3 Works

Extensive paraphyly in the typical owl family (Strigidae)

Jessie F Salter, Carl H Oliveros, Peter A Hosner, Joseph D Manthey, Mark B Robbins, Robert G Moyle, Robb T Brumfield & Brant C Faircloth
The typical owl family (Strigidae) comprises 194 species in 28 genera, 14 of which are monotypic. Relationships within and among genera in the typical owls have been challenging to discern because mitochondrial data have produced equivocal results and because many monotypic genera have been omitted from previous molecular analyses. Here, we collected and analyzed DNA sequences of ultraconserved elements (UCEs) from 43 species of typical owls to produce concatenated and multispecies coalescent-based phylogenetic hypotheses for...

Data from: Resolution of the ordinal phylogeny of mosses using targeted exons from organellar and nuclear genomes

Yang Liu, Matthew G. Johnson, Cymon J. Cox, Rafael Medina, Nicolas Devos, Alain Vanderpoorten, Lars Hedenäs, Neil E. Bell, James R. Shevock, Blanka Aguero, Dietmar Quandt, Norman J. Wickett, A. Jonathan Shaw & Bernard Goffinet
Mosses are a highly diverse lineage of land plants, whose diversification, spanning at least 400 million years, remains phylogenetically ambiguous due to the lack of fossils, massive early extinctions, late radiations, limited morphological variation, and conflicting signal among previously used markers. Here, we present phylogenetic reconstructions based on complete organellar exomes and a comparable set of nuclear genes for this major lineage of land plants. Our analysis of 142 species representing 29 of the 30...

Incorporating evaporative water loss into bioenergetic models of hibernation to test for relative influence of host and pathogen traits on white-nose syndrome

Catherine Haase, Nathan Fuller, C. Reed Hranac, David Hayman, Liam McGuire, Kaleigh Norquay, Kirk Silas, Craig Willis, Raina Plowright & Sarah Olson
Hibernation consists of extended durations of torpor interrupted by periodic arousals. The ‘dehydration hypothesis’ proposes that hibernating mammals arouse to replenish water lost through evaporation during torpor. Arousals are energetically expensive, and increased arousal frequency can alter survival throughout hibernation. Yet we lack a means to assess the effect of evaporative water loss (EWL), determined by animal physiology and hibernation microclimate, on torpor bout duration and subsequent survival. White-nose syndrome (WNS), a devastating disease impacting...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Texas Tech University
    3
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • University of Liège
    1
  • Duke University
    1
  • Fairy Lake Botanical Garden
    1
  • University of Algarve
    1
  • University of Connecticut
    1
  • University of Winnipeg
    1
  • Montana State University
    1
  • California Academy of Sciences
    1