9 Works

Data from: Sex allocation conflict between queens and workers in Formica pratensis wood ants predicts seasonal sex ratio variation

Heikki Helanterä, Jonna Kulmuni & Pekka Pamilo
Sex allocation theory predicts parents should adjust their investment in male and female offspring in a way that increases parental fitness. This has been shown in several species and selective contexts. Yet, seasonal sex ratio variation within species and its underlying causes are poorly understood. Here we study sex allocation variation in the wood ant Formica pratensis. This species displays conflict over colony sex ratio as workers and queens prefer different investment in male and...

Data from: Natural and anthropogenic influences on the population structure of white-tailed eagles in the Carpathian Basin and Central Europe

Edina Nemesházi, Szilvia Kövér, Frank E. Zachos, Zoltán Horváth, Gábor Tihanyi, Attila Mórocz, Tibor Mikuska, István Hám, Ivan Literák, Suvi Ponnikas, Tadeusz Mizera & Krisztián Szabó
European populations of the white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) suffered a drastic decline during the 20th century. In many countries, only a few dozen breeding pairs survived or the species disappeared completely. By today, the populations have recovered, naturally or through restocking (e.g. in Scotland or the Czech Republic). In the Carpathian Basin, which is now a stronghold in southern Europe for the species in the southern part of the distribution range with more than 500...

Data from: Genetic heterogeneity underlying variation in a locally adaptive clinal trait in Pinus sylvestris revealed by a Bayesian multipopulation analysis

Sonja T. Kujala, Timo Knürr, Katri Kärkkäinen, David B. Neale, Mikko J. Sillanpää & Outi Savolainen
Local adaptation is a common feature of plant and animal populations. Adaptive phenotypic traits are genetically differentiated along environmental gradients, but the genetic basis of such adaptation is still poorly known. Genetic association studies of local adaptation combine data over populations. Correcting for population structure in these studies can be problematic since both selection and neutral demographic events can create similar allele frequency differences between populations. Correcting for demography with traditional methods may lead to...

Data from: A comparative analysis reveals little evidence for niche conservatism in aquatic macrophytes among four areas on two continents

Janne Alahuhta, Frauke Ecke, Lucinda B. Johnson, Laura Sass & Jani Heino
One of the most intriguing questions in current ecology is the extent to which the ecological niches of species are conserved in space and time. Niche conservatism has mostly been studied using coarse-scale data of species' distributions, although it is at the local habitat scales where species' responses to ecological variables primarily take place. We investigated the extent to which niches of aquatic macrophytes are conserved among four study regions (i.e. Finland, Sweden and the...

Data from: Different ultimate factors define timing of breeding in two related species

Veli-Matti Pakanen, Markku Orell, Emma Vatka, Seppo Rytkönen & Juli Broggi
Correct reproductive timing is crucial for fitness. Breeding phenology even in similar species can differ due to different selective pressures on the timing of reproduction. These selection pressures define species’ responses to warming springs. The temporal match-mismatch hypothesis suggests that timing of breeding in animals is selected to match with food availability (synchrony). Alternatively, time-dependent breeding success (the date hypothesis) can result from other seasonally deteriorating ecological conditions such as intra- or interspecific competition or...

Data from: Sediments and flow have mainly independent effects on multitrophic stream communities and ecosystem functions

Kaisa-Riikka Mustonen, Heikki Mykrä, Pauliina Louhi, Annamari Markkola, Mikko Tolkkinen, Ari Huusko, Nico Alioravainen, Sirkku Mäkinen, Timo Muotka & Sirkku Lehtinen
Stream ecosystems are affected by multiple abiotic stressors, and species responses to simultaneous stressors may differ from those predicted based on single-stressor responses. Using 12 semi-natural stream channels, we examined the individual and interactive effects of flow level (low or high flow) and addition of fine sediments (grain size < 2mm) on key ecosystem processes (leaf breakdown, algal biomass accrual) and benthic macroinvertebrate and fungal communities. Both stressors had mostly independent effects on biological responses,...

Data from: Grazed wet meadows are sink habitats for the southern dunlin (Calidris alpina schinzii) due to nest trampling by cattle

Veli-Matti Pakanen, Sami Aikio, Aappo Luukkonen & Kari Koivula
The effect of habitat management is commonly evaluated by measuring population growth, which does not distinguish changes in reproductive success from changes in survival or the effects of immigration or emigration. Management has rarely been evaluated considering complete life cycle of the target organisms, including also possible negative impacts from management. We evaluated the effectiveness of cattle grazing in the restoration of coastal meadows as a breeding habitat for small and medium-sized ground-nesting birds by...

Data from: Herbivory mediates the long-term shifts in the relative importance of microsite and propagule limitation

Anu Eskelinen, Patrick Saccone, Marko J. Spasojevic & Risto Virtanen
Microsite and propagule limitation are predicted to jointly influence plant community assembly and diversity, with shifts in their relative contributions under different ecological conditions. Mammalian herbivory can also exhibit strong impact on community assembly and diversity. However, to date few studies have considered how herbivory might interact with propagule and microsite limitation and how herbivory might alter their relative importance. Even fewer studies have examined how these processes manifest over time to influence community assembly....

Data from: Comparing the responses of bryophytes and short-statured vascular plants to climate shifts and eutrophication

Risto Virtanen, Anu Eskelinen & Susan Harrison
Few experimental studies have tested how abundance and diversity of grassland bryophytes respond to global environmental changes such as climate shifts and eutrophication. Because bryophytes in grasslands are low-statured, and because plant height is a key functional trait governing plant responses to resource gradients, their responses to these factors could resemble those of better-studied small vascular plants. Alternatively, traits unique to bryophytes could lead to qualitatively different responses than those of small vascular plants. In...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • University of Oulu
    9
  • University of Helsinki
    3
  • Finnish Environment Institute
    2
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    2
  • Natural Resources Institute Finland
    2
  • University of California System
    1
  • Szent István University
    1
  • University of Minnesota
    1
  • Naturhistorisches Museum
    1
  • University of Colorado Boulder
    1