15 Works

Data from: Marine ecosystem connectivity mediated by migrant–resident interactions and the concomitant cross-system flux of lipids

Mikael Van Deurs, Anders Persson, Martin Lindegren, Charlotte Jacobsen, Stefan Neuenfeldt, Christian Jørgensen & P. Anders Nilsson
Accumulating research argues that migrants influence the functioning and productivity of local habitats and ecosystems along migration routes and potentially drive cross-system energy fluxes of considerable magnitude, yet empirical documentation of local ecological effects and descriptions of the underlying mechanisms are surprisingly rare. In this study, we discovered migrant–resident interactions and substantial cross-system lipid transportation in the transition zone between the Baltic Sea and the North Sea where a resident cod population (predators) was found...

Data from: Resolution of a global mango and fig pest identity crisis

Andrew J. Johnson, Miloš Knížek, Thomas H. Atkinson, Bjarte H. Jordal, Randy C. Ploetz & Jiri Hulcr
Hypocryphalus Hopkins, 1915 and Cryphalus Erichson, 1836 (Curculionidae: Scolytinae: Cryphalini) are significant pests of fig, mango, and other economically important fruit trees, yet have received little attention from systematists. An integrated approach using molecular and morphological evidence resolved the identities of the species feeding on mango and fig. The following taxonomic changes are proposed: Hypocryphalus mangiferae (Stebbing, 1914), stat. rev.; Hypocryphalus dilutus (Eichhoff, 1878a), stat. rev. (=Cryphalus dilutusEichhoff, 1878b, syn. n.); Hypocryphalus discretus (Eichhoff, 1878a),...

Data from: Cryptic and pseudo-cryptic diversity in the world’s most common bark beetle – Hypothenemus eruditus

Marius Kambestad, Lawrence R. Kirkendall, Iren L. Knutsen & Bjarte H. Jordal
Hypothenemus eruditus is regarded as the world’s most common bark beetle, collected from numerous host plants on all forested continents. Previous taxonomic treatments remark that the species is morphologically variable and difficult to identify, but to date, no study has analyzed molecular data to investigate possible cryptic or seemingly cryptic (pseudo-cryptic) diversity in this species. We sequenced 216 specimens matching or closely resembling the currently accepted description of H. eruditus for a mitochondrial (COI) and...

Data from: Higher predation risk for insect prey at low latitudes and elevations

Tomas Roslin, Bess Hardwick, Vojtech Novotny, William K. Petry, Nigel R. Andrew, Ashley Asmus, Isabel C. Barrio, Yves Basset, Andrea Larissa Boesing, Timothy C. Bonebrake, Erin K. Cameron, Wesley Dáttilo, David A. Donoso, Pavel Drozd, Claudia L. Gray, David S. Hik, Sarah J. Hill, Tapani Hopkins, Shuyin Huang, Bonny Koane, Benita Laird-Hopkins, Liisa Laukkanen, Owen T. Lewis, Sol Milne, Isaiah Mwesige … & Eleanor M. Slade
Biotic interactions underlie ecosystem structure and function, but predicting interaction outcomes is difficult. We tested the hypothesis that biotic interaction strength increases toward the equator, using a global experiment with model caterpillars to measure predation risk. Across an 11,660-kilometer latitudinal gradient spanning six continents, we found increasing predation toward the equator, with a parallel pattern of increasing predation toward lower elevations. Patterns across both latitude and elevation were driven by arthropod predators, with no systematic...

Data from: Comparing microbiota profiles in induced and spontaneous sputum samples in COPD patients

Solveig Tangedal, Marianne Aanerud, Rune Grønseth, Christine Drengenes, Harald G. Wiker, Per S. Bakke & Tomas Eagan
Background: Induced and spontaneous sputum are used to evaluate the airways microbiota. Whether the sputum types can be used interchangeably in microbiota research is unknown. Our aim was to compare microbiota in induced and spontaneous sputum from COPD patients sampled during the same consultation. Methods: COPD patients from Bergen, Norway, were followed between 2006/2010, examined during the stable state and exacerbations. 30 patients delivered 36 sample pairs. DNA was extracted by enzymatic and mechanical lysis...

Data from: Evolution of virulence under intensive farming: salmon lice increase skin lesions and reduce host growth in salmon farms

Mathias S. Ugelvik, Arne Skorping, Olav Moberg & Adele Mennerat
Parasites rely on resources from a host and are selected to achieve an optimal combination of transmission and virulence. Human-induced changes in parasite ecology, such as intensive farming of hosts, might not only favor increased parasite abundances, but also alter the selection acting on parasites and lead to life history evolution. The trade-off between transmission and virulence could be affected by intensive farming practices such as high host density and the use of anti-parasitic drugs,...

Data from: Atlantic bluefin tuna spawn at suboptimal temperatures for their offspring

Patricia Reglero, Aurelio Ortega, Rosa Balbín, Francisco Javier Abascal, Antonio Medina, Edurne Blanco, Fernando De La Gándara, Diego Alvarez-Berastegui, Manuel Hidalgo, Leif Rasmuson, Francisco Alemany & Øyvind Fiksen
Life-history traits such as spawning migrations and timing of reproduction are adaptations to specific environmental constraints and seasonal cycles in many organisms’ annual routines. In this study we analyze how offspring fitness constrains spawning phenology in a large migratory apex predator, the Atlantic bluefin tuna. The reproductive schedule of Atlantic bluefin tuna varies between spawning sites suggesting plasticity to local environmental conditions. Generally, temperature is considered to be the main constraint on tuna spawning phenology....

Data from: Pushing the limits of photoreception in twilight conditions: The rod-like cone retina of the deep-sea pearlsides

Fanny De Busserolles, Fabio Cortesi, Jon Vidar Helvik, Wayne I. L. Davies, Rachel M. Templin, Robert K. P. Sullivan, Craig T. Michell, Jessica K. Mountford, Shaun P. Collin, Xabier Irigoien, Stein Kaartvedt & Justin Marshall
Most vertebrates have a duplex retina comprising two photoreceptor types, rods for dim-light (scotopic) vision and cones for bright-light (photopic) and color vision. However, deep-sea fishes are only active in dim-light conditions; hence, most species have lost their cones in favor of a simplex retina composed exclusively of rods. Although the pearlsides, Maurolicus spp., have such a pure rod retina, their behavior is at odds with this simplex visual system. Contrary to other deep-sea fishes,...

Data from: Ancient DNA reveals the Arctic origin of Viking Age cod from Haithabu, Germany

Bastiaan Star, Sanne Boessenkool, Agata T. Gondek, Elena A. Nikulina, Anne Karin Hufthammer, Christophe Pampoelie, Halvor Knutsen, Carl Andre, Heidi M. Nistelberger, Jan Dierking, Christoph Petereit, Dirk Heinrich, Kjetill S. Jakobsen, Nils Chr. Stenseth, Sissel Jentoft & James H. Barrett
Knowledge of the range and chronology of historic trade and long-distance transport of natural resources is essential for determining the impacts of past human activities on marine environments. However, the specific biological sources of imported fauna are often difficult to identify, in particular if species have a wide spatial distribution and lack clear osteological or isotopic differentiation between populations. Here, we report that ancient fish-bone remains, despite being porous, brittle, and light, provide an excellent...

Data from: On the missing link in ecology: improving communication between modellers and experimentalists

Jan Heuschele, Mikael T. Ekvall, Patrizio Mariani & Christian Lindemann
Collaboration between modellers and experimentalists is essential in ecological research, however, different obstacles linking both camps often hinder scientific progress. In this commentary, we discuss several issues of the current state of affairs in this research loop. Backed by an online survey amongst fellow ecologists, modellers and experimentalists alike, we identify two major areas that need to be mended. Firstly, differences in language and jargon lead to a lack of exchange of ideas and to...

Data from: Spring predictability explains different leaf-out strategies in the woody floras of North America, Europe and East Asia

Constantin M. Zohner, Blas M. Benito, Jason D. Fridley, Jens-Christian Svenning & Susanne S. Renner
Intuitively, interannual spring temperature variability (STV) should influence the leaf-out strategies of temperate zone woody species, with high winter chilling requirements in species from regions where spring warming varies greatly among years. We tested this hypothesis using experiments in 215 species and leaf-out monitoring in 1585 species from East Asia (EA), Europe (EU) and North America (NA). The results reveal that species from regions with high STV indeed have higher winter chilling requirements, and, when...

Data from: On formation-based sampling proxies and why they should not be used to correct the fossil record

Alexander M. Dunhill, Bjarte Hannisdal, Neil Brocklehurst & Michael J. Benton
The fossil record is a unique resource on the history of life, but it is well known to be incomplete. In a series of high-profile papers, a residual modelling technique has been applied to correct the raw palaeodiversity signal for this bias and incompleteness, and the claim is made that the processed time series are more accurate than the raw data. We apply empirical and simulation approaches to test for correlation and directionality of any...

Data from: Biological factors contributing to bark and ambrosia beetle species diversification

Jostein Gohli, Lawrence R. Kirkendall, Sarah M. Smith, Anthony I. Cognato, Jiri Hulcr & Bjarte H. Jordal
The study of species diversification can identify the processes that shape patterns of species richness across the tree of life. Here we perform comparative analyses of species diversification using a large dataset of bark beetles. Three examined covariates – permanent inbreeding (sibling mating), fungus farming, and major host type – represent a range of factors that may be important for speciation. We studied the association of these covariates with species diversification while controlling for evolutionary...

Data from: Density regulation in Northeast Atlantic fish populations: density dependence is stronger in recruitment than in somatic growth

Fabian Zimmermann, Daniel Ricard & Mikko Heino
1. Population regulation is a central concept in ecology, yet in many cases its presence and the underlying mechanisms are difficult to demonstrate. The current paradigm maintains that marine fish populations are predominantly regulated by density-dependent recruitment. 2. While it is known that density-dependent somatic growth can be present too, its general importance is unknown and most practical applications neglect it. This study aimed to close this gap by for the first time quantifying and...

Data from: Invest more and die faster: the life history of a parasite on intensive farms

Adele Mennerat, Mathias Stølen Ugelvik, Camilla Håkonsrud Jensen & Arne Skorping
Organisms are expected to respond to alterations in their survival by evolutionary changes in their life history traits. As agriculture and aquaculture have become increasingly intensive in the past decades, there has been growing interest in their evolutionary effects on the life histories of agri- and aquacultural pests, parasites and pathogens. In this study we used salmon lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) to explore how modern farming might have affected life history evolution in parasites. We infected...

Registration Year

  • 2017
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Affiliations

  • University of Bergen
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  • Lund University
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  • Aarhus University
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  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
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  • University of Florida
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  • Institute of Hydrobiology
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  • University of Eastern Finland
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  • Spanish Institute of Oceanography
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  • The University of Texas at Austin
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