12 Works

Data from: Genome-wide meta-analysis of sciatica in Finnish population

Susanna Lemmelä, Svetlana Solovieva, Rahman Shiri, Christian Benner, Markku Heliövaara, Johannes Kettunen, Verneri Anttila, Samuli Ripatti, Markus Perola, Ilkka Seppälä, Markus Juonala, Mika Kähönen, Veikko Salomaa, Jorma Viikari, Olli Raitakari, Terho Lehtimäki, Aarno Palotie, Eira Viikari-Juntula, Kirsti Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Olli T. Raitakari & Eira Viikari-Juntura
Sciatica or the sciatic syndrome is a common and often disabling low back disorder in the working-age population. It has a relatively high heritability but poorly understood molecular mechanisms. The Finnish population is a genetic isolate where small founder population and bottleneck events have led to enrichment of certain rare and low frequency variants. We performed here the first genome-wide association (GWAS) and meta-analysis of sciatica. The meta-analysis was conducted across two GWAS covering 291...

Data from: Widespread hybridization within mound-building wood ants in Southern Finland results in cytonuclear mismatches and potential for sex-specific hybrid breakdown

Jack Beresford, Marianne Elias, Lucy Pluckrose, Liselotte Sundström, Roger K. Butlin, Pekka Pamilo & Jonna Kulmuni
Hybridization and gene flow between diverging lineages is increasingly recognized as a common evolutionary process and its consequences can vary from hybrid breakdown to adaptive introgression. We have previously found a population of wood ant hybrids between Formica aquilonia and F. polyctena that shows antagonistic effects of hybridization: females with introgressed alleles show hybrid vigour, whereas males with the same alleles show hybrid breakdown. Here we investigate whether hybridization is a general phenomenon in this...

Data from: Pulsed food resources, but not forest cover, determines lifetime reproductive success in a forest-dwelling rodent

Katrine S. Hoset, Alexandre Villers, Ralf Wistbacka & Vesa Selonen
1. The relative contributions of habitat and food availability on fitness may provide evidence for key habitat features needed to safeguard population persistence. However, defining habitat quality for a species can be a complex task, especially if knowledge on the relationship between individual performance and habitat quality is lacking. 2. Here, we determined the relative importance of availability of suitable forest habitat, body mass, and food from masting tree species on female lifetime reproductive success...

Data from: Habitat connectivity and in-stream vegetation control temporal variability of benthic invertebrate communities

Kaisa-Leena Huttunen, Heikki Mykrä, Jari Oksanen, Anna Astorga, Riku Paavola & Timo Muotka
One of the key challenges to understanding patterns of β diversity is to disentangle deterministic patterns from stochastic ones. Stochastic processes may mask the influence of deterministic factors on community dynamics, hindering identification of the mechanisms causing variation in community composition. We studied temporal β diversity (among-year dissimilarity) of macroinvertebrate communities in near-pristine boreal streams across 14 years. To assess whether the observed β diversity deviates from that expected by chance, and to identify processes...

Data from: Role of seed germination in adaptation and reproductive isolation in Arabidopsis lyrata

Tuomas Hämälä, Tiina M. Mattila, Päivi H. Leinonen, Helmi Kuittinen & Outi Savolainen
Seed germination is an important developmental and life history stage. Yet, the evolutionary impact of germination has mainly been studied in the context of dormancy, or for its role in reproductive isolation between species. Here, we aim to examine multiple consequences of genetic divergence on germination traits between two Arabidopsis lyrata subspecies: ssp. petraea (Eurasia) and ssp. lyrata (North-America). Post-dormancy germination time, a potentially adaptive trait, showed differentiation between the populations, and quantitative trait loci...

Data from: Differential responses by stream and riparian biodiversity to in-stream restoration of forestry-impacted streams

Jarno Turunen, Jukka Aroviita, Hannu Marttila, Pauliina Louhi, Tiina Laamanen, Mikko Tolkkinen, Pirkko-Liisa Luhta, Bjørn Kløve & Timo Muotka
1. Forestry can have detrimental impacts on stream ecosystems, particularly via excessive sedimentation. A key challenge to stream management is therefore to identify the best restoration practices to mitigate the harmful impacts of fine sediments on stream biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. 2. We studied the effects of restoration of sediment-impacted headwater streams on the habitat structure, hydrologic retention, biodiversity (microbes, bryophytes, benthic macroinvertebrates, riparian plants) and ecosystem functions (periphyton accrual rate and leaf breakdown) by...

Data from: Genetic substructure and admixture as important factors in linkage disequilibrium-based estimation of effective number of breeders in recovering wildlife populations

Alexander Kopatz, Hans Geir Eiken, Julia Schregel, Jouni Aspi, Ilpo Kojola & Snorre B. Hagen
The number of effective breeders (Nb) and effective population size (Ne) are population parameters reflective of evolutionary potential, susceptibility to stochasticity, and viability. We have estimated these parameters using the linkage disequilibrium-based approach with LDNE through the latest phase of population recovery of the brown bears (Ursus arctos) in Finland (1993–2010; N = 621). This phase of the recovery was recently documented to be associated with major changes in genetic composition. In particular, differentiation between...

Data from: Elucidating mechanisms for insect body size: partial support for the oxygen-dependent induction of moulting hypothesis

Sami Mikael Kivelä, Sonja Viinamäki, Netta Keret, Karl Gotthard, Esa Hohtola & Panu Välimäki
Body size is a key life history trait and knowledge of its mechanistic basis is crucial in life history biology. Such knowledge is accumulating in holometabolous insects, whose growth is characterised and body size affected by moulting. According to the oxygen-dependent induction of moulting (ODIM) hypothesis, moult is induced at a critical mass where oxygen demand of growing tissues overrides the supply that principally grows only at moults. Support for the ODIM hypothesis is controversial...

Data from: Consequences of grazer-induced vegetation transitions on ecosystem carbon storage in the tundra

Henni Ylänne, Johan Olofsson, Lauri Oksanen & Sari Stark
1. Large herbivores can control plant community composition and, under certain conditions, even induce vegetation shifts to alternative ecosystem states. As different plant assemblages maintain contrasting carbon (C) cycling patterns, herbivores have the potential to alter C sequestration at regional scales. Their influence is of particular interest in the Arctic tundra, where a large share of the world’s soil C reservoir is stored. 2. We analysed how grazing mammals influence tundra vegetation and how grazer-induced...

Data from: Fine-scale population genetic structure of the Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) in a human-dominated western Terai Arc Landscape, India

Sujeet Kumar Singh, Jouni Aspi, Laura Kvist, Reeta Sharma, Puneet Pandey, Sudhanshu Mishra, Randeep Singh, Manoj Agrawal & Surendra Prakash Goyal
Despite massive global conservation strategies, tiger populations continued to decline until recently, mainly due to habitat loss, human-animal conflicts, and poaching. These factors are known to affect the genetic characteristics of tiger populations and decrease local effective population sizes. The Terai Arc Landscape (TAL) at the foothills of the Himalaya is one of the 42 source sites of tigers around the globe. Therefore, information on how landscape features and anthropogenic factors affect the fine-scale spatial...

Data from: Non-invasive genetic monitoring involving citizen science enables reconstruction of current pack dynamics in a re-establishing wolf population

Hanna Granroth-Wilding, Craig Primmer, Meri Lindqvist, Jenni Poutanen, Olaf Thalmann, Jouni Aspi, Jenni Harmoinen, Ilpo Kojola & Toni Laaksonen
Background: Carnivores are re-establishing in many human-populated areas, where their presence is often contentious. Reaching consensus over management decisions is often hampered by a dispute about the size of the local carnivore population. Understanding the reproductive dynamics and individual movements of the carnivores can provide support for management decisions, but individual-level information can be difficult to obtain from elusive, wide-ranging species. Non-invasive genetic sampling can yield such information, but makes subsequent reconstruction of population history...

Data from: Stabilising selection on microsatellite allele length at arginine vasopressin 1a receptor and oxytocin receptor loci

Phillip C. Watts, Eva R. Kallio, Esa Koskela, Eija Lonn, Tapio Mappes & Mikael Mokkonen
The loci arginine vasopressin receptor 1a (avpr1a) and oxytocin receptor (oxtr) have evolutionarily conserved roles in vertebrate social and sexual behavior. Allelic variation at a microsatellite locus in the 5’ regulatory region of these genes is associated with fitness in the bank vole Myodes glareolus. Given the low frequency of long and short alleles at these microsatellite loci in wild bank voles, we used breeding trials to determine whether selection acts against long and short...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • University of Oulu
    12
  • University of Turku
    4
  • Finnish Environment Institute
    2
  • University of Tartu
    2
  • University of Helsinki
    2
  • University of Eastern Finland
    1
  • The Arctic University of Norway
    1
  • University of Gothenburg
    1
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    1
  • Wellcome Trust
    1