111 Works

Data from: Grazed wet meadows are sink habitats for the southern dunlin (Calidris alpina schinzii) due to nest trampling by cattle

Veli-Matti Pakanen, Sami Aikio, Aappo Luukkonen & Kari Koivula
The effect of habitat management is commonly evaluated by measuring population growth, which does not distinguish changes in reproductive success from changes in survival or the effects of immigration or emigration. Management has rarely been evaluated considering complete life cycle of the target organisms, including also possible negative impacts from management. We evaluated the effectiveness of cattle grazing in the restoration of coastal meadows as a breeding habitat for small and medium-sized ground-nesting birds by...

Catchment properties and the photosynthetic trait composition of freshwater plant communities

Lars Lønsmann Iversen, A. Winkel, L. Baastrup-Spohr, A. B. Hinke, J. Alahuhta, A. Baattrup-Pedersen, S. Birk, P. Brodersen, P. A. Chambers, F. Ecke, T. Feldmann, D. Gebler, J. Heino, T. S. Jespersen, S. J. Moe, T. Riis, L. Sass, O. Vestergaard, S. C. Maberly, K. Sand-Jensen & O. Pedersen
Unlike in land plants, photosynthesis in many aquatic plants relies on bicarbonate in addition to carbon dioxide (CO2) to compensate for the low diffusivity and potential depletion of CO2 in water. Concentrations of bicarbonate and CO2 vary greatly with catchment geology. In this study, we investigate whether there is a link between these concentrations and the frequency of freshwater plants possessing the bicarbonate use trait. We show, globally, that the frequency of plant species with...

Data from: From feces to data: a metabarcoding method for analyzing consumed and available prey in a bird-insect food web

Seppo Rytkönen, Eero J. Vesterinen, Coen Westerduin, Tiina Leviäkangas, Emma Vatka, Marko Mutanen, Panu Välimäki, Markku Hukkanen, Marko Suokas & Markku Orell
Diets play a key role in understanding trophic interactions. Knowing the actual structure of food webs contributes greatly to our understanding of biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. The research of prey preferences of different predators requires knowledge not only of the prey consumed, but also of what is available. In this study, we applied DNA metabarcoding to analyze the diet of 4 bird species (willow tits Poecile montanus, Siberian tits Poecile cinctus, great tits Parus major...

Genotype data from: Restoration of transborder connectivity for Fennoscandian brown bears (Ursus arctos)

Alexander Kopatz, Kleven Oddmund, Kojola Ilpo, Aspi Jouni, Anita J. Norman, Göran Spong, Niclas Gyllenstrand, Love Dalén, Ida Fløystad, Snorre B. Hagen, Jonas Kindberg & Øystein Flagstad
Knowledge about the connectivity among natural populations is essential to identify management units for effective conservation actions. Conservation-minded management has led to the recovery of large carnivore populations in northern Europe, possibly restoring connectivity between the two separated, but expanding brown bear (Ursus arctos) populations on the Scandinavian peninsula to the west and Karelia, a part of the large Eurasian population, to the east. The degree of connectivity between these populations has been poorly understood,...

Dynamics of a host-parasitoid interaction clarified by modelling and DNA sequencing

Marko Mutanen, Otso Ovaskainen, Gergely Várkonyi, Juhani Itämies, Sean W. J. Prosser, Paul D. N. Hebert & Ilkka Hanski
It has been hypothesized that the 2-year oscillations in abundance of Xestia moths are mediated by interactions with 1-year Ophion parasitoid wasps. We tested this hypothesis by modelling a 35-year time series of Xestia and Ophion from northern Finland. Additionally, we used DNA barcoding to ascertain the species diversity of Ophion and targeted amplicon sequencing of their gut contents to confirm their larval hosts. Modelling of the time-series data strongly supported the hypothesized host–parasitoid dynamics...

Using genomic information for management planning of an endangered perennial, Viola uliginosa

Kyung Min Lee, Pertti Ranta, Jarmo Saarikivi, Lado Kutnar, Branko Vreš, Maxim Dzhus, Marko Mutanen & Laura Kvist
Species occupying habitats subjected to frequent natural and/or anthropogenic changes are a challenge for conservation management. We studied one such species, Viola uliginosa, an endangered perennial wetland species typically inhabiting sporadically flooded meadows alongside rivers/lakes. In order to estimate genomic diversity, population structure and history, we sampled five sites in Finland, three in Estonia, and one each in Slovenia, Belarus, and Poland using genomic SNP data with double-digest restriction site associated DNA sequencing (ddRAD-seq). We...

Costly mating delays drive female ornamentation in a capital breeder full dataset

Juhani Hopkins, Gautier Baudry, Topi K. Lehtonen & Arja Kaitala
The data is related to experiments on glow-worms (L. noctiluca), where we studied the effect of stressing and mating delays on signalling effort.We address how fecundity might be traded off with mate attraction and other aspects of reproduction in females remains poorly understood. We investigated these allocation trade-offs using the common glow-worm (Lampyris noctiluca), a lampyrid beetle in which flightless, sedentary females only use resources gathered during the larval stage to attract flying males by...

Genetic divergence, admixture and subspecific boundaries in a peripheral population of great tit, Parus major (Aves, Paridae)

Sahar Javaheri Tehrani, Laura Kvist, Omid Mirshamsi, Seyed Mahmoud Ghasempouri & Mansour Aliabadian
Secondary contact zones have been formed between several pairs of avian species and subspecies in northern and northeastern Iran during the post-Pleistocene and Holocene times. Three subspecies groups out of the four in the great tit (Parus major), namely, major, bokharensis and cinereus are supposed to have come into local or regional secondary contact in northeastern Iran. Parus major intermedius known from this region, has long been suggested to have a hybrid origin, stemming from...

Data from: Dispersal in a house sparrow metapopulation: an integrative case study of genetic assignment calibrated with ecological data and pedigree information

Dilan Saatoglu, Alina K. Niskanen, Markku Kuismin, Peter S. Ranke, Ingerid J. Hagen, Yimen G. Araya-Ajoy, Thomas Kvalnes, Henrik Pärn, Bernt Rønning, Thor Harald Ringsby, Bernt-Erik Sæther, Arild Husby, Mikko J. Sillanpää & Henrik Jensen
Dispersal has a crucial role determining eco-evolutionary dynamics through both gene flow and population size regulation. However, to study dispersal and its consequences, one must distinguish immigrants from residents. Dispersers can be identified using telemetry, capture-mark-recapture (CMR) methods, or genetic assignment methods. All of these methods have disadvantages, such as, high costs and substantial field efforts needed for telemetry and CMR surveys, and adequate genetic distance required in genetic assignment. In this study, we used...

Data from: Testing macroecological abundance patterns: the relationship between local abundance and range size, range position and climatic suitability among European vascular plants

Maria Sporbert, Petr Keil, Gunnar Seidler, Helge Bruelheide, Ute Jandt, Svetlana Aćić, Idoia Biurrun, Juan Antonio Campos, Andraž Čarni, Milan Chytrý, Renata Custerevska, Jürgen Dengler, Valentin Golub, Florian Jansen, Anna Kuzemko, Jonathan Lenoir, Corrado Marcenò, Jesper Erenskjold Moeslund, Aaron Pérez-Haase, Solvita Rūsiņa, Urban Šilc, Ioannis Tsiripidis, Vigdis Vandvik, Kiril Vassilev, Risto Virtanen … & Erik Welk
Aim: A fundamental question in macroecology centres around understanding the relationship between species’ local abundance and their distribution in geographic and climatic space (i.e. the multi-dimensional climatic space or climatic niche). Here, we tested three macroecological hypotheses that link local abundance to the following range properties: (1) the abundance-range size relationship, (2) the abundance-range centre relationship, and (3) the abundance-suitability relationship. Location: Europe Taxon: Vascular plants Methods: Distribution range maps were extracted from the Chorological...

Data from: Outcome of assisted reproductive technology (ART) and subsequent self-reported life satisfaction

Paula Kuivasaari-Pirinen, Heli Koivumaa-Honkanen, Maritta Hippeläinen, Kaisa Raatikainen & Seppo Heinonen
Objective: To compare life satisfaction between women with successful or unsuccessful outcome after assisted reproductive treatment (ART) by taking into account the time since the last ART. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Tertiary hospital. Patients: A total of 987 consecutive women who had undergone ART during 1996–2007 were invited and altogether 505 women participated in the study. Interventions: A postal enquiry with a life satisfaction scale. Main Outcome Measure: Self-reported life satisfaction in respect to the...

Data from: Environmental perturbation, grazing pressure and soil wetness jointly drive mountain tundra toward divergent alternative states

Patrick Saccone, Tuija Pyykkonen, Anu Eskelinen & Risto Virtanen
1. Plant communities are structured by complex interactions between multiple factors, which veil our understanding of the effects of environmental changes on communities and ecosystems. Besides the relative role of biotic and abiotic factors as community-structuring processes, addressing how they jointly affect the ecological resilience and resistance of plant communities is crucial to understand better the long-term response of communities facing global changes. 2. Here, we used the results from a long-term (23 years) perturbation...

Data from: Predator–vole interactions in northern Europe: the role of small mustelids revised

Katri Korpela, Pekka Helle, Heikki Henttonen, Erkki Korpimäki, Esa Koskela, Otso Ovaskainen, Hannu Pietiäinen, Janne Sundell, Jari Valkama, Otso Huitu, H. Pietiainen & E. Korpimaki
The cyclic population dynamics of vole and predator communities is a key phenomenon in northern ecosystems, and it appears to be influenced by climate change. Reports of collapsing rodent cycles have attributed the changes to warmer winters, which weaken the interaction between voles and their specialist subnivean predators. Using population data collected throughout Finland during 1986–2011, we analyse the spatio-temporal variation in the interactions between populations of voles and specialist, generalist and avian predators, and...

Data from: Reliable wolf-dog hybrid detection in Europe using a reduced SNP panel developed for non-invasively collected samples

Jenni Harmoinen, Alina Von Thaden, Jouni Aspi, Laura Kvist, Berardino Cocchiararo, Anne Jarausch, Andrea Gazzola, Teodora Sin, Hannes Lohi, Marjo Hytönen, Ilpo Kojola, Astrid Vik Stronen, Romolo Caniglia, Federica Mattucci, Marco Galaverni, Raquel Godinho, Aritz Ruiz-González, Ettore Randi, Violeta Muñoz-Fuentes & Carsten Nowak
Background: Understanding the processes that lead to hybridization of wolves and dogs is of scientific and management importance, particularly over large geographical scales, as wolves can disperse great distances. However, a method to efficiently detect hybrids in routine wolf monitoring is lacking. Microsatellites offer only limited resolution due to the low number of markers showing distinctive allele frequencies between wolves and dogs. Moreover, calibration across laboratories is time-consuming and costly. In this study, we selected...

MOBIO

Chris McCool, Sébastien Marcel, Abdenour Hadid, Matti Pietikainen, Pavel Matejka, Jan Cernocky, Norman Poh, Josef Kittler, Anthony Larcher, Lévy Christophe, Driss Matrouf, jean-francois Bonastre, Phil Tresadern & Timothy Cootes
MOBIO is a dataset for mobile face and speaker recognition. The dataset consists of bi-modal (audio and video) data taken from 152 people. The dataset has a female-male ratio of nearly 1:2 (100 males and 52 females) and was collected from August 2008 until July 2010 in six different sites from five different countries. This led to a diverse bi-modal dataset with both native and non-native English speakers.

Genetic assignment of individuals to source populations using network estimation tools

Markku Kuismin, Dilan Saatoglu, Alina Niskanen, Henrik Jensen & Mikko Sillanpää
Dispersal, the movement of individuals between populations, is crucial in many ecological and genetic processes. However, direct identification of dispersing individuals is difficult or impossible in natural populations. By using genetic assignment methods, individuals with unknown genetic origin can be assigned to source populations. This knowledge is necessary in studying many key questions in ecology, evolution and conservation. We introduce a network-based tool BONE (Baseline Oriented Network Estimation) for genetic population assignment, which borrows concepts...

Data from: Consistent scaling of inbreeding depression in space and time in a house sparrow metapopulation

Alina K. Niskanen, Anna M. Billing, Håkon Holand, Ingerid J. Hagen, Yimen G. Araya-Ajoy, Arild Husby, Bernt Rønning, Ane Marlene Myhre, Peter Sjolte Ranke, Thomas Kvalnes, Henrik Pärn, Thor Harald Ringsby, Sigbjørn Lien, Bernt-Erik Sæther, Stefanie Muff & Henrik Jensen
Inbreeding may increase the extinction risk of small populations. Yet, studies using modern genomic tools to investigate inbreeding depression in nature have been limited to single populations, and little is known about the dynamics of inbreeding depression in subdivided populations over time. Natural populations often experience different environmental conditions and differ in demographic history and genetic composition; characteristics that can affect the severity of inbreeding depression. We utilised extensive long-term data on more than 3100...

Data for: Phytochemical shift from condensed tannins to flavonoids in transgenic Betula pendula decreases consumption and growth but improves growth efficiency of Epirrita autumnata larvae

Paula Thitz, Lauri Mehtätalo, Panu Välimäki, Tendry Randriamanana, Mika Lännenpää, Ann E. Hagerman, Tommi Andersson, Riitta Julkunen-Tiitto & Tommi Nyman
Despite active research, antiherbivore activity of specific plant phenolics remains largely unresolved. We constructed silver birch (Betula pendula) lines with modified phenolic metabolism to study the effects of foliar flavonoids and condensed tannins on consumption and growth of larvae of a generalist herbivore, the autumnal moth (Epirrita autumnata). We conducted a feeding experiment using birch lines in which expression of dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR), anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) or anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) had been decreased by RNA...

A genome-wide linkage map for the house sparrow (Passer domesticus) provides insights into the evolutionary history of the avian genome

Ingerid Hagen, Sigbjørn Lien, Anna Billing, Tore O. Elgvin, Cassandra Trier, Alina K. Niskanen, Maja Tarka, Jon Slate, Glenn-Peter Sætre & Henrik Jensen
The house sparrow is an important model species for studying physiological, ecological and evolutionary processes in wild populations. Here, we present a medium density, genome wide linkage map for house sparrow (Passer domesticus) that has aided the assembly of the house sparrow reference genome, and that will provide an important resource for ongoing mapping of genes controlling important traits in the ecology and evolution of this species. Using a custom house sparrow 10K iSelect Illumina...

Data from: Human disturbance increases functional but not structural variability of stream fungal communities

Mikko Tolkkinen, Heikki Mykrä, Annamari M. Markkola & Timo Muotka
Temporal stability of ecosystem functions is often regulated by the same environmental factors that also shape diversity. Therefore, species diversity, ecosystem functions and their environmental regulators should be considered together to understand and predict the consequences of anthropogenic disturbances on ecosystems. We studied the influence of land-use disturbance (agriculture) and a natural stressor (low pH due to specific geology) on the temporal variability (variability among successive years) of fungal decomposer communities and leaf decomposition rates...

Data from: Effects of ambient temperatures on evolutionary potential of reproductive timing in boreal passerines

Emma Vatka, Markku Orell, Seppo Rytkönen & Juha Merilä
1. Many populations need to adapt to changing environmental conditions, such as warming climate. Changing conditions generate directional selection for traits critical for fitness. For evolutionary responses to occur, these traits need to be heritable. However, changes in environmental conditions can alter the amount of heritable variation a population expresses, making predictions about expected responses difficult. 2. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of ambient temperatures on evolutionary potential and strength...

Data from: Herbivory mediates the long-term shifts in the relative importance of microsite and propagule limitation

Anu Eskelinen, Patrick Saccone, Marko J. Spasojevic & Risto Virtanen
Microsite and propagule limitation are predicted to jointly influence plant community assembly and diversity, with shifts in their relative contributions under different ecological conditions. Mammalian herbivory can also exhibit strong impact on community assembly and diversity. However, to date few studies have considered how herbivory might interact with propagule and microsite limitation and how herbivory might alter their relative importance. Even fewer studies have examined how these processes manifest over time to influence community assembly....

Data from: Comparing the responses of bryophytes and short-statured vascular plants to climate shifts and eutrophication

Risto Virtanen, Anu Eskelinen & Susan Harrison
Few experimental studies have tested how abundance and diversity of grassland bryophytes respond to global environmental changes such as climate shifts and eutrophication. Because bryophytes in grasslands are low-statured, and because plant height is a key functional trait governing plant responses to resource gradients, their responses to these factors could resemble those of better-studied small vascular plants. Alternatively, traits unique to bryophytes could lead to qualitatively different responses than those of small vascular plants. In...

Data from: Elucidating mechanisms for insect body size: partial support for the oxygen-dependent induction of moulting hypothesis

Sami Mikael Kivelä, Sonja Viinamäki, Netta Keret, Karl Gotthard, Esa Hohtola & Panu Välimäki
Body size is a key life history trait and knowledge of its mechanistic basis is crucial in life history biology. Such knowledge is accumulating in holometabolous insects, whose growth is characterised and body size affected by moulting. According to the oxygen-dependent induction of moulting (ODIM) hypothesis, moult is induced at a critical mass where oxygen demand of growing tissues overrides the supply that principally grows only at moults. Support for the ODIM hypothesis is controversial...

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