affect performance. Here, we examine the effects of elevated temperature on CORT and whole-organism...

Data from: The genetic basis of a rare flower color polymorphism in Mimulus lewisii provides insight to the evolutionary mutation spectrum

Carrie A. Wu, Matthew A. Streisfeld, Laura I. Nutter & Kaitlyn A. Cross
A long-standing question in evolutionary biology asks whether the genetic changes contributing to phenotypic evolution are predictable. Here, we identify a genetic change associated with segregating variation in flower color within a population of Mimulus lewisii. To determine whether these types of changes are predictable, we combined this information with data from other species to investigate whether the spectrum of mutations affecting flower color transitions differs based on the evolutionary time-scale since divergence. We used...

Evolution of multiple postzygotic barriers between species of the Mimulus tilingii complex

Gabrielle D. Sandstedt, Carrie A. Wu & Andrea L. Sweigart
Species are often defined by their ability to interbreed (i.e., Biological Species Concept), but determining how and why reproductive isolation arises between new species can be challenging. In the Mimulus tilingii species complex, three species (M. caespitosa, M. minor, and M. tilingii) are largely allopatric and grow exclusively at high elevations (>2000m). The extent to which geographic separation has shaped patterns of divergence among the species is not well understood. In this study, we determined...

Demographic analysis for article Hurricane-induced demographic changes in a nonhuman primate population

Raisa Hernández-Pacheco, Dana O Morcillo, Ulrich K Steiner, Angelina V Ruiz-Lambides & Kristine L Grayson
Major disturbance events can have large impacts on the demography and dynamics of animal populations. Hurricanes are one example of an extreme climatic event, predicted to increase in intensity due to climate change, and thus expected to be a considerable threat to population viability. However, little is understood about the underlying demographic mechanisms shaping population response following these extreme disturbances. Here, we analyze 45 years of the most comprehensive free-ranging nonhuman primate demographic dataset to...

Microgeographic divergence of functional responses among salamanders under antagonistic selection from apex predators

Mark C. Urban, Nicole Friedenfelds & Jonathan Richardson
A predator's functional response determines predator–prey interactions by describing the relationship between the number of prey available and the number eaten. Its shape and parameters fundamentally govern the dynamic equilibrium of predator–prey interactions and their joint abundances. Yet, estimates of these key parameters generally assume stasis in space and time and ignore the potential for local adaptation to alter feeding responses and the stability of trophic dynamics. Here, we evaluate if functional responses diverge among...

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