46 Works

Data from: Construction of ultra-dense linkage maps with Lep-MAP2: stickleback F2 recombinant crosses as an example

Pasi Rastas, Federico C. F. Calboli, Baocheng Guo, Takahito Shikano & Juha Merilä
High-density linkage maps are important tools for genome biology and evolutionary genetics by quantifying the extent of recombination, linkage disequilibrium and chromosomal rearrangements across chromosomes, sexes and populations. They provide one of the best ways to validate and refine de novo genome assemblies, with the power to identify errors in assemblies increasing with marker density. However, assembly of high-density linkage maps is still challenging due to software limitations. We describe Lep-MAP2, a software for ultra-dense...

Data from: What data to use for forest conservation planning? A comparison of coarse open and detailed proprietary forest inventory data in Finland

Joona A. Lehtomäki, Sakari Tuominen, Tuuli Toivonen, Antti Leinonen & Joona Lehtomäki
The boreal region is facing intensifying resource extraction pressure, but the lack of comprehensive biodiversity data makes operative forest conservation planning difficult. Many countries have implemented forest inventory schemes and are making extensive and up-to-date forest databases increasingly available. Some of the more detailed inventory databases, however, remain proprietary and unavailable for conservation planning. Here, we investigate how well different open and proprietary forest inventory data sets suit the purpose of conservation prioritization in Finland....

Data from: The shepherds' tale: a genome-wide study across 9 dog breeds implicates two loci in the regulation of fructosamine serum concentration in Belgian shepherds

Simon K. G. Forsberg, Marcin Kierczak, Ingrid Ljungvall, Anne-Christine Merveille, Vassiliki Gouni, Maria Wiberg, Jakob Lundgren Willesen, Sofia Hanås, Anne-Sophie Lequarré, Louise Mejer Sørensen, Laurent Tiret, Kathleen McEntee, Eija Seppälä, Jørgen Koch, Géraldine Battaille, Hannes Lohi, Merete Fredholm, Valerie Chetboul, Jens Häggström, Örjan Carlborg, Kerstin Lindblad-Toh & Katja Höglund
Diabetes mellitus is a serious health problem in both dogs and humans. Certain dog breeds show high prevalence of the disease, whereas other breeds are at low risk. Fructosamine and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) are two major biomarkers of glycaemia where serum concentrations reflect glucose turnover over the past few weeks to months. In this study, we searched for genetic factors influencing variation in serum fructosamine concentration in healthy dogs using data from nine dog breeds....

Data from: Crying wolf to a predator: deceptive vocal mimicry by a bird protecting young

Branislav Igic, Jessica McLachlan, Inkeri Lehtinen & Robert D. Magrath
Animals often mimic dangerous or toxic species to deter predators; however, mimicry of such species may not always be possible and mimicry of benign species seems unlikely to confer anti-predator benefits. We reveal a system in which a bird mimics the alarm calls of harmless species to fool a predator 40 times its size and protect its offspring against attack. Our experiments revealed that brown thornbills (Acanthiza pusilla) mimic a chorus of other species' aerial...

Data from: Lake size and fish diversity determine resource use and trophic position of a top predator in high-latitude lakes

Antti P. Eloranta, Kimmo K. Kahilainen, Per-Arne Amundsen, Rune Knudsen, Chris Harrod & Roger I. Jones
Prey preference of top predators and energy flow across habitat boundaries are of fundamental importance for structure and function of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, as they may have strong effects on production, species diversity, and food-web stability. In lakes, littoral and pelagic food-web compartments are typically coupled and controlled by generalist fish top predators. However, the extent and determinants of such coupling remains a topical area of ecological research and is largely unknown in oligotrophic...

Data from: Disentangling the ‘brown world’ faecal-detritus interaction web: dung beetle effects on soil microbial properties

Eleanor M. Slade, Tomas Roslin, Minna Santalahti & Thomas Bell
Many ecosystem services are sustained by the combined action of microscopic and macroscopic organisms, and shaped by interactions between the two. However, studies tend to focus on only one of these two components. We combined the two by investigating the impact of macrofauna on microbial community composition and functioning in the context of a major ecosystem process: the decomposition of dung. We compared bacterial communities of pasture soil and experimental dung pats inhabited by one...

Data from: Queen pheromones modulate DNA methyltransferase activity in bee and ant workers

Luke Holman, Kalevi Trontti & Heikki Helanterä
DNA methylation is emerging as an important regulator of polyphenism in the social insects. Research has concentrated on differences in methylation between queens and workers, though we hypothesized that methylation is involved in mediating other flexible phenotypes, including pheromone-dependent changes in worker behaviour and physiology. Here, we find that exposure to queen pheromone affects the expression of two DNA methyltransferase genes in Apis mellifera honeybees and in two species of Lasius ants, but not in...

Data from: The sexual selection paradigm: have we overlooked other mechanisms in the evolution of male ornaments?

Ulrika Candolin & Iina Tukiainen
Extravagant male ornaments expressed during reproduction are almost invariably assumed to be sexually selected and evolve through competition for mating opportunities. Yet in species where male reproductive success depends on the defence of offspring, male ornaments could also evolve through social competition for offspring survival. However, in contrast to female ornaments, this possibility has received little attention in males. We show that a male ornament that is traditionally assumed to be sexually selected—the red nuptial...

Data from: Effects of perceived predation risk and social environment on the development of three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) morphology

Nurul I. Ab Ghani, Gábor Herczeg & Juha Merilä
Phenotypically plastic changes in response to variation in perceived predation risk are widespread, but little is known about if and how social environment modulates induced responses to predation risk. We investigated the influence of perceived predation risk (i.e. chemical cues from a predator) and social environment (i.e. one, two or 20 individuals reared together) on three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) morphology in a factorial common garden experiment. We found that exposure to chemical cues from potential...

Data from: Increasing frequency of low summer precipitation synchronizes dynamics and compromises metapopulation stability in the Glanville fritillary butterfly

Ayco J. M. Tack, Tommi Mononen & Ilkka Hanski
Climate change is known to shift species' geographical ranges, phenologies and abundances, but less is known about other population dynamic consequences. Here, we analyse spatio-temporal dynamics of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia) in a network of 4000 dry meadows during 21 years. The results demonstrate two strong, related patterns: the amplitude of year-to-year fluctuations in the size of the metapopulation as a whole has increased, though there is no long-term trend in average abundance;...

Data from: Emerging patterns of genetic variation in the New Zealand endemic scallop Pecten novaezelandiae

Catarina N. S. Silva & Jonathan P. A. Gardner
Both historical and contemporary processes influence the genetic structure of species, but the relative roles of such processes are still difficult to access. Population genetic studies of species with recent evolutionary histories such as the New Zealand endemic scallop Pecten novaezelandiae (<1 Ma) permit testing of the effects of recent processes affecting gene flow and shaping genetic structure. In addition, studies encompassing the entire distributional range of species can provide insight into colonization processes. Analyses...

Data from: Mesoclosures – increasing realism in mesocosm studies of ecosystem functioning

Saija Lähteenmäki, Eleanor M. Slade, Bess Hardwick, Gustavo Schiffler, Júlio Louzada, Jos Barlow & Tomas Roslin
1. Experimental studies linking community composition to functioning are typically confined to small and closed micro- or mesocosms. Such restricted conditions may affect both species’ biology and their environment. Yet, targeting simple features in the behaviour of species may circumvent these constraints. Focusing on ecological functions provided by dung beetles, we test whether large, open-top cages – MESOCLOSURES – will intercept the flight trajectories of beetles, thereby allowing manipulation of local community composition. 2. MESOCLOSURES...

Data from: Temperature and sex related effects of serine protease alleles on larval development in the Glanville fritillary butterfly

Virpi Ahola, Patrik Koskinen, Swee Chong Wong, Jouni Kvist, Lars Paulin, Petri Auvinen, Marjo Saastamoinen, Mikko J. Frilander, Rainer Lehtonen & Ilkka Hanski
The body reserves of adult Lepidoptera are accumulated during larval development. In the Glanville fritillary butterfly, larger body size increases female fecundity, but in males fast larval development and early eclosion, rather than large body size, increase mating success and hence fitness. Larval growth rate is highly heritable, but genetic variation associated with larval development is largely unknown. By comparing the Glanville fritillary population living in the Åland Islands in northern Europe with a population...

Data from: Inter-annual variation and long-term trends in proportions of resident individuals in partially migratory birds

Kalle Meller, Anssi V Vähätalo, Tatu Hokkanen, Jukka Rintala, Markus Piha & Aleksi Lehikoinen
Partial migration – a part of a population migrates and another part stays resident year-round on the breeding site – is probably the most common type of migration in the animal kingdom, yet it has only lately garnered more attention. Theoretical studies indicate that in partially migratory populations, the proportion of resident individuals (PoR) should increase in high latitudes in response to the warming climate, but empirical evidence exists for few species. We provide the...

Data from: Strategies of zooplanktivory shape dynamics and diversity of littoral plankton communities: a mesocosm approach

Laura K. Helenius, Anna Aymà Padros, Elina Leskinen, Hannu Lehtonen & Leena Nurminen
Planktivorous fish can exert strong top-down control on zooplankton communities. By incorporating different feeding strategies, from selective particulate feeding to cruising filter feeding, fish species target distinct prey. In this study, we investigated the effects of two species with different feeding strategies, the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus (L.)) and roach (Rutilus rutilus (L.)), on a low-diversity brackish water zooplankton community using a 16-day mesocosm experiment. The experiment was conducted on a small-bodied spring zooplankton community...

Data from: Rewetting of drained boreal spruce swamp forests results in rapid recovery of Sphagnum production

Liisa Maanavilja, Laura Kangas, Lauri Mehtätalo & Eeva-Stiina Tuittila
1. Peatland rewetting aims to restore biomass accumulation from peat-forming plants for climate change mitigation, biotope conservation and water purification purposes. Boreal spruce swamp forests in Europe have suffered heavily from drainage for forestry and are now a focus of restoration efforts. 2. We measured Sphagnum height and biomass increment by allowing Sphagnum to grow through mesh nets located in nine undrained, nine drained and 18 rewetted boreal spruce swamp forests. 3. At the moss...

Data from: Temporal stability of genetic variability and differentiation in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus)

Jacquelin DeFaveri & Juha Merilä
Temporal variation in allele frequencies, whether caused by deterministic or stochastic forces, can inform us about interesting demographic and evolutionary phenomena occurring in wild populations. In spite of the continued surge of interest in the genetics of three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) populations, little attention has been paid towards the temporal stability of allele frequency distributions, and whether there are consistent differences in effective size (Ne) of local populations. We investigated temporal stability of genetic variability...

Data from: Air humidity thresholds trigger active moss spore release to extend dispersal in space and time

Victor Johansson, Niklas Lönnell, Üllar Rannik, Sebastian Sundberg & Kristoffer Hylander
1. Understanding the complete dispersal process is important for making realistic predictions of species distributions, but mechanisms for diaspore release in wind-dispersed species are often unknown. However, diaspore release under conditions that increase the probability of longer dispersal distances and mechanisms that extend dispersal events in time may have evolutionary advantages. 2. We quantified air humidity thresholds regulating spore release in the moss Brachythecium rutabulum. We also investigated the prevailing micrometeorological conditions when these thresholds...

Data from: Age-related effects of chronic hantavirus infection on female host fecundity

Eva R. Kallio, Heikki Helle, Esa Koskela, Tapio Mappes & Olli Vapalahti
1. Pathogens often cause detrimental effects to their hosts and, consequently, may influence host population dynamics that may, in turn, feed back to pathogen transmission dynamics. Understanding fitness effects of pathogens upon animal host populations can help to predict the risks that zoonotic pathogens pose to humans. 2. Here we determine whether chronic infection by Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) affects important fitness-related traits, namely the probability of breeding, reproductive effort and mother and offspring condition, in...

Data from: Different DMRT3 genotypes are best adapted for harness racing and riding in Finnhorses

Kim Jäderkvist Fegraeus, Lisa Johansson, Minna Mäenpää, Anna Mykkänen, Lisa S. Andersson, Brandon D. Velie, Leif Andersson, Thorvaldur Árnason & Gabriella Lindgren
Previous studies showed a positive effect of the DMRT3 “gait keeper” mutation on harness racing performance in Standardbreds, French-, and Nordic trotters. The mutation has also been shown to influence riding traits in multiple breeds. This study investigated the effect of the DMRT3 mutation on harness racing performance and riding traits in Finnhorses. Finnhorses used for harness racing (n = 180) and for riding (n = 59) were genotyped for the DMRT3 mutation. For the...

Data from: Enriched rearing environment and wild genetic background can enhance survival and disease resistance of salmonid fishes during parasite epidemics

Anssi Karvonen, Mariella Aalto-Araneda, Anna-Maija Virtala, Raine Kortet, Perttu Koski & Pekka Hyvärinen
The importance and volume of aquaculture is increasing world-wide. Rearing practices play a key role in determining growth rate, survival and disease resistance in aquaculture fishes. Recent evidence suggests that in comparison with a standard stimulus-poor rearing environment, an enriched or variable rearing environment has significant positive effects on several traits underlying growth and well-being of fish. However, the effect of enriched rearing on one of the most important threats for aquaculture development, occurrence of...

Data from: Exposing the structure of an Arctic food web

Eero J. Vesterinen, Helena K. Wirta, Peter A. Hambäck, Elisabeth Weingartner, Claus Rasmussen, Jeroen Reneerkens, Niels M. Schmidt, Olivier Gilg & Tomas Roslin
How food webs are structured has major implications for their stability and dynamics. While poorly studied to date, arctic food webs are commonly assumed to be simple in structure, with few links per species. If this is the case, then different parts of the web may be weakly connected to each other, with populations and species united by only a low number of links. We provide the first highly resolved description of trophic link structure...

Data from: Novel R pipeline for analyzing Biolog phenotypic microarray data

Minna Vehkala, Mikhail Shubin, Thomas R. Connor, Nicholas R. Thomson & Jukka Corander
Data produced by Biolog Phenotype MicroArrays are longitudinal measurements of cells’ respiration on distinct substrates. We introduce a three-step pipeline to analyze phenotypic microarray data with novel procedures for grouping, normalization and effect identification. Grouping and normalization are standard problems in the analysis of phenotype microarrays defined as categorizing bacterial responses into active and non-active, and removing systematic errors from the experimental data, respectively. We expand existing solutions by introducing an important assumption that active...

Data from: Migration and isolation during the turbulent Ponto-Caspian Pleistocene create high diversity in the crustacean Paramysis lacustris

Asta Audzijonyte, Laima Baltrūnaitė, Risto Väinölä & Kęstutis Arbačiauskas
The Ponto-Caspian brackish-water fauna inhabits estuaries and rivers of the Black, Azov and Caspian seas and is fragmented by higher salinity waters and a major interbasin watershed. The fauna is known for the high levels of endemism, complex zoogeographic histories, and as a recent source of successful invasive species. It remains debated whether the Black and Azov Sea brackish-water populations survived unfavourable Pleistocene conditions in multiple separate refugia or whether the two seas were (repeatedly)...

Data from: Genetic divergence between the sympatric queen morphs of the ant Myrmica rubra

Jenni Leppänen, Perttu Seppä, Kari Vepsäläinen & Riitta Savolainen
Pairs of obligate social parasites and their hosts, where some of the parasites have recently diverged from their host through intraspecific social parasitism, provide intriguing systems for studying the modes and processes of speciation. Such speciation, probably in sympatry, has also been propounded in the ant Myrmica rubra and its intraspecific social parasite. In this species, parasitism is associated with queen size dimorphism, and the small microgyne has become a social parasite of the large...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    46

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    46

Affiliations

  • University of Helsinki
    46
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    6
  • University of Jyväskylä
    6
  • Natural Resources Institute Finland
    4
  • University of Eastern Finland
    3
  • Eötvös Loránd University
    3
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • Finnish Environment Institute
    2
  • Australian National University
    2