101 Works

Limited mass-independent individual variation in resting metabolic rate in a wild population of snow voles (Chionomys nivalis)

Andres Hagmayer, Glauco Camenisch, Cindy Canale, Erik Postma & Timothée Bonnet
Resting metabolic rate (RMR) is a potentially important axis of physiological adaptation to the thermal environment. However, our understanding of the causes and consequences of individual variation in RMR in the wild is hampered by a lack of data, as well as analytical challenges. RMR measurements in the wild are generally characterized by large measurement errors and a strong dependency on mass. The latter is problematic when assessing the ability of RMR to evolve independently...

The roles of temperature, nest predators and information parasites for geographical variation in egg covering behaviour of tits (Paridae)

Olli Loukola, Peter Adamik, Frank Adriaensen, Emilio Barba, Blandine Doligez, Einar Flensted-Jensen, Tapio Eeva, Sami Kivelä, Toni Laaksonen, Chiara Morosinotto, Raivo Mänd, Petri Niemelä, Vladimir Remeš, Jelmer Samplonius, Manrico Sebastiano, Juan Carlos Senar, Tore Slagsvold, Alberto Sorace, Barbara Tschirren, János Török & Jukka Forsman
Aim: Nest building is widespread among animals. Nests may provide receptacles for eggs, developing offspring and the parents, and protect them from adverse environmental conditions. Nests may also indicate the quality of the territory and its owner and can be considered as an extended phenotype of its builder(s). Nests may, thus, function as a sexual and social signal. Here, we examined ecological and abiotic factors—temperature, nest predation and interspecific information utilization—shaping geographical variation in a...

Up in the air: threats to Afromontane biodiversity from climate change and habitat loss revealed by genetic monitoring of the Ethiopian Highlands bat

Orly Razgour, Mohammed Kasso, Helena Santos & Javier Juste
Whilst climate change is recognised as a major future threat to biodiversity, most species are currently threatened by extensive human-induced habitat loss, fragmentation and degradation. Tropical high altitude alpine and montane forest ecosystems and their biodiversity are particularly sensitive to temperature increases under climate change, but they are also subject to accelerated pressures from land conversion and degradation due to a growing human population. We studied the combined effects of anthropogenic land-use change, past and...

The target of selection matters: an established resistance – development-time negative genetic trade-off is not found when selecting on development time.

Lewis Bartlett, Elisa Visher, Yazmin Haro, Katherine Roberts & Mike Boots
Trade-offs are fundamental to evolutionary outcomes and play a central role in eco-evolutionary theory. They are often examined by experimentally selecting on one life-history trait and looking for negative correlations in other traits. For example, populations of the moth Plodia interpunctella selected to resist viral infection show a life-history cost with longer development times. However, we rarely examine whether the detection of such negative genetic correlations depends on the trait on which we select. Here...

Data from: Molecular evolutionary analysis of nematode Zona Pellucida (ZP) modules reveals disulfide-bond reshuffling and standalone ZP-C domains

Cameron Weadick
Zona pellucida (ZP) modules mediate extracellular protein-protein interactions and contribute to important biological processes including syngamy and cellular morphogenesis. While some biomedically-relevant ZP modules are well-studied, little is known about the protein family’s broad-scale diversity and evolution. The increasing availability of sequenced genomes from “non-model” systems provides a valuable opportunity to address this issue, and to use comparative approaches to gain new insights into ZP module biology. Here, through phylogenetic and structural exploration of ZP...

Diversity in CRISPR-based immunity protects susceptible genotypes by restricting phage spread and evolution

Jack Common, David Walker-Sünderhauf, Stineke Van Houte & Edze Westra
Diversity in host resistance often associates with reduced pathogen spread. This may result from ecological and evolutionary processes, likely with feedback between them. Theory and experiments on bacteria-phage interactions have shown that genetic diversity of the bacterial adaptive immune system can limit phage evolution to overcome resistance. Using the CRISPR-Cas bacterial immune system and lytic phage, we engineered a host-pathogen system where each bacterial host genotype could be infected by only one phage genotype. With...

Data from: A regime shift from erosion to carbon accumulation in a temperate northern peatland

Alice Milner, Andy Baird, Sophie Green, Graeme Swindles, Dylan Young, Nicole Sanderson, Madeleine Timmins & Mariusz Gałka
Peatlands are globally important ecosystems but many are degraded and some are eroding. However, some degraded peatlands are undergoing apparently spontaneous recovery, with switches from erosion to renewed carbon accumulation—a type of ecological regime shift. We used a palaeoecological approach to investigate and help understand such a switch in a blanket peatland in North Wales, UK. Our data show: (a) a rapid accumulation of new peat after the switch from the eroding state, with between...

Learning strategies and long-term memory in Asian short-clawed otters (Aonyx cinereus) data

Alexander Saliveros, Eleanor Blyth, Carrie Easter, Georgina Hume, Fraser McAusland, William Hoppitt & Neeltje Boogert
Data submitted here, are those used in the writing of our manuscript entitled "Learning strategies and long-term memory in Asian short-clawed otters (Aonyx cinereus)" which has been submitted to Royal Society Open Science for publication. Abstract for that manuscript is below Social learning, namely learning from information acquired from others or their products, is widespread throughout the animal kingdom. There is growing evidence that animals selectively employ ‘social learning strategies’, which for example, determine when...

Temperature-related body size change of marine benthic macroinvertebrates across the early Toarcian Anoxic Event

Veronica Piazza, Clemens V. Ullmann & Martin Aberhan
The Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (TOAE, Early Jurassic, ~182 Ma ago) was characterised by severe environmental perturbations which led to habitat degradation and extinction of marine species. Warming-induced anoxia is usually identified as main driver, but because marine life was also affected in oxygenated environments the role of raised temperature and its effects on marine life need to be addressed. Body size is a fundamental characteristic of organisms and is expected to decrease as a...

Data from: Genome-wide association analysis of type 2 diabetes in the EPIC-InterAct study

Lina Cai, Eleanor Wheeler, Nicola D. Kerrison, Jian'an Luan, Panos Deloukas, Paul W. Franks, Pilar Amiano, Eva Ardanaz, Catalina Bonet, Guy Fagherazzi, Leif C. Groop, Rudolf Kaaks, José María Huerta, Giovanna Masala, Peter M. Nilsson, Kim Overvad, Valeria Pala, Salvatore Panico, Miguel Rodriguez-Barranco, Olov Rolandsson, Carlotta Sacerdote, Matthias B. Schulze, Annemieke M.W. Spijkeman, Anne Tjonneland, Rosario Tumino … & Nicholas J. Wareham
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a global public health challenge. Whilst the advent of genome-wide association studies has identified >400 genetic variants associated with T2D, our understanding of its biological mechanisms and translational insights is still limited. The EPIC-InterAct project, centred in 8 countries in the European Prospective Investigations into Cancer and Nutrition study, is one of the largest prospective studies of T2D. Established as a nested case-cohort study to investigate the interplay between genetic...

Kin-mediated plasticity in alternative reproductive tactics

Samuel James Lymbery, Joseph Tomkins, Bruno Buzatto & David Hosken
Conditional strategies occur when the fitness payoff an individual receives from expressing a given phenotype (from a range of two or more possible phenotypes) is contingent upon that individual’s environmental circumstances. This conditional strategy model underlies many cases of alternative reproductive tactics, in which individuals of one sex employ different means to obtain reproductive opportunities. How genetic relatedness and indirect fitness effects could affect the expression of alternative reproductive tactics remains unexplored. Here, we address...

Data and code from: Phytoplankton thermal responses adapt in the absence of hard thermodynamic constraints

Dimitrios-Georgios Kontopoulos, Erik Van Sebille, Michael Lange, Gabriel Yvon-Durocher, Timothy G. Barraclough & Samraat Pawar
To better predict how populations and communities respond to climatic temperature variation, it is necessary to understand how the shape of the response of fitness-related rates to temperature evolves (the thermal performance curve). Currently, there is disagreement about the extent to which the evolution of thermal performance curves is constrained. One school of thought has argued for the prevalence of thermodynamic constraints through enzyme kinetics, whereas another argues that adaptation can—at least partly—overcome such constraints....

Experimentally increased brood size accelerates actuarial senescence and increases subsequent reproductive effort in a wild bird population

Jelle Boonekamp, Christina Bauch & Simon Verhulst
1. The assumption that reproductive effort decreases somatic state, accelerating ageing, is central to our understanding of life-history variation. Maximal reproductive effort early in life is predicted to be maladaptive by accelerating ageing disproportionally, decreasing fitness. 2. Optimality theory predicts that reproductive effort is restrained early in life to balance the fitness contribution of reproduction against the survival cost induced by the reproductive effort. When adaptive, the level of reproductive restraint is predicted to be...

Ocean acidification induces distinct transcriptomic responses across life history stages of the sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma

Hannah Devens, Phillip Davidson, Dione Deaker, Kathryn Smith, Maria Byrne & Gregory Wray
Ocean acidification (OA) from seawater uptake of rising carbon dioxide emissions impairs development in marine invertebrates, particularly in calcifying species. Plasticity in gene expression is thought to mediate many of these physiological effects, but how these responses change across life history stages remains unclear. The abbreviated lecithotrophic development of the sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma provides a valuable opportunity to analyze gene expression responses across a wide range of life history stages, including the benthic, post-metamorphic...

A meta-analysis of biological impacts of artificial light at night

Dirk Sanders, Enric Frago, Rachel Kehoe, Christophe Patterson & Kevin Gaston
This is a database of published studies, that measuered how the exposure to artificial light at night impacts the physiology, daily activity patterns and life-history traits. The data were collected using a systematic review with searches in Web of Science and Scopus. We also provide the R-code that was used to analyse the dataset with meta-analytic models in MCMCglmm.

Choice consequences: salinity preferences and hatchling survival in the mangrove rivulus fish (Kryptolebias marmoratus)

Shelly C. McCain, Sydney Kopelic, Thomas M. Houslay, Alastair J. Wilson, Huanda Lu & Ryan L. Earley
In heterogeneous environments, mobile species should occupy habitats in which their fitness is maximized. Mangrove rivulus fish inhabit mangrove ecosystems where salinities range from 0 to 65 ppt, but are most often collected at ∼25 ppt. We examined the salinity preference of mangrove rivulus in a lateral salinity gradient, in the absence of predators and competitors. Fish could swim freely for 8 h throughout the gradient with chambers containing salinities ranging from 5 to 45...

Data from: Network structure and the optimisation of proximity-based association criteria

Ana Cristina Gomes, Neeltje Boogert & Gonçalo Cardoso
Animal social network analysis (SNA) often uses proximity data obtained from automated tracking of individuals. Identifying associations based on proximity requires deciding on quantitative criteria such as the maximum distance or the longest time interval between visits of different individuals to still consider them associated. These quantitative criteria are not easily chosen based on a priori biological arguments alone. Here we propose a procedure for optimising proximity-based association criteria in SNA, whereby different spatial and...

Data from: Small coastal streams – critical reservoirs of genetic diversity for brown trout in the face of increasing anthropogenic stressors

Andrew King, Jamie Stevens & Bruce Stockley
We used microsatellite markers to investigate levels and structuring of genetic diversity in trout (Salmo trutta L.) sampled from 16 rivers along the south coast of Cornwall in southwest England. This region is characterised by many small coastal streams with a few larger catchments. At a regional level, genetic structuring of contemporary populations has been influenced by a combination of events, including the last Ice Age and also more recent human activities over the last...

Consistent measures of oxidative balance predict survival but not reproduction in a long-distance migrant

Thomas Bodey, Ian Cleasby, Jonathan Blount, Graham McElwaine, Freydis Vigfusdottir & Stuart Bearhop
1. Physiological processes, including those that disrupt oxidative balance, have been proposed as key to understanding fundamental life history trade-offs. Yet examination of changes in oxidative balance within wild animals across time, space and major life history challenges remain uncommon. For example, migration presents substantial physiological challenges for individuals, and data on migratory individuals would provide crucial context for exposing the importance of relationships between oxidative balance and fitness outcomes. 2. Here we examined the...

Data from: Contrasting the seasonal and elevational prevalence of generalist avian haemosporidia in co-occurring host species

Josh Lynton-Jenkins & Camille Bonneaud
Understanding the ecology and evolution of parasites is contingent on identifying the selection pressures they face across their infection landscape. Such a task is made challenging by the fact that these pressures will likely vary across time and space, as a result of seasonal and geographical differences in host susceptibility or transmission opportunities. Avian haemosporidian blood parasites are capable of infecting multiple co-occurring hosts within their ranges, yet whether their distribution across time and space...

Data from: Mercury exposure in an endangered seabird: long-term changes and relationships with trophic ecology and breeding success

William Mills, Paco Bustamante, Rona McGill, Orea Anderson, Stuart Bearhop, Yves Cherel, Stephen Votier & Richard Phillips
Mercury (Hg) is an environmental contaminant which, at high concentrations, can negatively influence avian physiology and demography. Albatrosses (Diomedeidae) have higher Hg burdens than all other avian families. Here, we measure total Hg (THg) concentrations of body feathers from adult grey-headed albatrosses (Thalassarche chrysostoma) at South Georgia. Specifically, we: (i) analyse temporal trends at South Georgia (1989–2013) and make comparisons with other breeding populations; (ii) identify factors driving variation in THg concentrations; and, (iii) examine...

Trophic resource partitioning drives fine-scale coexistence in cryptic bat species

Orly Razgour, Roberto Novella-Fernandez, Carlos Ibáñez, Javier Juste, Beth Clare & C. Patrick Doncaster
Understanding the processes that enable species coexistence has important implications for assessing how ecological systems will respond to global change. Morphology and functional similarity increase the potential for competition, and therefore, co-occurring morphologically similar but genetically unique species are a good model system for testing coexistence mechanisms. We used DNA metabarcoding and High Throughput Sequencing to characterise for the first time the trophic ecology of two recently-described cryptic bat species with parapatric ranges, Myotis escalerai...

Evaluating spatially explicit sharing-sparing scenarios for multiple environmental outcomes

Tom Finch, Brett Day, Dario Massimino, John Redhead, Rob Field, Andrew Balmford, Rhys Green & Will Peach
1. Understanding how to allocate land for the sustainable delivery of multiple, competing objectives is a major societal challenge. The land sharing-sparing framework presents a heuristic for understanding the trade-off between food production and biodiversity conservation by comparing region-wide land use scenarios which are equivalent in terms of overall food production. 2. Here, for two contrasting regions of lowland England (The Fens and Salisbury Plain), we use empirical data and predictive models to compare a...

Code for: Threshold assessment, categorical perception, and the evolution of reliable signaling

James Peniston, Patrick Green, Matthew Zipple & Stephen Nowicki
Animals often use assessment signals to communicate information about their quality to a variety of receivers, including potential mates, competitors, and predators. But what maintains reliable signaling and prevents signalers from signaling a better quality than they actually have? Previous work has shown that reliable signaling can be maintained if signalers pay fitness costs for signaling at different intensities and these costs are greater for lower quality individuals than higher quality ones. Models supporting this...

Nonaxisymmetric Stokes Flow Between Concentric Cones

O. Hall, C.P. Hills & A.D. Gilbert

Registration Year

  • 2020
    101

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    96
  • Text
    4
  • Data Paper
    1

Affiliations

  • University of Exeter
    101
  • University of Cambridge
    7
  • University of Leeds
    6
  • Imperial College London
    6
  • University of Oxford
    6
  • Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi
    4
  • Australian National University
    4
  • Duke University
    3
  • University of Edinburgh
    3
  • British Antarctic Survey
    3