11 Works

Data from: Cuckoo parasitism in a cavity nesting host: near absent egg-rejection in a northern redstart population under heavy apparent (but low effective) brood parasitism

Robert L. Thomson, Jere Tolvanen & Jukka T. Forsman
Brood parasite - host systems continue to offer insights into species coevolution. A notable system is the redstart Phoenicurus phoenicurus parasitized by the “redstart-cuckoo” Cuculus canorus gens. Redstarts are the only regular cuckoo hosts that breed in cavities, which challenges adult cuckoos in egg laying and cuckoo chicks in host eviction. We investigated parasitism in this system and found high overall parasitism rates (31.1% of 360 redstart nests), but also that only 33.1% of parasitism...

Data from: Selection for population specific adaptation has shaped patterns of variation in the photoperiod pathway genes in Arabidopsis lyrata during post glacial colonization

Tiina M. Mattila, Esa A. Aalto, Tuomas Toivainen, Anne Niittyvuopio, Susanna Piltonen, Helmi Kuittinen & Outi Savolainen
Spatially varying selection can lead to population-specific adaptation, which is often recognized at the phenotypic level; however, the genetic evidence is weaker in many groups of organisms. In plants, environmental shifts that occur due to colonization of a novel environment may require adaptive changes in the timing of growth and flowering, which are often governed by location-specific environmental cues such as day length. We studied locally varying selection in 19 flowering time loci in nine...

Data from: Climatic effects on planning behavior

Yong Liu, Vassilis Kostakos & Hongxiu Li
What mechanism links climate change and social change? Palaeoanthropological analysis of human remains suggests that abrupt climate change is linked to societal restructuring, but it has been challenging to reliably identify the exact mechanisms underlying this relationship. Here we identify one potential mechanism that can link climate to behavior change, and underpins many of the reported findings on social restructuring. Specifically, we show that daily weather is linked to human planning behavior, and this effect...

Data from: Genome-wide evidence reveals that African and Eurasian Golden Jackals are distinct species

Klaus-Peter Koepfli, John Pollinger, Raquel Godinho, Jacqueline Robinson, Amanda Lea, Sarah Hendricks, Rena M. Schweizer, Olaf Thalmann, Pedro Silva, Zhenxin Fan, Andrey A. Yurchenko, Pavel Dobrynin, Alexey Makunin, James A. Cahill, Beth Shapiro, Francisco Álvares, José C. Brito, Eli Geffen, Jennifer A. Leonard, Kristofer M. Helgen, Warren E. Johnson, Stephen J. O'Brien, Blaire Van Valkenburgh & Robert K. Wayne
The golden jackal of Africa (Canis aureus) has long been considered a conspecific of jackals distributed throughout Eurasia, with the nearest source populations in the Middle East. However, two recent reports found that mitochondrial haplotypes of some African golden jackals aligned more closely to gray wolves (Canis lupus), which is surprising given the absence of gray wolves in Africa and the phenotypic divergence between the two species. Moreover, these results imply the existence of a...

Data from: I’m sexy and I glow it: female ornamentation in a nocturnal capital breeder

Juhani Hopkins, Gautier Baudry, Ulrika Candolin & Arja Kaitala
In many species, males rely on sexual ornaments to attract females. Females, by contrast, rarely produce ornaments. The glow-worm (Lampyris noctiluca) is an exception where wingless females glow to attract males that fly in search of females. However, little is known about the factors that promote the evolution of female ornaments in a sexual selection context. Here, we investigated if the female ornament of the glow-worm is a signal of fecundity used in male mate...

Data from: Extrapolating multi-decadal plant community changes based on medium-term experiments can be risky: evidence from high-latitude tundra

Patrick Saccone & Risto Virtanen
For most experimental studies the short-term responses to manipulation often differ from the long-term changes in the community composition, dynamics or functioning. Such discrepancy limits the translation of experimental results into key ecological topics such as global environmental change. Here we analyzed plant community dynamics from a 23-year transplant experiment in the Fennoscandian mountain tundra and explored how well the pattern of responses over the first 12 years of the experiment can predict longer-term changes....

Data from: Y chromosome haplotype distribution of brown bears (Ursus arctos) in Northern Europe provides insight into population history and recovery (Ursus arctos)

Julia Schregel, Hans Geir Eiken, Finn Audun Grøndahl, Frank Hailer, Jouni Aspi, Ilpo Kojola, Konstantin Tirronen, Pjotr Danilov, Alexander Rykov, Eugene Poroshin, Axel Janke, Jon E. Swenson, Snorre B. Hagen & Piotr Danilov
High-resolution, male-inherited Y-chromosomal markers are a useful tool for population genetic analyses of wildlife species, but to date have only been applied in this context to relatively few species besides humans. Using nine Y-chromosomal STR and three Y-chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphism markers (Y-SNPs), we studied whether male gene flow was important for the recent recovery of the brown bear (Ursus arctos) in Northern Europe, where the species declined dramatically in numbers and geographic distribution during...

Data from: Human disturbance increases functional but not structural variability of stream fungal communities

Mikko Tolkkinen, Heikki Mykrä, Annamari M. Markkola & Timo Muotka
Temporal stability of ecosystem functions is often regulated by the same environmental factors that also shape diversity. Therefore, species diversity, ecosystem functions and their environmental regulators should be considered together to understand and predict the consequences of anthropogenic disturbances on ecosystems. We studied the influence of land-use disturbance (agriculture) and a natural stressor (low pH due to specific geology) on the temporal variability (variability among successive years) of fungal decomposer communities and leaf decomposition rates...

Data from: Thermal plasticity of growth and development varies adaptively among alternative developmental pathways

Sami Mikael Kivelä, Beatrice Svensson, Alma Tiwe & Karl Gotthard
Polyphenism, the expression of discrete alternative phenotypes, is often a consequence of a developmental switch. Physiological changes induced by a developmental switch potentially affect reaction norms, but the evolution and existence of alternative reaction norms remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that, in the butterfly Pieris napi (Lepidoptera: Pieridae), thermal reaction norms of several life history traits vary adaptively among switch-induced alternative developmental pathways of diapause and direct development. The switch was affected both by...

Data from: Disentangling the complex evolutionary history of the Western Palearctic blue tits (Cyanistes spp.) – phylogenomic analyses suggest radiation by multiple colonisation events and subsequent isolation

Martin Stervander, Juan Carlos Illera, Laura Kvist, Pedro Barbosa, Naomi P. Keehnen, Peter Pruisscher, Staffan Bensch & Bengt Hansson
Isolated islands and their often unique biota continue to play key roles for understanding the importance of drift, genetic variation and adaptation in the process of population differentiation and speciation. One island system that has inspired and intrigued evolutionary biologists is the blue tit complex (Cyanistes spp.) in Europe and Africa, in particular the complex evolutionary history of the multiple genetically distinct taxa of the Canary Islands. Understanding Afrocanarian colonization events is of particular importance...

Data from: Inferring the effects of potential dispersal routes on the metacommunity structure of stream insects: as the crow flies, as the fish swims or as the fox runs?

Olli-Matti Kärnä, Mira Grönroos, Harri Antikainen, Jan Hjort, Jari Ilmonen, Lauri Paasivirta & Jani Heino
1. Metacommunity research relies largely on proxies for inferring the effect of dispersal on local community structure. Overland and watercourse distances have been typically used as such proxies. A good proxy for dispersal should, however, take into account more complex landscape features that can affect an organism's movement and dispersal. The cost distance approach does just that, allowing determining the path of least resistance across a landscape. 2. Here, we examined the distance decay of...

Registration Year

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Affiliations

  • University of Oulu
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  • University of Turku
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  • Finnish Environment Institute
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  • Institute of Biology
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  • University of California System
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  • Duke University
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  • Sichuan University
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  • Lund University
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  • Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre
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  • Smithsonian Institution
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