40 Works

Data from: Secondary successional trajectories of structural and catabolic bacterial communities in oil polluted soil planted with hybrid poplar

Shinjini Mukherjee, Timo Sipilä, Pertti Pulkkinen & Kim Yrjälä
Poplars have widely been used for rhizoremediation of a broad range of organic contaminants for the past two decades. Still, there is a knowledge gap regarding the rhizosphere associated bacterial communities of poplars and their dynamics during the remediation process. It is envisaged that a detailed understanding of rhizosphere associated microbial populations will greatly contribute to a better design and implementation of rhizoremediation. In order to investigate the long-term succession of structural and catabolic bacterial...

Data from: Are ant supercolonies crucibles of a new major transition in evolution?

Patrick Kennedy, Tobias Uller & Heikki Helanterä
The biological hierarchy of genes, cells, organisms and societies is a fundamental reality in the living world. This hierarchy of entities did not arise ex nihilo at the origin of life, but rather has been serially generated by a succession of critical events known as ‘evolutionary transitions in individuality’ (ETIs). Given the sequential nature of ETIs, it is natural to look for candidates to form the next hierarchical tier. We analyse claims that these candidates...

Data from: Functional response of plant communities to clearcutting: management impacts differ between forest vegetation zones

Buntarou Kusumoto, Takayuki Shiono, Mai Miyoshi, Ryo Maeshiro, Shin-Jiro Fujii, Timo Kuuluvainen & Yasuhiro Kubota
1. Understanding of the ecological impacts of logging practices on biodiversity and associated ecosystem processes is essential for developing sustainable forest management approaches. We documented the impacts of clearcutting on the functional structure of tree and herbaceous communities in hemiboreal, cool-temperate, warm-temperate and subtropical forests in the Japanese archipelago and identified forest vegetation that is vulnerable to deterioration of important ecosystem functions. 2. We combined species data for leaf, stem, flower and fruit traits related...

Data from: Consensus RDA across dissimilarity coefficients for canonical ordination of community composition data

F. Guillaume Blanchet, Pierre Legendre, J. A. Colin Bergeron & Fangliang He
Understanding how habitat structures species assemblages in a community is one of the main goals of community ecology. To relate community patterns to particular factors defining habitat conditions, ecologists often use canonical ordinations such as canonical redundancy analysis (RDA). It is a common practice to use dissimilarity coefficients to perform canonical ordinations through distance-based RDA (db-RDA) or transformation-based RDA (tb-RDA). Dissimilarity coefficients are measures of resemblance where the information about species communities is condensed into...

Data from: Using heterozygosity–fitness correlations to study inbreeding depression in an isolated population of white-tailed deer founded by few individuals

Jon E. Brommer, Jaana Kekkonen & Mikael Wikström
A heterozygosity–fitness correlations (HFCs) may reflect inbreeding depression, but the extent to which they do so is debated. HFCs are particularly likely to occur after demographic disturbances such as population bottleneck or admixture. We here study HFC in an introduced and isolated ungulate population of white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus in Finland founded in 1934 by four individuals. A total of 422 ≥ 1-year-old white-tailed deer were collected in the 2012 hunting season in southern Finland...

Data from: A comparative study of egg recognition signature mixtures in Formica ants

Heikki Helanterä & Patrizia D'Ettorre
Processing of information from the environment, such as assessing group membership in social contexts, is a major determinant of inclusive fitness. For social insects, recognizing brood origin is crucial for inclusive fitness in many contexts, such as social parasitism and kin conflicts within colonies. Whether or not a recognition signature is informative in kin conflicts, depends on the extent of a genetic contribution into the cues. We investigated colony and matriline specific variation in egg...

Data from: Proxy comparison in ancient peat sediments: pollen, macrofossil and plant DNA

Laura Parducci, Minna Väliranta, J. Sakari Salonen, Tiina Ronkainen, Irina Matetovici, Sonia L. Fontana, Tiina Eskola, Pertti Sarala & Yoshihisa Suyama
We compared DNA, pollen and macrofossil data obtained from Weichselian interstadial and Holocene (maximum age 8400 cal yr BP) peat sediments from northern Europe and used them to reconstruct contemporary floristic compositions at two sites. The majority of the samples provided plant DNA sequences of good quality with success amplification rates depending on age. DNA and sequencing analysis provided five plant taxa from the older site and nine taxa from the younger site, corresponding to...

Data from: Competitive release leads to range expansion and rampant speciation in Malagasy dung beetles

Andreia Miraldo, Ilkka Hanski & Ilkka A. Hanski
Competition is often thought to promote ecological diversification and thereby to facilitate the coexistence of competitors during evolutionary radiations. At large spatial scales, species may also coexist by having allopatric distributions, which raises the question about the role of range expansion in the proliferation of species during radiations. Here, we integrate a well-sampled (50 out of 74 species) and timed phylogeny of Nanos and Apotolamprus dung beetles (Canthonini) in Madagascar with data on species’ geographical...

Data from: Host ecotype generates evolutionary and epidemiological divergence across a pathogen metapopulation

Anna-Liisa Laine, Jeremy J. Burdon, Adnane Nemri, Peter H. Thrall & A.-L. Laine
The extent and speed at which pathogens adapt to host resistance varies considerably. This presents a challenge for predicting when—and where—pathogen evolution may occur. While gene flow and spatially heterogeneous environments are recognized to be critical for the evolutionary potential of pathogen populations, we lack an understanding of how the two jointly shape coevolutionary trajectories between hosts and pathogens. The rust pathogen Melampsora lini infects two ecotypes of its host plant Linum marginale that occur...

Data from: Inbreeding-related trade-offs in stress-resistance in the ant Formica exsecta

Dalial Freitak, Nick Bos, Dimitri Stucki, Liselotte Sundström & L. Sundstrom
Inbred individuals and populations are predicted to suffer from inbreeding depression, especially in times of stress. Under natural conditions, organisms are exposed to more than one stressor at any one time, highlighting the importance of stress resistance traits. We studied how inbreeding- and immunity-related traits are correlated under different dietary conditions in the ant Formica exsecta. Its natural diet varies in the amount and nature of plant secondary compounds and the level of free radicals,...

Data from: A hyperparasite affects the population dynamics of a wild plant pathogen

Charlotte Tollenaere, Benoit Pernechele, Hannu S. Mäkinen, Steven R. Parratt, Mark Z. Németh, Gabor M. Kovács, Levente Kiss, Ayco J. M. Tack & Anna-Liisa Laine
Assessing the impact of natural enemies of plant and animal pathogens on their host's population dynamics is needed to determine the role of hyperparasites in affecting disease dynamics, and their potential for use in efficient control strategies of pathogens. Here we focus on the long-term study describing metapopulation dynamics of an obligate pathogen, the powdery mildew (Podosphaera plantaginis) naturally infecting its wild host plant (Plantago lanceolata) in the fragmented landscape of the Åland archipelago (southwest...

Data from: Geographic variation in sex-chromosome differentiation in the common frog (Rana temporaria)

Nicolas Rodrigues, Juha Merilä, Cécile Patrelle & Nicolas Perrin
In sharp contrast with birds and mammals, sex-determination systems in ectothermic vertebrates are often highly dynamic and sometimes multifactorial. Both environmental and genetic effects have been documented in common frogs (Rana temporaria). One genetic linkage group, mapping to the largest pair of chromosomes and harboring the candidate sex-determining gene Dmrt1, associates with sex in several populations throughout Europe, but association varies both within and among populations. Here we show that sex association at this linkage...

Data from: Small spermatophore size and reduced female fitness in an isolated butterfly population

Anne Duplouy & Ilkka Hanski
The Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia) has a small population (Ne ~100) on the small island of Pikku Tytärsaari (PT) in the Gulf of Finland. The population has remained completely isolated for ~100 generations, which has resulted in greatly reduced genetic variation and high genetic load (low fitness). In particular, females lay small egg clutches with low egg-hatching rate in comparison with a large reference population in the Åland Islands (ÅL). Here, we analyze to...

Data from: Cytochrome P450 gene Cyp337 and heritability of fitness traits in the Glanville fritillary butterfly

Maaike A. De Jong, Swee C. Wong, Rainer Lehtonen & Ilkka Hanski
Fitness-related life history traits often show substantial heritable genetic variation in natural populations, but knowledge of the genetic architecture of these traits is limited. In the Glanville fritillary butterfly, we measured the heritability of key life history traits in a large outdoor population cage during two years and generations, and combined this experiment with an association study of a set of candidate genes. The genes were selected on the basis of previous genomic and transcriptomic...

Data from: Positive shrub-tree interactions facilitate woody encroachment in boreal peatlands

Milena Holmgren, Ching-Yen Lin, Julian E. Murillo, Annelies Nieuwenhuis, Joyce Penninkhof, Natasja Sanders, Thomas Van Bart, Huib Van Veen, Harri Vasander, Marlies E. Vollebregt & Juul Limpens
Boreal ecosystems are warming roughly twice as fast as the global average, resulting in woody expansion that could further speed up the climate warming. Boreal peatbogs are waterlogged systems that store more than 30% of the global soil carbon. Facilitative effects of shrubs and trees on the establishment of new individuals could increase tree cover with profound consequences for the structure and functioning of boreal peatbogs, carbon sequestration and climate. We conducted two field experiments...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    40

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    40

Affiliations

  • University of Helsinki
    40
  • University of Oulu
    4
  • Wageningen University & Research
    4
  • University of Eastern Finland
    3
  • University of Aberdeen
    3
  • University of Oxford
    3
  • Lund University
    2
  • Eötvös Loránd University
    2
  • Forest Research Institute
    2
  • Wellcome Trust
    2