78 Works

Data from: Genotype-by-sex-by-diet interactions for nutritional preference, dietary consumption and lipid deposition in a field cricket

James Rapkin, Kim Jensen, Clarissa M. House, Alastair J. Wilson & John Hunt
Changes in feeding behaviour, especially the over-consumption of calories, has led to a rise in the rates of obesity, diabetes and other associated disorders in humans and a range of animals inhabiting human-influenced environments. However, understanding the relative contribution of genes, the nutritional environment and their interaction to dietary intake and lipid deposition in the sexes still remains a major challenge. By combining nutritional geometry with quantitative genetics, we determined the effect of genes, the...

Data from: Fish in habitats with higher motorboat disturbance show reduced sensitivity to motorboat noise

Harry R. Harding, Timothy A.C. Gordon, Rachel E. Hsuan, Alex C.E. Mackaness, Andrew N. Radford, Stephen D. Simpson, Alex C. E. Mackaness & Timothy A. C. Gordon
Anthropogenic noise can negatively impact many taxa worldwide. It is possible that in noisy, high-disturbance environments the range and severity of impacts could diminish over time, but the influence of previous disturbance remains untested in natural conditions. This study demonstrates effects of motorboat noise on the physiology of an endemic cichlid fish in Lake Malaŵi. Exposure to motorboats driven 20–100 m from fish and loudspeaker-playback of motorboat noise both elevated oxygen-consumption rate at a single...

Data from: The early-life environment and individual plasticity in life history

Ornela De Gasperin, Ana Duarte, Sinead English, Alfredo Attisano & Rebecca M. Kilner
We tested whether the early-life environment can influence the extent of individual plasticity in a life history trait. We asked: can the early-life environment explain why, in response to the same adult environmental cue, some individuals invest more than others in current reproduction? And can it additionally explain why investment in current reproduction trades off against survival in some individuals, but is positively correlated with survival in others? We addressed these questions using the burying...

Data from: The costs of kleptoparasitism: a study of mixed-species seabird breeding colonies

Davide Gaglio, Richard B. Sherley, Timothée R. Cook, Peter G. Ryan & Tom Flower
Mixed-species assemblages are common in nature, providing mutual benefits to associating species including anti-predator advantages or resource facilitation. However, associating with other species may also impose costs through kleptoparasitism (food theft). Identification of these costs, and how they vary when different species breed alongside one another, is essential to understand the payoffs of mixed-species assemblages. We explore the costs of kleptoparasitism for greater crested terns Thalasseus bergii provisioning offspring at a single-species colony, where individuals...

Data from: Specific adaptation to strong competitors can offset the negative effects of population size reductions

Xin-Feng Zhao, Angus Buckling, Quan-Guo Zhang & Elze Hesse
Competition plays a crucial role in determining adaptation of species, yet we know little as to how adaptation is affected by the strength of competition. On the one hand, strong competition typically results in population size reductions, which can hamper adaptation due to a shortage of beneficial mutations; on the other hand, specificity of adaptation to competitors may offset the negative evolutionary consequences of such population size effects. Here, we investigate how competition strength affects...

Data from: Effects of increased N and P availability on biomass allocation and root carbohydrate reserves differ between N‐fixing and non‐N‐fixing savanna tree seedlings

Varun Varma, Arockia M. Catherin & Mahesh Sankaran
In mixed tree‐grass ecosystems, tree recruitment is limited by demographic bottlenecks to seedling establishment arising from inter‐ and intra‐life‐form competition, and disturbances such as fire. Enhanced nutrient availability resulting from anthropogenic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) deposition can alter the nature of these bottlenecks by changing seedling growth and biomass allocation patterns, and lead to longer‐term shifts in tree community composition if different plant functional groups respond differently to increased nutrient availability. However, the extent...

Data from: Temperature drives diversification in a model adaptive radiation

Quan-Guo Zhang, Han-Shu Lu & Angus Buckling
The warmer regions harbor more species, attributable to accelerated speciation and increased ecological opportunities for coexistence. While correlations between temperature and energy availability and habitat area have been suggested as major drivers of these biodiversity patterns, temperature can theoretically also have direct effects on the evolution of diversity. Here we experimentally studied the evolution of diversity in a model adaptive radiation of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens across a temperature gradient. Diversification increased at higher temperatures,...

Data from: The foot is more than a spring: human foot muscles perform work to adapt to the energetic requirements of locomotion

Ryan Riddick, Dominic J. Farris & Luke A. Kelly
The foot has been considered both as an elastic mechanism that increases the efficiency of locomotion by recycling energy, as well as an energy sink that helps stabilize movement by dissipating energy through contact with the ground. We measured the activity of two intrinsic foot muscles, Flexor Digitorum Brevis (FDB) and Abductor Hallucis (AH), as well as the mechanical work performed by the foot as a whole and at a modelled plantar muscle tendon unit...

Data from: Territorial defence in a network: audiences only matter to male crabs primed for confrontation

Safi K. Darden, Maggie K. May, Natasha K. Boyland, Torben Dabelsteen, Safi K Darden, Maggie K May & Natasha K Boyland
Territorial contests often occur in the presence of conspecifics not directly involved in the interaction. Actors may alter their behaviour in the presence of this audience, an ‘audience effect’, and audiences themselves may alter their behaviour as a result of observing an interaction, a ‘bystander effect’. Previous work has documented these effects by looking at each in isolation, but to our knowledge, none has investigated their interaction; something that is more likely to represent a...

Data from: No evidence of quantitative signal honesty across species of aposematic burnet moths (Lepidoptera: Zygaenidae)

Emmanuelle S. Briolat, Mika Zagrobelny, Carl E. Olsen, Jonathan D. Blount & Martin Stevens
Many defended species use conspicuous visual warning signals to deter potential predators from attacking. Traditional theory holds that these signals should converge on similar forms, yet variation in visual traits and the levels of defensive chemicals is common, both within and between species. It is currently unclear how the strength of signals and potency of defences might be related: conflicting theories suggest that aposematic signals should be quantitatively honest, or, in contrast, that investment in...

Natural enemies of crop pests in oilseed rape fields in relation to local plant diversity and landscape characteristics

R.F. Shaw, J.K. Pell, J.W. Redhead, J.M. Bullock & J.L. Osborne
The number and type of natural enemies of crop pests found in winter-sown oilseed rape fields (Brassica napus L.) in relation to local plant diversity (in crop and field margin) and landscape characteristics. Natural enemies and pests were collected using two methods (suction sampling and pitfall traps). Local plant diversity was assessed using quadrats in field margins and in cropped area. The presence of hedges was also recorded. Landscape characteristics include the amount of mass...

Movement of songbirds between supplementary feeders in urban neighbourhoods in Southern England, UK

D.T.C. Cox & K.J. Gaston
This dataset contains the time, date and location of when songbirds fitted with a Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT tag) visited a bird feeder fitted with Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology. We tagged seven species (n = 348), with Blue tits and Great tits being the most abundantly caught. RFID bird feeders were set up in networks of 20 feeders each in urban gardens at three sites in Southern England.

Drosophila C virus genomes, Cambridge (2017)

F.M. Jiggins & B. Longdon
The resource consists of genome sequence data for the Drosophila C virus that has been serially passaged through different species of Drosophila in the laboratory. The genomes were sequenced and aligned to the reference genome. The frequency of variants at both biallelic and triallelic sites was then calculated. We also generated a phylogeny of the species involved using published data. This data was generated to understand how viruses adapt to new host species by Francis...

Natural wetland methane and permafrost thaw feedback modelling with JULES-IMOGEN (1850-2100)

E. Comyn-Platt, G. Hayman, C. Huntingford, S.E. Chadburn, E. J. Burke, A.B. Harper, W.J. Collins, C.P. Webber, T. Powell, P.M. Cox, N. Gedney & S. Sitch
These data contain 408 instances of annual model output from JULES/IMOGEN simulations, covering the period between 1850-2100. Each simulation (which corresponds to one netcdf file) provides annual average of carbon stocks of the land, atmosphere and ocean store required to calculate the anthropogenic fossil fuel emissions as the residual of the yearly changes. Also included are the global warming variables, fractional land-cover, natural wetland extent and methane (CH4) flux and the soil temperature and moisture...

Data from: Individual variation and the source-sink group dynamics of extra-group paternity in a social mammal

Paula H. Marjamaki, Hannah L. Dugdale, Deborah A. Dawson, Robbie A. McDonald, Richard Delahay, Terry Burke & Alastair J. Wilson
Movement of individuals, or their genes, can influence eco-evolutionary processes in structured populations. We have limited understanding of the extent to which spatial behaviour varies among groups and individuals within populations. Here we use genetic pedigree reconstruction in a long-term study of European badgers (Meles meles) to characterise the extent of extra-group paternity, occurring as a consequence of breeding excursions, and to test hypothesised drivers of variation at multiple levels. We jointly estimate parentage and...

Data from: Variation in defence strategies in the metal hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens is indicative of synergies and trade-offs between forms of defence

Helen N. Fones, Gail M. Preston & J. Andrew C. Smith
The metal hyperaccumulator, N. caerulescens, uses metals as a defence against pathogens. Earlier work has suggested both trade-offs and synergies between metals and inducible defences. Different populations of N. caerulescens vary in metal accumulation. Here, we test the hypothesis that this produces different outcomes in trade-offs between defences. We compare zinc concentrations, glucosinolate concentrations, and inducible stress responses, including ROS and cell death, in four N. caerulescens populations, and relate these to the growth of...

Data from: Social structure contains epidemics and regulates individual roles in disease transmission in a group-living mammal

Carly Rozins, Matthew J. Silk, Darren P. Croft, Richard J. Delahay, Dave J. Hodgson, Robbie A. McDonald, Nicola Weber & Mike Boots
Population structure is critical to infectious disease transmission. As a result, theoretical and empirical contact networks models of infectious disease spread are increasingly providing valuable insights into wildlife epidemiology. Analysing an exceptionally detailed data set on contact structure within a high-density population of European badgers Meles meles, we show that a modular contact network produced by spatially structured stable social groups, lead to smaller epidemics, particularly for infections with intermediate transmissibility. The key advance is...

Data from: Global patterns of the double mutualism phenomenon

Francisco Fuster, Christopher Kaiser-Bunbury, Jens M. Olesen & Anna Traveset
A double mutualism (DM) occurs when two interacting species benefit each other in two different functions, e.g. when an animal species acts both as pollinator and seed disperser of the same plant. Besides the double benefit, a DM also imposes a larger risk to both functions if the performance of one partner declines. We conducted the first global review of DMs involving pollinators and seed dispersers, aiming to: (1) assess their prevalence across ecosystems and...

Data from: Assessing reliance on vector navigation in the long-distance oceanic migrations of green sea turtles

Giulia Cerritelli, Giuseppe Bianco, Giacomo Santini, Annette C. Broderick, Brendan J. Godley, Graeme C. Hays, Paolo Luschi, Susanne Åkesson, Graeme C Hays, Annette C Broderick & Brendan J Godley
Vector navigation, i.e. maintaining a constant heading for a given amount of time, is hypothesized to provide a viable basis for the navigational feats of a number of long-distance animal migrants. Since animals following this strategy are subject to drift by wind or by ocean current, performing long migrations relying on vector navigation is particularly challenging. We tested whether vector navigation could be involved in the migrations of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) that migrate between...

Data from: Bumble-BEEHAVE: a systems model for exploring multifactorial causes of bumblebee decline at individual, colony, population and community level

Matthias A. Becher, Grace Twiston-Davies, Tim D. Penny, Dave Goulson, Ellen L. Rotheray, Juliet L. Osborne & Grace Twiston‐Davies
1. Worldwide declines in pollinators, including bumblebees, are attributed to a multitude of stressors such as habitat loss, resource availability, emerging viruses and parasites, exposure to pesticides, and climate change operating at various spatial and temporal scales. Disentangling individual and interacting effects of these stressors, and understanding their impact at the individual, colony and population level is a challenge for systems ecology. Empirical testing of all combinations and contexts is not feasible. A mechanistic multi-level...

Data from: Application of a novel molecular method to age free-living wild Bechstein’s bats

Patrick G.R. Wright, Fiona Mathews, Henry Schofield, Colin Morris, Joe Burrage, Adam Smith, Emma L. Dempster, Patrick B. Hamilton & Patrick G. R. Wright
The age profile of populations fundamentally affects their conservation status. Yet age is frequently difficult to assess in wild animals. Here, we assessed the use of DNA methylation of homologous genes to establish the age structure of a rare and elusive wild mammal: the Bechstein’s bat (Myotis bechsteinii). We collected 62 wing punches from individuals whose ages were known as a result of a long-term banding study. DNA methylation was measured at seven CpG sites...

Data from: Senescent declines in elite tennis players are similar across the sexes

Andreas Sutter, Sam Barton, Manmohan Dev Sharma, Ugofilippo Basellini, David J. Hosken, Catharine Ruth Archer, David J Hosken & C Ruth Archer
Aging is characterized by rising mortality, declining fertility and declines in physiological function with age (functional senescence). Sex-differences in the tempo and severity of survival and fertility declines are widespread, but it is less clear how often, and how much trajectories of functional senescence diverge between the sexes. We tested how physiological function changed with age in male and female elite tennis players using first-serve speed (power) and first-serve accuracy as performance measures. We found...

Data from: Rapid antagonistic coevolution in an emerging pathogen and its vertebrate host

Camille Bonneaud, Mathieu Giraudeau, Luc Tardy, Molly Staley, Geoffrey E. Hill & Kevin J. McGraw
Host-pathogen coevolution is assumed to play a key role in eco-evolutionary processes, including epidemiological dynamics and the evolution of sexual reproduction [1-4]. Despite this, direct evidence for host-pathogen coevolution is exceptional [5-7], particularly in vertebrate hosts. Indeed, although vertebrate hosts have been shown to evolve in response to pathogens or vice versa [8-12], there is little evidence for the necessary reciprocal changes in the success of both antagonists over time [13]. Here, we generate a...

Data from: A high quality pedigree and genetic markers both reveal inbreeding depression for quality but not survival in a cooperative mammal

David A. Wells, Michael A. Cant, Hazel J. Nichols, Joe I. Hoffman & Joseph I. Hoffman
Inbreeding depression, the reduced fitness of offspring of closely related parents, is commonplace in both captive and wild populations and has important consequences for conservation and mating system evolution. However, because of the difficulty of collecting pedigree and life history data from wild populations, relatively few studies have been able to compare inbreeding depression for traits at different points in the life cycle. Moreover, pedigrees give the expected proportion of the genome that is identical...

Data from: A novel approach to wildlife transcriptomics provides evidence of disease-mediated differential expression and changes to the microbiome of amphibian populations

Lewis J. Campbell, S. Austin Hammond, Stephen J. Price, Manmohan D. Sharma, Trenton W.J. Garner, Inanc Birol, Caren C. Helbing, Lena Wilfert, Amber G.F. Griffiths, Trenton W. J. Garner & Stewart A. Hammond
Ranaviruses are responsible for a lethal, emerging infectious disease in amphibians and threaten their populations throughout the world. Despite this, little is known about how amphibian populations respond to ranaviral infection. In the United Kingdom, ranaviruses impact the common frog (Rana temporaria). Extensive public engagement in the study of ranaviruses in the UK has led to the formation of a unique system of field sites containing frog populations of known ranaviral disease history. Within this...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    78

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    78

Affiliations

  • University of Exeter
    78
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    7
  • Lund University
    4
  • University of Copenhagen
    4
  • University of Oxford
    4
  • University of Bath
    3
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • University of Bern
    3
  • Bangor University
    2
  • University of Sussex
    2