32 Works

Data from: Rapid prey evolution can alter the structure of predator-prey communities

Ville-Petri Friman, Alexandre Jousset, Angus Buckling & V.-P. Friman
Although microevolution has been shown to play an important role in pairwise antagonistic species interactions, its importance in more complex communities has received little attention. Here, we used two Pseudomonas fluorescens prey bacterial strains (SBW25 and F113) and Tetrahymena thermophila protist predator to study how rapid evolution affects the structuring of predator–prey communities. Both bacterial strains coexisted in the absence of predation, and F113 was competitively excluded in the presence of both SBW25 and predator...

Data from: Singing in the moonlight: dawn song performance of a diurnal bird varies with lunar phase

Jennifer E. York, Andrew J. Young & Andrew N. Radford
It is well established that the lunar cycle can affect the behaviour of nocturnal animals, but its potential to have a similar influence on diurnal species has received less research attention. Here we demonstrate that the dawn song of a cooperative songbird, the white-browed sparrow weaver (Plocepasser mahali), varies with moon phase. When the moon was above the horizon at dawn, males began singing on average 10 minutes earlier if there was a full moon...

Data from: Size-dependent physiological responses of shore crabs to single and repeated playback of ship noise

Matthew A. Wale, Stephen D. Simpson & Andrew N. Radford
Anthropogenic noise has fundamentally changed the acoustics of terrestrial and aquatic environments, and there is growing empirical evidence that even a single noise exposure can impact behaviour in a variety of vertebrate organisms. Here we use controlled experiments to investigate how the physiology of a marine invertebrate, the shore crab (Carcinus maenas), is affected by both single and repeated exposure to ship-noise playback. Crabs experiencing ship-noise playback consumed more oxygen, indicating a higher metabolic rate...

Data from: A trade-off between oxidative stress resistance and DNA repair plays a role in the evolution of elevated mutation rates in bacteria

Clara Torres-Barceló, Gabriel Cabot, Antonio Oliver, Angus Buckling, R. Craig MacLean & C. Torres-Barcelo
The dominant paradigm for the evolution of mutator alleles in bacterial populations is that they spread by indirect selection for linked beneficial mutations when bacteria are poorly adapted. In this paper, we challenge the ubiquity of this paradigm by demonstrating that a clinically important stressor, hydrogen peroxide, generates direct selection for an elevated mutation rate in the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a consequence of a trade-off between the fidelity of DNA repair and hydrogen...

Data from: Defeating crypsis: detection and learning of camouflage strategies

Jolyon Troscianko, Alice E. Lown, Anna E. Hughes & Martin Stevens
Camouflage is perhaps the most widespread defence against predators in nature and an active area of interdisciplinary research. Recent work has aimed to understand what camouflage types exist (e.g. background matching, disruptive, and distractive patterns) and their effectiveness. However, work has almost exclusively focused on the efficacy of these strategies in preventing initial detection, despite the fact that predators often encounter the same prey phenotype repeatedly, affording them opportunities to learn to find those prey...

Data from: Bacterial motility confers fitness advantage in the presence of phages

Tiffany B. Taylor & Angus Buckling
Dispersal provides the opportunity to escape harm and colonize new patches, enabling populations to expand and persist. However, the benefits of dispersal associated with escaping harm will be dependent on the structure of the environment and the likelihood of escape. Here, we empirically investigate how the spatial distribution of a parasite influences the evolution of host dispersal. Bacteriophages are a strong and common threat for bacteria in natural environments and offer a good system with...

Data from: The availability of research data declines rapidly with article age

Timothy H. Vines, Arianne Y. K. Albert, Rose L. Andrew, Florence Débarre, Dan G. Bock, Michelle T. Franklin, Kimberly J. Gilbert, Jean-Sébastien Moore, Sébastien Renaut & Diana J. Rennison
Policies ensuring that research data are available on public archives are increasingly being implemented at the government, funding agency, and journal level. These policies are predicated on the idea that authors are poor stewards of their data, particularly over the long term, and indeed many studies have found that authors are often unable or unwilling to share their data. However, there are no systematic estimates of how the availability of research data changes with time...

Data from: No association between sperm competition and sperm length variation across dung flies (Scathophagidae)

Manmohan D. Sharma, Aria M. Minder & David J. Hosken
Sperm length is extremely variable across species, but a general explanation for this variation is lacking. However, when the risk of sperm competition is high, sperm length is predicted to be less variable within species, and there is some evidence for this in birds and social insects. Here, we examined intraspecific variation in sperm length, both within and between males, and its potential associations with sperm competition risk and variation in female reproductive tract morphology...

Data from: Wing shape variation associated with mimicry in butterflies

Robert Tyrrell Jones, Yann Le Poul, Annabel C. Whibley, Claire Mérot, Richard H. Ffrench-Constant & Mathieu Joron
Mimetic resemblance in unpalatable butterflies has been studied by evolutionary biologists for over a century, but has largely focused on the convergence in wing color patterns. In Heliconius numata, discrete color-pattern morphs closely resemble co-mimics in the distantly-related genus Melinaea. We examine the possibility that the shape of the butterfly wing also shows adaptive convergence. First, simple measures of forewing dimensions were taken of individuals in a cross between H. numata morphs, and showed quantitative...

Data from: Fluctuating temperature leads to evolution of thermal generalism and preadaptation to novel environments

Tarmo Ketola, Lauri Mikonranta, Ji Zhang, Kati Saarinen, Ville-Petri Friman, Anni-Maria Örmälä, Johanna Mappes & Jouni Laakso
Environmental fluctuations can select for generalism, which is also hypothesized to increase organisms’ ability to invade novel environments. Here, we show that across a range of temperatures, opportunistic bacterial pathogen Serratia marcescens that evolved in fluctuating temperature (daily variation between 24°C and 38°C, mean 31°C) outperforms the strains that evolved in constant temperature (31°C). The growth advantage was also evident in novel environments in the presence of parasitic viruses and predatory protozoans, but less clear...

Data from: Female mate preferences for male body size and shape promote sexual isolation in threespine sticklebacks

Megan L. Head, Genevieve M. Kozak & Janette W. Boughman
Female mate preferences for ecologically relevant traits may enhance natural selection, leading to rapid divergence. They may also forge a link between mate choice within species and sexual isolation between species. Here, we examine female mate preference for two ecologically important traits: body size and body shape. We measured female preferences within and between species of benthic, limnetic, and anadromous threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus species complex). We found that mate preferences differed between species and...

Data from: Male age mediates reproductive investment and response to paternity assurance

Kyle M. Benowitz, Megan L. Head, Camellia A. Williams, Allen J. Moore & Nick J. Royle
Theory predicts that male response to reduced paternity will depend on male state and interactions between the sexes. If there is little chance of reproducing again, then males should invest heavily in current offspring, regardless of their share in paternity. We tested this by manipulating male age and paternity assurance in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides. We found older males invested more in both mating effort and parental effort than younger males. Furthermore, male age,...

Data from: The impact of Wolbachia, male age and mating history on cytoplasmic incompatibility and sperm transfer in Drosophila simulans

Znmako A. Awrahman, Fleur Champion De Crespigny & Nina Wedell
Most insects harbour a variety of maternally inherited endosymbionts, the most widespread being Wolbachia pipientis that commonly induce cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) and reduced hatching success in crosses between infected males and uninfected females. High temperature and increasing male age are known to reduce the level of CI in a variety of insects. In Drosophila simulans, infected males have been shown to mate at a higher rate than uninfected males. By examining the impact of mating...

Data from: Causes of male sexual trait divergence in introduced populations of guppies

Anna K. Lindholm, Megan L. Head, Robert C. Brooks, Lee A. Rollins, Fiona C. Ingleby & Susanne R. K. Zajitschek
Males from different populations of the same species often differ in their sexually selected traits. Variation in sexually selected traits can be attributed to sexual selection if phenotypic divergence matches the direction of sexual selection gradients among populations. However, phenotypic divergence of sexually selected traits may also be influenced by other factors, such as natural selection and genetic constraints. Here, we document differences in male sexual traits among six introduced Australian populations of guppies and...

Data from: The evolution of bacterial mutation rates under simultaneous selection by inter-specific and social parasitism

Siobhán O'Brien, Antonio M. M. Rodrigues & A. Buckling
Many bacterial populations harbour substantial numbers of hypermutable bacteria, in spite of hypermutation being associated with deleterious mutations. One reason for the persistence of hypermutators is the provision of novel mutations, enabling rapid adaptation to continually changing environments, for example coevolving virulent parasites. However, hypermutation also increases the rate at which intraspecific parasites (social cheats) are generated. Interspecific and intraspecific parasitism are therefore likely to impose conflicting selection pressure on mutation rate. Here, we combine...

Data from: Flexible mate choice when mates are rare and time is short

Robin M. Tinghitella, Emily G. Weigel, Megan Head & Janette W. Boughman
Female mate choice is much more dynamic than we once thought. Mating decisions depend on both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, and these two may interact with one another. In this study, we investigate how responses to the social mating environment (extrinsic) change as individuals age (intrinsic). We first conducted a field survey to examine the extent of natural variation in mate availability in a population of threespine sticklebacks. We then manipulated the sex ratio in...

Data from: Limited plasticity in the phenotypic variance-covariance matrix for male advertisement calls in the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus

William R. Pitchers, Robert Brooks, Michael D. Jennions, Tom Tregenza, Ian Dworkin & John Hunt
Phenotypic integration and plasticity are central to our understanding of how complex phenotypic traits evolve. Evolutionary change in complex quantitative traits can be predicted using the multivariate breeders’ equation, but such predictions are only accurate if the matrices involved are stable over evolutionary time. Recent study, however, suggests that these matrices are temporally plastic, spatially variable and themselves evolvable. The data available on phenotypic variance-covariance matrix (P) stability are sparse, and largely focused on morphological...

Data from: Extra-group mating increases inbreeding risk in a cooperatively breeding bird

Xavier A. Harrison, Jennifer E. York, Dominic L. Cram & Andrew J. Young
In many cooperatively-breeding species females mate extra-group, the adaptive value of which remains poorly understood. One hypothesis posits that females employ extra-group mating to access mates whose genotypes are more dissimilar to their own than their social mates’, so as to increase offspring heterozygosity. We test this hypothesis using life-history and genetic data from 36 cooperatively-breeding white-browed sparrow weaver (Plocepasser mahali) groups. Contrary to prediction, a dominant female’s relatedness to her social mate did not...

Data from: Stress hormone receptors change as range expansion progresses in house sparrows

Andrea L. Liebl & Lynn B. Martin
As ranges expand, individuals encounter different environments at the periphery than at the centre of the range. Previously, we have shown that glucocorticoids (GCs) vary with range expansion: individuals at the range edge release more GCs in response to restraint. Here, we measured hippocampal mRNA expression of GC receptors (mineralocorticoid, MR and glucocorticoid, GR) in eight house sparrow (Passer domesticus) populations varying in age. We found that individuals closest to the range edge had the...

Data from: Important impacts of tissue selection and lipid extraction on ecological parameters derived from stable isotope ratios

Matthew J. Perkins, Robbie A. McDonald, F. J. Frank Van Veen, Simon D. Kelly, Gareth Rees & Stuart Bearhop
1. The nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) isotope ratios of animal tissues can help identify the composition of diets and open up a myriad of ecological applications. However, consumers do not ingest or assimilate all components of food items, and it is not well understood how sampling different tissues of sources and consumers may affect isotopic values ascribed, and thereby how such variation affects derived ecological measures. 2. Utilising a simple prey–predator feeding relationship in...

Southern Ocean procellariform blood and feather stable isotope data

T.W. Bodey, E.J. Ward, R.A. Phillips, R.A.R. McGill & S. Bearhop
This dataset comprises the delta-13C and delta-15N stable isotopic information from two tissue samples (whole blood and mantle feathers) from 16 adults of 8 species of Southern Ocean procellariform collected at Bird Island, South Georgia during the austral summer 2001-2002. There have been numerous long-term research projects carried out at Bird Island under the auspices of the British Antarctic Survey, and this data represents one very small component that has been used to examine inter-specific...

Data from: Polymorphisms at the innate immune receptor TLR2 are associated with Borrelia infection in a wild rodent population

Barbara Tschirren, Martin Andersson, Kristin Scherman, Helena Westerdahl, Peer R. E. Mittl & Lars Raberg
The discovery of the key role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in initiating innate immune responses and modulating adaptive immunity has revolutionised our understanding of vertebrate defence against pathogens. Yet, despite their central role in pathogen recognition and defence initiation, there is little information on how variation in TLRs influences disease susceptibility in natural populations. Here we assessed the extent of naturally occurring polymorphisms at TLR2 in wild bank voles (Myodes glareolus) and tested for associations...

Data from: Experimental evolution reveals trade-offs between mating and immunity

Kathryn B. McNamara, Nina Wedell & Leigh W. Simmons
Immune system maintenance and upregulation is costly. Sexual selection intensity, which increases male investment into reproductive traits, is expected to create trade-offs with immune function. We assayed phenoloxidase (PO) and lytic activity of individuals from populations of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, which had been evolving under different intensities of sexual selection. We found significant divergence among populations, with males from female-biased populations having lower PO activity than males from balanced sex ratio or...

Data from: Inbreeding reveals mode of past selection on male reproductive characters in Drosophila melanogaster

Outi Ala-Honkola, David J. Hosken, Mollie K. Manier, Stefan Lüpold, Elizabeth M. Droge-Young, Kirstin S. Berben, William F. Collins, John M. Belote & Scott Pitnick
Directional dominance is a prerequisite of inbreeding depression. Directionality arises when selection drives alleles that increase fitness to fixation and eliminates dominant deleterious alleles, while deleterious recessives are hidden from it and maintained at low frequencies. Traits under directional selection (i.e., fitness traits) are expected to show directional dominance and therefore an increased susceptibility to inbreeding depression. In contrast, traits under stabilizing selection or weakly linked to fitness are predicted to exhibit little-to-no inbreeding depression....

Data from: Generalist insects behave in a jasmonate-dependent manner on their host plants, leaving induced areas quickly and staying longer on distant parts

Lynda E. Perkins, Bronwen W. Cribb, Philip B. Brewer, Jim Hanan, Murray Grant, Marta De Torres & Myron P. Zalucki
Plants are sessile so have evolved sensitive ways to detect attacking herbivores, and sophisticated strategies to effectively defend themselves. Insect herbivory induces synthesis of the phytohormone jasmonic acid which activates downstream metabolic pathways for various chemical defences such as toxins and digestion inhibitors. Insects are also sophisticated animals, and many have co-evolved physiological adaptations that negate this induced plant defence. Insect behaviour has rarely been studied in the context of induced plant defence, although behavioural...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    32

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    32

Affiliations

  • University of Exeter
    32
  • University of Bristol
    3
  • Michigan State University
    3
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2
  • UNSW Sydney
    2
  • University of Oxford
    2
  • Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • University of Oviedo
    1