19 Works

Maternal vitamin D during pregnancy and offspring autism and autism-associated traits: a prospective cohort study

Paul Madley-Dowd, Christina Dardani, Robyn E. Wootton, Kyle Dack, Tom Palmer, Rupert Thurston, Alexandra Havdahl, Jean Golding, Deborah Lawlor & Dheeraj Rai
Abstract Background There has been a growing interest in the association between maternal levels of vitamin D during pregnancy and offspring autism. However, whether any associations reflect causal effects is still inconclusive. Methods We used data from a UK-based pregnancy cohort study (Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children) comprising 7689 births between 1991 and 1992 with maternal blood vitamin D levels recorded during pregnancy and at least one recorded outcome measure, including autism diagnosis...

Sick leave and return to work after surgery for type II SLAP lesions of the shoulder. A secondary analysis of a randomised sham - controlled study

Jens Ivar Brox, Øystein Skare, Petter Mowinckel, Jostein Skranes Brox, Olav Reikerås & Cecilie Piene Schrøder
Objectives: To compare days on sick leave and assess predictors of return to work following shoulder surgery. Design: A secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial. Setting: Orthopaedic Department. Participants: 114 patients with type II superior labral tear from anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions of the shoulder. Interventions: Labral repair, biceps tenodesis or sham surgery. Outcome measures: Sick leave was obtained from national registers for the last year before and two years following surgery. Total...

Additional file 1 of Heavy-load exercise in older adults activates vasculogenesis and has a stronger impact on muscle gene expression than in young adults

Kaare M. Gautvik, Ole K. Olstad, Ulrika Raue, Vigdis T. Gautvik, Karl J. Kvernevik, Tor P. Utheim, Solveig Ravnum, Camilla Kirkegaard, Håvard Wiig, Garan Jones, Luke C. Pilling, Scott Trappe, Truls Raastad & Sjur Reppe
Addiitional file 1: Figure S1. Comparison of transcript signal levels between os ilium–associated muscle and thigh muscle. Figure S2. Genes within the Diseases and Function category Vasculogenesis with increased (red) or reduced (green) expression end vs start of the training period in elderly as compared to young. Table S1. Common annotated genes changed in elderly in both Oslo and BSU cohorts at Q-value<0.1.

Heavy-load exercise in older adults activates vasculogenesis and has a stronger impact on muscle gene expression than in young adults

Kaare M. Gautvik, Ole K. Olstad, Ulrika Raue, Vigdis T. Gautvik, Karl J. Kvernevik, Tor P. Utheim, Solveig Ravnum, Camilla Kirkegaard, Håvard Wiig, Garan Jones, Luke C. Pilling, Scott Trappe, Truls Raastad & Sjur Reppe
Abstract Background A striking effect of old age is the involuntary loss of muscle mass and strength leading to sarcopenia and reduced physiological functions. However, effects of heavy-load exercise in older adults on diseases and functions as predicted by changes in muscle gene expression have been inadequately studied. Methods Thigh muscle global transcriptional activity (transcriptome) was analyzed in cohorts of older and younger adults before and after 12–13 weeks heavy-load strength exercise using Affymetrix microarrays....

Additional file 1 of Maternal vitamin D during pregnancy and offspring autism and autism-associated traits: a prospective cohort study

Paul Madley-Dowd, Christina Dardani, Robyn E. Wootton, Kyle Dack, Tom Palmer, Rupert Thurston, Alexandra Havdahl, Jean Golding, Deborah Lawlor & Dheeraj Rai
Additional file 1. Supplementary material.

Additional file 1 of Assessing trial representativeness using serious adverse events: an observational analysis using aggregate and individual-level data from clinical trials and routine healthcare data

Peter Hanlon, Elaine Butterly, Anoop S. V. Shah, Laurie J. Hannigan, Sarah H. Wild, Bruce Guthrie, Frances S. Mair, Sofia Dias, Nicky J. Welton & David A. McAllister
Additional file 1: Supplementary figures S1-S21. Trial level estimates of observed/expected SAEs. Figure S1. Observed/expected SAEs in asthma trials. Figure S2. Observed/expected SAEs in atrial fibrillation trials. Figure S3. Observed/expected SAEs in axial spondyloarthritis trials. Figure S4. Observed/expected SAEs in benign prostatic hyperplasia trials. Figure S5. Observed/expected SAEs in dementia trials. Figure S6. Observed/expected SAEs in type 2 diabetes mellitus trials. Figure S7. Observed/expected SAEs in epilepsy trials. Figure S8. Observed/expected SAEs in hypertension trials....

Additional file 3 of Assessing trial representativeness using serious adverse events: an observational analysis using aggregate and individual-level data from clinical trials and routine healthcare data

Peter Hanlon, Elaine Butterly, Anoop S. V. Shah, Laurie J. Hannigan, Sarah H. Wild, Bruce Guthrie, Frances S. Mair, Sofia Dias, Nicky J. Welton & David A. McAllister
Additional file 3: Supplementary figures S24-S44. Observed/expected SAEs before and after standardization by multimorbidity count. Figure S24. Observed/expected SAEs before and after standardization by multimorbidity count: asthma trials. Figure S25. Observed/expected SAEs before and after standardization by multimorbidity count: atrial fibrillation trials. Figure S26. observed/expected SAEs before and after standardization by multimorbidity count: axial spondyloarthritis trials. Figure S27. Observed/expected SAEs before and after standardization by multimorbidity count: benign prostatic hyperplasia trials. Figure S28. Observed/expected SAEs...

Additional file 1 of Maternal vitamin D during pregnancy and offspring autism and autism-associated traits: a prospective cohort study

Paul Madley-Dowd, Christina Dardani, Robyn E. Wootton, Kyle Dack, Tom Palmer, Rupert Thurston, Alexandra Havdahl, Jean Golding, Deborah Lawlor & Dheeraj Rai
Additional file 1. Supplementary material.

Maternal vitamin D during pregnancy and offspring autism and autism-associated traits: a prospective cohort study

Paul Madley-Dowd, Christina Dardani, Robyn E. Wootton, Kyle Dack, Tom Palmer, Rupert Thurston, Alexandra Havdahl, Jean Golding, Deborah Lawlor & Dheeraj Rai
Abstract Background There has been a growing interest in the association between maternal levels of vitamin D during pregnancy and offspring autism. However, whether any associations reflect causal effects is still inconclusive. Methods We used data from a UK-based pregnancy cohort study (Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children) comprising 7689 births between 1991 and 1992 with maternal blood vitamin D levels recorded during pregnancy and at least one recorded outcome measure, including autism diagnosis...

Additional file 3 of Assessing trial representativeness using serious adverse events: an observational analysis using aggregate and individual-level data from clinical trials and routine healthcare data

Peter Hanlon, Elaine Butterly, Anoop S. V. Shah, Laurie J. Hannigan, Sarah H. Wild, Bruce Guthrie, Frances S. Mair, Sofia Dias, Nicky J. Welton & David A. McAllister
Additional file 3: Supplementary figures S24-S44. Observed/expected SAEs before and after standardization by multimorbidity count. Figure S24. Observed/expected SAEs before and after standardization by multimorbidity count: asthma trials. Figure S25. Observed/expected SAEs before and after standardization by multimorbidity count: atrial fibrillation trials. Figure S26. observed/expected SAEs before and after standardization by multimorbidity count: axial spondyloarthritis trials. Figure S27. Observed/expected SAEs before and after standardization by multimorbidity count: benign prostatic hyperplasia trials. Figure S28. Observed/expected SAEs...

Additional file 2 of Assessing trial representativeness using serious adverse events: an observational analysis using aggregate and individual-level data from clinical trials and routine healthcare data

Peter Hanlon, Elaine Butterly, Anoop S. V. Shah, Laurie J. Hannigan, Sarah H. Wild, Bruce Guthrie, Frances S. Mair, Sofia Dias, Nicky J. Welton & David A. McAllister
Additional file 2: Supplementary figures S22-23 Comparison of SAEs between trial arms. Figure S22. Trial-level comparison of SAE rate between trial arms. Figure S23. Index condition-level meta-analyses of comparison of SAE rate between trial arms.

Additional file 4 of Assessing trial representativeness using serious adverse events: an observational analysis using aggregate and individual-level data from clinical trials and routine healthcare data

Peter Hanlon, Elaine Butterly, Anoop S. V. Shah, Laurie J. Hannigan, Sarah H. Wild, Bruce Guthrie, Frances S. Mair, Sofia Dias, Nicky J. Welton & David A. McAllister
Additional file 4. Statistical methods.

Additional file 1 of Heavy-load exercise in older adults activates vasculogenesis and has a stronger impact on muscle gene expression than in young adults

Kaare M. Gautvik, Ole K. Olstad, Ulrika Raue, Vigdis T. Gautvik, Karl J. Kvernevik, Tor P. Utheim, Solveig Ravnum, Camilla Kirkegaard, Håvard Wiig, Garan Jones, Luke C. Pilling, Scott Trappe, Truls Raastad & Sjur Reppe
Addiitional file 1: Figure S1. Comparison of transcript signal levels between os ilium–associated muscle and thigh muscle. Figure S2. Genes within the Diseases and Function category Vasculogenesis with increased (red) or reduced (green) expression end vs start of the training period in elderly as compared to young. Table S1. Common annotated genes changed in elderly in both Oslo and BSU cohorts at Q-value<0.1.

Heavy-load exercise in older adults activates vasculogenesis and has a stronger impact on muscle gene expression than in young adults

Kaare M. Gautvik, Ole K. Olstad, Ulrika Raue, Vigdis T. Gautvik, Karl J. Kvernevik, Tor P. Utheim, Solveig Ravnum, Camilla Kirkegaard, Håvard Wiig, Garan Jones, Luke C. Pilling, Scott Trappe, Truls Raastad & Sjur Reppe
Abstract Background A striking effect of old age is the involuntary loss of muscle mass and strength leading to sarcopenia and reduced physiological functions. However, effects of heavy-load exercise in older adults on diseases and functions as predicted by changes in muscle gene expression have been inadequately studied. Methods Thigh muscle global transcriptional activity (transcriptome) was analyzed in cohorts of older and younger adults before and after 12–13 weeks heavy-load strength exercise using Affymetrix microarrays....

Additional file 4 of Assessing trial representativeness using serious adverse events: an observational analysis using aggregate and individual-level data from clinical trials and routine healthcare data

Peter Hanlon, Elaine Butterly, Anoop S. V. Shah, Laurie J. Hannigan, Sarah H. Wild, Bruce Guthrie, Frances S. Mair, Sofia Dias, Nicky J. Welton & David A. McAllister
Additional file 4. Statistical methods.

Assessing trial representativeness using serious adverse events: an observational analysis using aggregate and individual-level data from clinical trials and routine healthcare data

Peter Hanlon, Elaine Butterly, Anoop S. V. Shah, Laurie J. Hannigan, Sarah H. Wild, Bruce Guthrie, Frances S. Mair, Sofia Dias, Nicky J. Welton & David A. McAllister
Abstract Background The applicability of randomised controlled trials of pharmacological agents to older people with frailty/multimorbidity is often uncertain, due to concerns that trials are not representative. However, assessing trial representativeness is challenging and complex. We explore an approach assessing trial representativeness by comparing rates of trial serious adverse events (SAE) to rates of hospitalisation/death in routine care. Methods This was an observational analysis of individual (125 trials, n=122,069) and aggregate-level drug trial data (483...

Additional file 2 of Assessing trial representativeness using serious adverse events: an observational analysis using aggregate and individual-level data from clinical trials and routine healthcare data

Peter Hanlon, Elaine Butterly, Anoop S. V. Shah, Laurie J. Hannigan, Sarah H. Wild, Bruce Guthrie, Frances S. Mair, Sofia Dias, Nicky J. Welton & David A. McAllister
Additional file 2: Supplementary figures S22-23 Comparison of SAEs between trial arms. Figure S22. Trial-level comparison of SAE rate between trial arms. Figure S23. Index condition-level meta-analyses of comparison of SAE rate between trial arms.

Additional file 1 of Assessing trial representativeness using serious adverse events: an observational analysis using aggregate and individual-level data from clinical trials and routine healthcare data

Peter Hanlon, Elaine Butterly, Anoop S. V. Shah, Laurie J. Hannigan, Sarah H. Wild, Bruce Guthrie, Frances S. Mair, Sofia Dias, Nicky J. Welton & David A. McAllister
Additional file 1: Supplementary figures S1-S21. Trial level estimates of observed/expected SAEs. Figure S1. Observed/expected SAEs in asthma trials. Figure S2. Observed/expected SAEs in atrial fibrillation trials. Figure S3. Observed/expected SAEs in axial spondyloarthritis trials. Figure S4. Observed/expected SAEs in benign prostatic hyperplasia trials. Figure S5. Observed/expected SAEs in dementia trials. Figure S6. Observed/expected SAEs in type 2 diabetes mellitus trials. Figure S7. Observed/expected SAEs in epilepsy trials. Figure S8. Observed/expected SAEs in hypertension trials....

Assessing trial representativeness using serious adverse events: an observational analysis using aggregate and individual-level data from clinical trials and routine healthcare data

Peter Hanlon, Elaine Butterly, Anoop S. V. Shah, Laurie J. Hannigan, Sarah H. Wild, Bruce Guthrie, Frances S. Mair, Sofia Dias, Nicky J. Welton & David A. McAllister
Abstract Background The applicability of randomised controlled trials of pharmacological agents to older people with frailty/multimorbidity is often uncertain, due to concerns that trials are not representative. However, assessing trial representativeness is challenging and complex. We explore an approach assessing trial representativeness by comparing rates of trial serious adverse events (SAE) to rates of hospitalisation/death in routine care. Methods This was an observational analysis of individual (125 trials, n=122,069) and aggregate-level drug trial data (483...

Registration Year

  • 2022
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  • 2020
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Affiliations

  • Lovisenberg Diakonale Sykehus
    19
  • Norwegian Institute of Public Health
    14
  • University of Bristol
    14
  • London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
    10
  • University of Glasgow
    10
  • NIHR Imperial Biomedical Research Centre
    10
  • University of Edinburgh
    10
  • Public Health Scotland
    10
  • Imperial College London
    10
  • University of York
    10