12 Works

Data from: Quantifying climate sensitivity and climate-driven change in North American amphibian communities

David A. W. Miller, Evan H. Campbell Grant, Erin Muths, Staci M. Amburgey, Michael J. Adams, Maxwell B. Joseph, J. Hardin Waddle, Pieter T. J. Johnson, Maureen E. Ryan, Benedikt R. Schmidt, Daniel L. Calhoun, Courtney L. Davis, Robert N. Fisher, David M. Green, Blake R. Hossack, Tracy A. G. Rittenhouse, Susan C. Walls, Larissa L. Bailey, Sam S. Cruickshank, Gary M. Fellers, Thomas A. Gorman, Carola A. Haas, Ward Hughson, David S. Pilliod, Steven J. Price … & Brent H. Sigafus
Changing climate will impact species’ ranges only when environmental variability directly impacts the demography of local populations. However, measurement of demographic responses to climate change has largely been limited to single species and locations. Here we show that amphibian communities are responsive to climatic variability, using >500,000 time-series observations for 81 species across 86 North American study areas. The effect of climate on local colonization and persistence probabilities varies among eco-regions and depends on local...

Data from: Capture enrichment of aquatic environmental DNA: a first proof of concept

Taylor M. Wilcox, Katherine E. Zarn, Maxine P. Piggott, Michael K. Young, Kevin S. McKelvey & Michael K. Schwartz
Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling – the detection of genetic material in the environment to infer species presence – has rapidly grown as a tool for sampling aquatic animal communities. A potentially powerful feature of environmental sampling is that all taxa within the habitat shed DNA and so may be detectable, creating opportunity for whole-community assessments. However, animal DNA in the environment tends to be comparatively rare, making it necessary to enrich for genetic targets from...

Data from: Post‐independence mortality of juveniles is driven by anthropogenic hazards for two passerines in an urban landscape

Solny A. Adalsteinsson, Jeffrey J. Buler, Jacob L. Bowman, Vincent D'Amico, Zachary S. Ladin & W. Gregory Shriver
Urban environments impose novel selection pressures with varying impacts across species and life history stages. The post‐fledging stage for migratory passerines, defined as the period of time from when hatch‐year birds fledge until their first migration, is a poorly understood component of annual productivity that potentially limits population growth. We studied two migratory passerines with positive and negative population responses to urbanization, respectively: Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) and Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina). Our goals were...

Hawaiian forest bird foraging height

Erin Wilson Rankin, Jessie Knowlton, Daniel Gruner, David Flaspohler, Christian Giardina, Devin Leopold, Anna Buckhardt, William Pitt & Tadashi Fukami
Data relevant to study on the foraging height of Hawaiian forest birds collected in kipuka along the Saddle Road, Upper Waiakea Forest Reserve.

Data from: Transient synchrony among populations of five foliage-feeding Lepidoptera

Maartje J. Klapwijk, Jonathan A. Walter, Aniko Hirka, György Csóka, Christer Björkman & Andrew M. Liebhold
1. Studies of transient population dynamics have largely focused on temporal changes in dynamical behavior, such as the transition between periods of stability and instability. The present study explores a related dynamic pattern, namely transient synchrony during a 49-year period among populations of five sympatric species of forest insects that share host tree resources. The long time-series allows a more comprehensive exploration of transient synchrony patterns than most previous studies. Considerable variation existed in the...

Data from: Delaying conservation actions matters for species vulnerable to climate change

Ilona Naujokaitis-Lewis, Lars Y. Pomara & Benjamin Zuckerberg
1. Most climate change adaptation efforts emphasize where to implement management actions, whereas timing remains largely overlooked. The rate of modern climate change introduces urgency in evaluating whether delaying conservation actions compromises their efficacy for reaching important conservation targets. 2. We evaluated the importance of multiple climate change adaptation strategies including timing of actions on preventing extinctions for a threatened climate-sensitive species, the Eastern Massasauga rattlesnake (Sistrurus catenatus). We parameterised a range-wide population viability analysis...

Data from: The fluctuating resource hypothesis explains invasibility, but not exotic advantage following disturbance

Dean E. Pearson, Yvette K. Ortega, Diego Villarreal, Ylva Lekberg, Marina C. Cock, Ozkan Eren & Jose L. Hierro
Invasibility is a key indicator of community susceptibility to changes in structure and function. The fluctuating resource hypothesis (FRH) postulates that invasibility is an emergent community property, a manifestation of multiple processes that cannot be reliably predicted by individual community attributes like diversity or productivity. Yet, research has emphasized the role of these individual attributes, with the expectation that diversity should deter invasibility and productivity enhance it. In an effort to explore how these and...

Data from: The abundance and distribution of guilds of riparian woody plants change in response to land use and flow regulation

Francisca C. Aguiar, Pedro Segurado, Maria João Martins, Maria Dolores Bejarano, Christer Nilsson, Maria Manuela Portela & David M. Merritt
1. Many riparian ecosystems in Mediterranean Europe are affected by land use and flow alteration by dams. We focused on understanding how these stressors and their components affect riparian forests in the region. We asked: (i) are there well-defined, responsive riparian guilds?; (ii) do dam-induced stream flows determine abundance and distribution of riparian guilds? and (iii) what are the main drivers governing composition and cover of riparian guilds in regulated rivers? 2. We inventoried the...

Data from: Integrative taxonomy refutes a species hypothesis: the asymmetric hybrid origin of Arsapnia arapahoe (Plecoptera, Capniidae)

Michael K. Young, Rebecca J. Smith, Kristine L. Pilgrim, Matthew P. Fairchild & Michael K. Schwartz
Molecular tools are commonly directed at refining taxonomies and the species that constitute their fundamental units. This has been especially insightful for groups for which species hypotheses are ambiguous and have largely been based on morphological differences between certain life stages or sexes, and has added importance when taxa are a focus of conservation efforts. Here we examine the taxonomic status of Arsapnia arapahoe, a winter stonefly in the family Capniidae that is a species...

Data from: Disentangling the drivers of invasion spread in a vector-borne tree disease

Yutaka Osada, Takehisa Yamakita, Etsuko Shoda-Kagaya, Andrew M. Liebhold & Takehiko Yamanaka
1. Pine wilt disease (PWD) invaded southern Japan in the early 1900’s and has gradually expanded its range to northern Honshu (Japanese mainland). The disease is caused by a pathogenic North American nematode, which is transmitted by native pine sawyer beetles. Recently the disease has invaded other portions of East Asia and Europe where extensive mortality of host pines is anticipated to resemble historical patterns seen in Japan. 2. There is a critical need to...

Data from: Association mapping of ectomycorrhizal traits in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.)

Bridget J. Piculell, Pedro José Martínez-García, C. Dana Nelson & Jason D. Hoeksema
To understand how diverse mutualisms coevolve and how species adapt to complex environments, a description of the underlying genetic basis of the traits involved must be provided. For example, in diverse coevolving mutualisms, such as the interaction of host plants with a suite of symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi, a key question is whether host plants can coevolve independently with multiple species of symbionts, which depends on whether those interactions are governed independently by separate genes or...

Data from: Ecological correlates of the spatial co-occurrence of sympatric mammalian carnivores worldwide

Courtney L. Davis, Lindsey N. Rich, Zach J. Farris, Marcella J. Kelly, Mario S. Di Bitetti, Yamil Di Blanco, Sebastian Albanesi, Mohammad S. Farhadinia, Navid Gholikhani, Sandra Hamel, Bart J. Harmsen, Claudia Wultsch, Mamadou D. Kane, Quinton Martins, Asia J. Murphy, Robin Steenweg, S. Sunarto, Atieh Taktehrani, Kanchan Thapa, Jody M. Tucker, Jesse Whittington, Febri A. Widodo, Nigel G. Yoccoz & David A.W. Miller
The composition of local mammalian carnivore communities has far-reaching effects on terrestrial ecosystems worldwide. To better understand how carnivore communities are structured, we analyzed camera trap data for 108,087 trap days across 12 countries spanning 5 continents. We estimate local probabilities of co-occurrence among 768 species pairs from the order Carnivora and evaluate how shared ecological traits correlated with probabilities of co-occurrence. Within individual study areas, species pairs co-occurred more frequently than expected at random....

Registration Year

  • 2018
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • US Forest Service
    12
  • University of Montana
    2
  • Parks Canada
    2
  • Northern Research Station
    2
  • Virginia Tech
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • Michigan Technological University
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • Stanford University
    1
  • University of Belize
    1