32 Works

Comparing genome-based estimates of relatedness for use in pedigree-based conservation management

Samantha Hauser, Stephanie Galla, Andrea Putnam, Tammy Steeves & Emily Latch
Researchers have long debated which estimator of relatedness best captures the degree of relationship between two individuals. In the genomics era, this debate continues, with relatedness estimates being sensitive to the methods used to generate markers, marker quality, and levels of diversity in sampled individuals. Here, we compare six commonly used genome-based relatedness estimators (kinship genetic distance (KGD), Wang Maximum Likelihood (TrioML), Queller and Goodnight (Rxy), Kinship INference for Genome-wide association studies (KING-robust), and Pairwise...

Data for: Social learning in a nocturnal marsupial: Is it a possum-ability?

Emma Godfrey, Elissa Cameron & Graham Hickling
Social learning can reduce the costs associated with trial-and-error learning. There is speculation that social learning could contribute to trap and bait avoidance in invasive species like the Common Brushtail Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) – a marsupial for which social learning has not previously been investigated. In large outdoor pens, we presented wild-caught ‘demonstrator’ possums with puzzle devices containing an attractive food reward; 2 of 8 demonstrators accessed the reward the first night the puzzle was...

Additional file 1 of Genomic trajectories of a near-extinction event in the Chatham Island black robin

Johanna von Seth, Tom van der Valk, Edana Lord, Hanna Sigeman, Remi-André Olsen, Michael Knapp, Olga Kardailsky, Fiona Robertson, Marie Hale, Dave Houston, Euan Kennedy, Love Dalén, Karin Norén, Melanie Massaro, Bruce C. Robertson & Nicolas Dussex
Additional file 1.

Additional file 1 of Genomic trajectories of a near-extinction event in the Chatham Island black robin

Johanna von Seth, Tom van der Valk, Edana Lord, Hanna Sigeman, Remi-André Olsen, Michael Knapp, Olga Kardailsky, Fiona Robertson, Marie Hale, Dave Houston, Euan Kennedy, Love Dalén, Karin Norén, Melanie Massaro, Bruce C. Robertson & Nicolas Dussex
Additional file 1.

Additional file 2 of Genomic trajectories of a near-extinction event in the Chatham Island black robin

Johanna von Seth, Tom van der Valk, Edana Lord, Hanna Sigeman, Remi-André Olsen, Michael Knapp, Olga Kardailsky, Fiona Robertson, Marie Hale, Dave Houston, Euan Kennedy, Love Dalén, Karin Norén, Melanie Massaro, Bruce C. Robertson & Nicolas Dussex
Additional file 2.

New Zealand Paleoseismic Site Database: design and overview of version 1.0

Nicola J. Litchfield, Jade Humphrey, Regine Morgenstern, Robert M. Langridge, Genevieve L. Coffey & Russ J. Van Dissen
The New Zealand Paleoseismic Site Database (new term, new database) contains paleoseismic data (grouped into Slip Rate, Earthquake [EQ] Timings and Recurrence Interval [RI], and Single-Event Displacement [SED]) collected at specific sites along active faults throughout New Zealand. The database was developed as part of the New Zealand National Seismic Hazard Model 2022 Revision Project (NSHM 2022). The primary purpose is to compile paleoseismic data at specific sites to be used either as inputs into,...

2021 New Zealand Ground-Motion Database

Jesse Hutchinson, Brendon A. Bradley, Robin Lee, Liam Wotherspoon, Mike Dupuis, Claudio Schill, Jason Motha, Anna E. Kaiser & Elena F. Manea
This report summarises the development of the 2021 New Zealand ground-motion database. Ground-motion intensity measures have been computed from strong-motion recordings for events with moment (and moment-equivalent) magnitudes equal to or greater than 4.0 from the year 2000 until the end of 2020. These measures include peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity, cumulative absolute velocity, Arias intensity and pseudo-acceleration response spectra, among others. Along with these intensity measures, we have determined and/or collated earthquake rupture...

New Zealand Community Fault Model - version 1.0

Hannu Seebeck, Russ J. Van Dissen, Nicola J. Litchfield, P. M. Barnes, Andy Nicol, Rob M. Langridge, David J. A. Barrell, Pilar Villamor, Susan M. Ellis & Mark S. Rattenbury
Fault models developed by the scientific community aim to provide a consistent and broadly agreed-upon representation of faults in a region for such societally important endeavours as seismic hazard assessment (e.g. national seismic hazard models), strong ground-motion predictions and physics-based fault systems modelling. The New Zealand Community Fault Model (NZ CFM) is a two- and three-dimensional representation of fault zones associated with the New Zealand plate boundary for which Quaternary activity has been established (or...

Pieces in a global puzzle: Population genetics at two whale shark aggregations in the western Indian Ocean

Royale Hardenstine, Song He, Jesse Cochran, Camrin Braun, E. Fernando Cagua, Simon Pierce, Clare Prebble, Christoph Rohner, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Tane Sinclair-Taylor, Gregory Skomal, Simon Thorrold, Alexandra Watts, Casey Zakroff & Michael Berumen
The whale shark Rhincodon typus is found throughout the world’s tropical and warm-temperate ocean basins. Despite their broad physical distribution, research on the species has been concentrated at a few aggregation sites. Comparing DNA sequences from sharks at different sites can provide a demographically neutral understanding of the whale shark’s global ecology. Here, we created genetic profiles for 84 whale sharks from the Saudi Arabian Red Sea and 72 individuals from the coast of Tanzania...

Data from: Blood-red colour as a prey-choice cue for mosquito specialist predators

Lisa Taylor, Fiona Cross & Robert Jackson
Specialist predators are innately and distinctively proficient at targeting specific prey types. This is enabled by behavioural, perceptual, and cognitive mechanisms that can only be understood using carefully-designed experiments. Evarcha culicivora is an East African jumping spider that feeds on vertebrate blood acquired indirectly by actively targeting blood-carrying female mosquitoes as preferred prey. Here we asked whether these spiders use the colour red to locate this prey. In Objective 1, we used spectrophotometry to document...

Scale-dependent environmental effects on phenotypic distributions in Heliconius butterflies

Ananda Regina Pereira Martins, Lucas Pereira Martins, Wing-Zheng Ho, W. Owen McMillan, Jonathan S. Ready & Rowan Barrett
Examining how environmental factors influence phenotypic distribution might provide valuable information about local adaptation, divergence, and speciation. The red-yellow Müllerian mimicry ring of Heliconius butterflies displays a wide range of color patterns across the Neotropics and is involved in several hybrid zones, making it an excellent system to study color phenotypic distribution. Using a multiscale distribution strategy, we studied whether different phenotypes of the distantly related species H. erato and H. melpomene, belonging to the...

New Zealand National Seismic Hazard Model 2022 revision : model, hazard and process overview

Matt E. Gerstenberger, Sanjay S. Bora, Brendon A. Bradley, Chris DiCaprio, Russ J. Van Dissen, G. M. Atkinson, Chris Chamberlain, Annemarie Christophersen, Kate J. Clark & Genevieve L. Coffey
The New Zealand National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM) 2022 revision has involved significant revision of all datasets and model components. In this report, we present a subset of the many results from the model, as well as an overview of the governance, scientific and review processes followed by the NSHM team. The NSHM 2022 models and results are available online, and more extensive results can be found at http://gns.cri.nz/nshm. (The authors)

Genomic trajectories of a near-extinction event in the Chatham Island black robin

Johanna von Seth, Tom van der Valk, Edana Lord, Hanna Sigeman, Remi-André Olsen, Michael Knapp, Olga Kardailsky, Fiona Robertson, Marie Hale, Dave Houston, Euan Kennedy, Love Dalén, Karin Norén, Melanie Massaro, Bruce C. Robertson & Nicolas Dussex
Abstract Background Understanding the micro-­evolutionary response of populations to demographic declines is a major goal in evolutionary and conservation biology. In small populations, genetic drift can lead to an accumulation of deleterious mutations, which will increase the risk of extinction. However, demographic recovery can still occur after extreme declines, suggesting that natural selection may purge deleterious mutations, even in extremely small populations. The Chatham Island black robin (Petroica traversi) is arguably the most inbred bird...

Data and code: Global and regional ecological boundaries explain abrupt spatial discontinuities in avian frugivory interactions

Lucas P. Martins, Daniel B. Stouffer, Pedro G. Blendinger, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, Galo Buitrón-Jurado, Marta Correia, José Miguel Costa, D. Matthias Dehling, Camila I. Donatti, Carine Emer, Mauro Galetti, Ruben Heleno, Pedro Jordano, Ícaro Menezes, José Carlos Morante-Filho, Marcia C. Muñoz, Eike Lena Neuschulz, Marco Aurélio Pizo, Marta Quitián, Roman A. Ruggera, Francisco Saavedra, Vinicio Santillán, Virginia Sanz D’Angelo, Matthias Schleuning, Luís Pascoal Da Silva … & Jason M. Tylianakis
Species interactions can propagate disturbances across space via direct and indirect effects, potentially connecting species at a global scale. However, ecological and biogeographic boundaries may mitigate this spread by demarcating the limits of ecological networks. We tested whether large-scale ecological boundaries (ecoregions and biomes) and human disturbance gradients increase dissimilarity among plant-frugivore networks, while accounting for background spatial and elevational gradients and differences in network sampling. We assessed network dissimilarity patterns over a broad spatial...

Latitudinal influences on bryozoan calcification through the Paleozoic

Catherine Reid, Patrick N Wyse Jackson &
Bryozoans are active non-phototrophic biomineralizers that precipitate their calcareous skeletons in sea-water. Carbonate saturation states vary temporally and spatially in Paleozoic oceans, and we used the Bryozoan Skeletal Index (BSI) to investigate whether bryozoan calcification is controlled by seawater chemistry in Paleozoic trepostome and cryptostome bryozoans. Our results show that cryptostome bryozoan genera are influenced by ocean chemistry throughout the Paleozoic and precipitate the most calcite per autozooid at lower latitudes, where carbonate saturation states...

Allopatric speciation in the bacterial phylum Aquificota enables genus-level endemism in Aotearoa-New Zealand

Matthew Stott

The legacies of land-clearance and trophic downgrading accumulate to affect structure and function of kelp forests

Stephen Wing, Nicholas Shears, Leigh Tait & David Schiel
Aotearoa New Zealand is the last major landmass settled by people, and therefore provides a recent record of ecological legacy effects in the coastal zone. Large-scale land clearances of forests accelerated over the last century, affecting the concentration of suspended sediments, light environment and nutrient composition on rocky reefs, and consequently the distribution, abundance and composition of algal forests. Environmental effects were compounded in many places by overfishing and long-term declines of large predatory species,...

Additional file 2 of Genomic trajectories of a near-extinction event in the Chatham Island black robin

Johanna von Seth, Tom van der Valk, Edana Lord, Hanna Sigeman, Remi-André Olsen, Michael Knapp, Olga Kardailsky, Fiona Robertson, Marie Hale, Dave Houston, Euan Kennedy, Love Dalén, Karin Norén, Melanie Massaro, Bruce C. Robertson & Nicolas Dussex
Additional file 2.

Evaluation of empirical ground-motion models for New Zealand application

R. L. Lee, Brendon A. Bradley, Elena F. Manea & J. Hutchinson
This report presents an evaluation of empirical ground-motion models for shallow crustal, subduction interface and subduction slab earthquakes using a recently developed New Zealand ground-motion database. The evaluation considers both New-Zealand-specific and international models, which require validation to ensure their applicability in a New Zealand context. A quantitative comparison between the models is undertaken based on intensity measure residuals and a mixed-effects regression framework. The results are subsequently investigated to assess how the models are...

From performance curves to performance surfaces: Interactive effects of temperature and oxygen availability on aerobic and anaerobic performance in the common wall lizard

Rory Telemeco, Eric Gangloff, G. Antonio Cordero, Essie Rodgers & Fabien Aubret
1. Accurately predicting the responses of organisms to novel or changing environments requires the development of ecologically-appropriate experimental methodology and process-based models. 2. For ectotherms, thermal performance curves (TPCs) have provided a useful framework to describe how organismal performance is dependent on temperature. However, this approach often lacks a mechanistic underpinning, which limits our ability to use thermal performance curves predictively. Further, thermal dependence varies across traits, and performance is also limited by additional abiotic...

New Zealand National Seismic Hazard Model 2022: earthquake recurrence derivation from paleoseismic data and probability of detection

Genevieve L. Coffey, Chris Rollins, Russ J. Van Dissen, David A. Rhoades, Kiran K.S. Thingbaijam, Kate J. Clark, Matt C. Gerstenberger, Nicola J. Litchfield & Andy Nicol
This report presents results of recurrence interval derivation and probability of surface rupture detection studies undertaken for the New Zealand National Seismic Hazard Model 2022 (NSHM) update. Recurrence intervals are one of numerous inversion constraints that are used to constrain the rate of fault ruptures. Here, we utilise earthquake timings, single-event displacement and slip-rate data from the Paleoseismic Site Database, along with geologic and geodetic slip rates from the New Zealand Community Fault Model v1.0...

Factors limiting plant recruitment in a Tropical Afromontane Forest

Iveren Abiem, Ian Dickie, David Kenfack & Hazel Chapman
Predicting how forest species composition may change in response to global change is essential for meaningful management. Which species are most likely to successfully recruit depends on a multitude of factors, but processes operating at the seed-to-seedling transition being especially important. Here we explore how insufficient seed dispersal (dispersal limitation) and ecological filtering of seedlings (establishment limitation) influence species recruitment in an Afromontane Forest. We combined census data from seeds in seed traps and seed-seedling...

Genomic trajectories of a near-extinction event in the Chatham Island black robin

Johanna von Seth, Tom van der Valk, Edana Lord, Hanna Sigeman, Remi-André Olsen, Michael Knapp, Olga Kardailsky, Fiona Robertson, Marie Hale, Dave Houston, Euan Kennedy, Love Dalén, Karin Norén, Melanie Massaro, Bruce C. Robertson & Nicolas Dussex
Abstract Background Understanding the micro-­evolutionary response of populations to demographic declines is a major goal in evolutionary and conservation biology. In small populations, genetic drift can lead to an accumulation of deleterious mutations, which will increase the risk of extinction. However, demographic recovery can still occur after extreme declines, suggesting that natural selection may purge deleterious mutations, even in extremely small populations. The Chatham Island black robin (Petroica traversi) is arguably the most inbred bird...

Summary of the ground-motion characterisation model for the 2022 New Zealand National Seismic Hazard Model

Brendon A. Bradley, Sanjay Bora, R. L. Lee, Elena F. Manea, Matt C. Gerstenberger, P. J. Stafford, G. M. Atkinson, G. Weatherill, J. Hutchinson & C. A. de la Torre
This document provides a high-level summary of the ground-motion characterisation model component of the 2022 New Zealand National Seismic Hazard Model. This includes: development of a New-Zealand-specific ground-motion database; consideration of alternative empirical ground-motion models based on global datasets; two new New-Zealand-specific models that were developed as part of the project; comparisons of the alternative models against observational data; and considered modifications of the ‘base’ models to account for near-fault directivity, back-arc attenuation for subduction...

Litter decomposition rates across tropical montane and lowland forests are controlled foremost by climate

Rebecca Ostertag, Carla Restrepo, Iveren Abeim, Roxana Aragón, Michelle Ataroff, Hazel Chapman, Belen Fadrique, Grizelle González, Achim Häger, Jürgen Homeier, Luis Daniel Llambí, Rikke Reese Næsborg, Laura Nohemy Poma López, Jorge Andrés Ramirez Correa, Klara Scharnagl, Conrado Tobón, James W. Dalling, Patrick H. Martin, Iveren Abiem, Shin‐Ichiro Aiba, Esteban Alvarez‐Dávila, Augusta Y. Cueva‐Agila, Romina D. Fernández, Sybil G. Gotsch, Carlos Iñiguez‐Armijos … & Cameron B. Williams
The “hierarchy of factors” hypothesis states that decomposition rates are controlled primarily by climatic, followed by biological and soil variables. Tropical montane forests (TMF) are globally important ecosystems, yet there have been limited efforts to provide a biome-scale characterization of litter decomposition. We designed a common litter decomposition experiment replicated in 23 tropical montane sites across the Americas, Asia, and Africa and combined these results with a previous study of 23 sites in tropical lowland...

Registration Year

  • 2022
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Affiliations

  • University of Canterbury
    32
  • GNS Science
    10
  • Lund University
    7
  • University of Otago
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  • Charles Sturt University
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  • Department of Conservation
    5
  • University of Oulu
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  • Uppsala University
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  • Stockholm University
    5
  • Swedish Museum of Natural History
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