13 Works

Data from: Statistical forecasting of current and future circum-Arctic ground temperatures and active layer thickness

Juha Aalto, Olli Karjalainen, Jan Hjort & Miska Luoto
Mean annual ground temperature (MAGT) and active layer thickness (ALT) are key to understanding the evolution of the ground thermal state across the Arctic under climate change. Here a statistical modeling approach is presented to forecast current and future circum-Arctic MAGT and ALT in relation to climatic and local environmental factors, at spatial scales unreachable with contemporary transient modeling. After deploying an ensemble of multiple statistical techniques, distance-blocked cross-validation between observations and predictions suggested excellent...

Data from: Short- and mid-wavelength artificial light influences the flash signals of Aquatica ficta fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae)

Avalon C.S. Owens, Victor B. Meyer-Rochow, En-Cheng Yang & Avalon Celeste Stevahn Owens
Urbanization can radically disrupt natural ecosystems through alteration of the sensory environment. Habitat disturbances are predicted to favor behaviorally flexible species capable of adapting to altered environments. When artificial light at night (ALAN) is introduced into urban areas, it has the potential to impede reproduction of local firefly populations by obscuring their bioluminescent courtship signals. Whether individual fireflies can brighten their signals to maintain visibility against an illuminated background remains unknown. In this study, we...

Data from: Pale by comparison: competitive interactions between signalling female glow-worms

Anna-Maria Borshagovski, Gautier Baudry, Juhani Hopkins & Arja Kaitala
When individuals differ in their abilities to compete for a mate, weaker competitors may evolve tactics to increase their mating success. Exploiting attractiveness of others to get mates is a common tactic in many taxa, although examples of this behavior in females are scarce. In glow-worms (Lampyris noctiluca L., Coleoptera: Lampyridae), females attract males by glowing and males prefer the brightest female. How unattractive females succeed in competition for mates is largely understudied. We hypothesize...

Data from: Genomic signatures of parasite-driven natural selection in north European Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

Ksenia J. Zueva, Jaakko Lumme, Alexei E Veselov, Matthew P. Kent & Craig R. Primmer
Understanding the genomic basis of host-parasite adaptation is important for predicting the long-term viability of species and developing successful management practices. However, in wild populations, identifying specific signatures of parasite-driven selection often presents a challenge, as it is difficult to unravel the molecular signatures of selection driven by different, but correlated, environmental factors. Furthermore, separating parasite-mediated selection from similar signatures due to genetic drift and population history can also be difficult. Populations of Atlantic salmon...

Data from: Drivers of vegetative dormancy across herbaceous perennial plant species

Richard P. Shefferson, Tiiu Kull, Michael J. Hutchings, Marc-André Selosse, Hans Jacquemyn, Kimberly M. Kellett, Eric S. Menges, Richard B. Primack, Juha Tuomi, Kirsi Alahuhta, Sonja Hurskainen, Helen M. Alexander, Derek S. Anderson, Rein Brys, Emilia Brzosko, Slavomir Dostálik, Katharine Gregg, Zdeněk Ipser, Anne Jäkäläniemi, Jana Jersáková, W. Dean Kettle, Melissa K. McCormick, Ana Mendoza, Michael T. Miller, Asbjørn Moen … & Dennis F. Whigham
Vegetative dormancy, that is the temporary absence of aboveground growth for ≥ 1 year, is paradoxical, because plants cannot photosynthesise or flower during dormant periods. We test ecological and evolutionary hypotheses for its widespread persistence. We show that dormancy has evolved numerous times. Most species displaying dormancy exhibit life‐history costs of sprouting, and of dormancy. Short‐lived and mycoheterotrophic species have higher proportions of dormant plants than long‐lived species and species with other nutritional modes. Foliage...

Data from: Local adaptation and ecological differentiation under selection, migration and drift in Arabidopsis lyrata

Tuomas Hämälä, Tiina Marja Mattila & Outi Savolainen
How the balance between selection, migration and drift influences the evolution of local adaptation has been under intense theoretical scrutiny. Yet, empirical studies that relate estimates of local adaptation to quantification of gene flow and effective population sizes have been rare. Here, we conducted a reciprocal transplant trial, a common garden trial, and a whole-genome based demography analysis to examine these effects among Arabidopsis lyrata populations from two altitudinal gradients in Norway. Demography simulations indicated...

Data from: Climate-driven hydrological variability determines inter-annual changes in stream invertebrate community assembly

Romain Sarremejane, Heikki Mykra, Kaisa-Leena Huttunen, Kaisa-Riikka Mustonen, Hannu Marttila, Riku Paavola, Kalle Sippel, Noora Veijalainen & Timo Muotka
Although flow regime is one of the major drivers of riverine communities, not much is known about how inter-annual variability and extremes of flow influence community assembly mechanisms. We used data on benthic macroinvertebrates and modelled flow regimes in 23 near-pristine boreal streams to assess how community assembly mechanisms and species occupancy varied in response to inter-annual variability in flow conditions across 11 successive years encompassing extreme (both low and high) flow events. A null...

Data from: Gene flow in the European coal tit, Periparus ater (Aves: Passeriformes): low among Mediterranean populations but high in a continental contact zone

Christian Tritsch, Heiko Stuckas, Jochen Martens, Stefan Pentzold, Laura Kvist, Mario Lo Valvo, Gabriele Giacalone, Dieter Thomas Tietze, Alexander A. Nazarenko & Martin PÄckert
Extant phylogeographic patterns of Palearctic terrestrial vertebrates are generally believed to have originated from glacial range fragmentation. Post-Pleistocene range expansions have led to the formation of secondary contact zones among genetically distinct taxa. For coal tits (Periparus ater), such a contact zone has been localized in Germany. In this study, we quantified gene flow between Fennoscandian and southern European coal tits using a set of 13 microsatellite loci. STRUCTURE analysis revealed four genetic clusters two...

Data from: Inferences of genetic architecture of bill morphology in house sparrow using a high‐density SNP array point to a polygenic basis

Sarah L. Lundregan, Ingerid J. Hagen, Jostein Gohli, Alina K. Niskanen, Petri Kemppainen, Thor Harald Ringsby, Thomas Kvalnes, Henrik Pärn, Bernt Rønning, Håkon Holand, Peter S. Ranke, Anna S. Båtnes, Linn-Karina Selvik, Sigbjorn Lien, Bernt-Erik Sæther, Arild Husby, Henrik Jensen & Bernt-Erik Saether
Understanding the genetic architecture of quantitative traits can provide insights into the mechanisms driving phenotypic evolution. Bill morphology is an ecologically important and phenotypically variable trait, which is highly heritable and closely linked to individual fitness. Thus, bill morphology traits are suitable candidates for gene mapping analyses. Previous studies have revealed several genes that may influence bill morphology, but the similarity of gene and allele effects between species and populations is unknown. Here, we develop...

Data from: Northward expanding resident species benefit from warming winters through increased foraging rates and predator vigilance

Veli-Matti Pakanen, Eveliina Ahonen, Esa Hohtola & Seppo Rytkönen
Species distributions shift northwards due to climate change, but the ecological mechanisms allowing range expansions are not fully understood. Most studies have concentrated on breeding seasons, but winter warming may also be important. Wintering distributions are restricted by food availability and temperature, which may also interact. Foraging in cold conditions requires adaptations as individuals have to be efficient in foraging, while staying warm and vigilant for predators. When the ambient temperature declines, foraging rates should...

Data from: Combined effects of local habitat, anthropogenic stress, and dispersal on stream ecosystems: a mesocosm experiment

Jarno Turunen, Pauliina Louhi, Heikki Mykrä, Jukka Aroviita, Emmi Putkonen, Ari Huusko & Timo Muotka
The effects of anthropogenic stressors on community structure and ecosystem functioning can be strongly influenced by local habitat structure and dispersal from source communities. Catchment land uses increase the input of fine sediments into stream channels, clogging the interstitial spaces of benthic habitats. Aquatic macrophytes enhance habitat heterogeneity and mediate important ecosystem functions, being thus a key component of habitat structure in many streams. Therefore, the recovery of macrophytes following in-stream habitat modification may be...

Data from: Low dose of neonicotinoid insecticide reduces foraging motivation of bumblebees

Juho Lämsä, Erno Kuusela, Juha Tuomi, Sini Juntunen & Phillip C. Watts
Widespread use of neonicotinoid insecticides, such as imidacloprid, is often associated with diminishing populations of bees; this loss of pollinators presents a concern for food security and may cause unpredictable changes in ecological networks. However, little is known about the potential behavioral mechanisms behind the neonicotinoid-associated pollinator decline. We quantified the effects of low dose (1 ppb) imidacloprid exposure on the foraging behaviour of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris). Individual bumblebees were released into a flight arena...

Data from: From feces to data: a metabarcoding method for analyzing consumed and available prey in a bird-insect food web

Seppo Rytkönen, Eero J. Vesterinen, Coen Westerduin, Tiina Leviäkangas, Emma Vatka, Marko Mutanen, Panu Välimäki, Markku Hukkanen, Marko Suokas & Markku Orell
Diets play a key role in understanding trophic interactions. Knowing the actual structure of food webs contributes greatly to our understanding of biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. The research of prey preferences of different predators requires knowledge not only of the prey consumed, but also of what is available. In this study, we applied DNA metabarcoding to analyze the diet of 4 bird species (willow tits Poecile montanus, Siberian tits Poecile cinctus, great tits Parus major...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    13

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    13

Affiliations

  • University of Oulu
    13
  • University of Helsinki
    4
  • Finnish Environment Institute
    2
  • Uppsala University
    2
  • Norwegian University of Life Sciences
    2
  • Norwegian University of Science and Technology
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • University of Sussex
    1
  • Research Institute for Nature and Forest
    1
  • Estonian University of Life Sciences
    1