53 Works

Data from: Breeding phenological response to spring weather conditions in common Finnish birds: resident species respond stronger than migratory species

Edward Kluen, Riikka Nousiainen & Aleksi Lehikoinen
National bird-nest record schemes provide a valuable data source to study large-scale changes in basic breeding biology and effects of climate change on birds. Using nest-record scheme data from 26 common Finnish breeding bird species from whole Finland, we estimated the laydate of the first egg for 129 063 nesting attempts. We then investigated the relationship of mean spring temperature and spring precipitation sum to changes in the onset of laying over the period 1961–2012....

Data from: Fatal diseases and parasitoids: from competition to facilitation in a shared host.

Ann E. Hajek & Saskya Van Nouhuys
Diverse parasite taxa share hosts both at the population level and within individual hosts and their interactions, ranging from competitive exclusion to facilitation, can drive community structure and dynamics. Emergent pathogens have the potential to greatly alter community interactions. We found that an emergent fungal entomopathogen dominated pre-existing lethal parasites in populations of the forest defoliating gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar. The parasite community was composed of the fungus and four parasitoid species that only develop...

Data from: Energy and lipid metabolism during direct and diapause development in a pierid butterfly

Philipp Lehmann, Peter Pruisscher, Diana Posledovich, Mikael Carlsson, Reijo Käkelä, Patrik Tang, Sören Nylin, Christopher W. Wheat, Christer Wiklund & Karl Gotthard
Diapause is a fundamental component of the life-cycle in the majority of insects living in environments characterized by strong seasonality. The present study addresses poorly understood associations and trade-offs between endogenous diapause duration, thermal sensitivity of development, energetic cost of development and cold tolerance. Diapause intensity, metabolic rate trajectories and lipid profiles of directly developing and diapausing animals were studied using pupae and adults of Pieris napi butterflies from a population for which endogenous diapause...

Data from: Local adaptation at higher trophic levels: contrasting hyperparasite-pathogen infection dynamics in the field and laboratory

Steven R. Parratt, Benoit Barrès, Rachel M. Penczykowski & Anna-Liisa Laine
Predicting and controlling infectious disease epidemics is a major challenge facing the management of agriculture, human and wildlife health. Coevolutionarily derived patterns of local adaptation among pathogen populations have the potential to generate variation in disease epidemiology, however studies of local adaptation in disease systems have mostly focused on interactions between competing pathogens or pathogens and their hosts. In nature, parasites and pathogens are also subject to attack by hyperparasitic natural enemies that can severely...

Data from: Wood-inhabiting fungi with tight associations with other species have declined as a response to forest management

Nerea Abrego, David Dunson, Panu Halme, Isabel Salcedo & Otso Ovaskainen
Research on mutualistic and antagonistic networks, such as plant–pollinator and host–parasite networks, has shown that species interactions can influence and be influenced by the responses of species to environmental perturbations. Here we examine whether results obtained for directly observable networks generalize to more complex networks in which species interactions cannot be observed directly. As a case study, we consider data on the occurrences of 98 wood-inhabiting fungal species in managed and natural forests. We specifically...

Data from: Fight or flight? - Flight increases immune gene expression but does not help to fight an infection

Luisa Woestmann, Jouni Kvist & Marjo Saastamoinen
Flight represents a key trait in most insects, being energetically extremely demanding, yet often necessary for foraging and reproduction. Additionally, dispersal via flight is especially important for species living in fragmented landscapes. Even though, based on life-history theory, a negative relationship may be expected between flight and immunity, a number of previous studies have indicated flight to induce an increased immune response. In this study, we assessed whether induced immunity (i.e. immune gene expression) in...

Data from: A mechanistic underpinning for sigmoid dose-dependent infection

Jani Anttila, Lauri Mikonranta, Tarmo Ketola, Veijo Kaitala, Jouni Laakso & Lasse Ruokolainen
Theoretical models of environmentally transmitted diseases often assume that transmission is a constant process, which scales linearly with pathogen dose. Here we question the applicability of such an assumption and propose a sigmoidal form for the pathogens infectivity response. In our formulation, this response arises under two assumptions: 1) multiple invasion events are required for a successful pathogen infection and 2) the host invasion state is reversible. The first assumption reduces pathogen infection rates at...

Data from: Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1: testing for a role in insect immunity, behaviour and reproduction

Robert Peuß, Kristina U. Wensing, Luisa Woestmann, Hendrik Eggert, Barbara Milutinović, Marlene G. U. Sroka, Jörn P. Scharsack, Joachim Kurtz & Sophie A. O. Armitage
Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1 (Dscam1) has wide-reaching and vital neuronal functions although the role it plays in insect and crustacean immunity is less well understood. In this study, we combine different approaches to understand the roles that Dscam1 plays in fitness-related contexts in two model insect species. Contrary to our expectations, we found no short-term modulation of Dscam1 gene expression after haemocoelic or oral bacterial exposure in Tribolium castaneum, or after haemocoelic bacterial...

Data from: The genetic contribution to sex determination and number of sex chromosomes vary among populations of common frogs (Rana temporaria)

Nicolas Rodrigues, Yvan Vuille, Alan Brelsford, Juha Merilä & Nicolas Perrin
The patterns of sex determination and sex differentiation have been shown to differ among geographic populations of common frogs. Notably, the association between phenotypic sex and linkage group 2 (LG2) has been found to be perfect in a northern Swedish population, but weak and variable among families in a southern one. By analyzing these populations with markers from other linkage groups, we bring two new insights: (1) the variance in phenotypic sex not accounted for...

Data from: Revisiting the measurement of anomie

Ali Teymoori, Jolanda Jetten, Brock Bastian, Amarina Ariyanto, Frédérique Autin, Nadia Ayub, Constantina Badea, Tomasz Besta, Fabrizio Butera, Rui Costa-Lopes, Lijuan Cui, Carole Fantini, Gillian Finchilesc, Lowell Gaertner, Mario Gollwitzer, Ángel Gómez, Roberto González, Ying Yi Hong, Dorthe Høj Jensen, Minoru Karasawa, Thomas Kessler, Olivier Klein, Marcus Lima, Tuuli Anna Mähönen, Laura Megevand … & Gillian Finchilescu
Sociologists coined the term "anomie" to describe societies that are characterized by disintegration and deregulation. Extending beyond conceptualizations of anomie that conflate the measurements of anomie as 'a state of society' and as a 'state of mind', we disentangle these conceptualizations and develop an analysis and measure of this phenomenon focusing on anomie as a perception of the 'state of society'. We propose that anomie encompasses two dimensions: a perceived breakdown in social fabric (i.e.,...

Data from: Towards a common methodology for developing logistic tree mortality models based on ring-width data

Maxime Cailleret, Christof Bigler, Harald Bugmann, J. Julio Camarero, Katarina Cufar, Hendrik Davi, Ilona Mészáros, Francesco Minunno, Mikko Peltoniemi, Elisabeth Robert, María-Laura Suarez, Roberto Tognetti & Jordi Martinez-Vilalta
Tree mortality is a key process shaping forest dynamics. Thus, there is a growing need for indicators of the likelihood of tree death. During the last decades, an increasing number of tree-ring based studies have aimed to derive growth–mortality functions, mostly using logistic models. The results of these studies, however, are difficult to compare and synthesize due to the diversity of approaches used for the sampling strategy (number and characteristics of alive and death observations),...

Data from: Controlling for p-value inflation in allele frequency change in experimental evolution and artificial selection experiments

Petri Kemppainen, Bernt Rønning, Thomas Kvalnes, Ingerid J. Hagen, Thor Harald Ringsby, Anna M. Billing, Henrik Pärn, Sigbjorn Lien, Arild Husby, Bernt-Erik Sæther, Henrik Jensen & Bernt-Erik Saether
Experimental evolution studies can be used to explore genomic response to artificial and natural selection. In such studies, loci that display larger allele frequency change than expected by genetic drift alone are assumed to be directly or indirectly associated with traits under selection. However, such studies report surprisingly many loci under selection, suggesting that current tests for allele frequency change may be subject to p-value inflation and hence be anti-conservative. One factor known from genome...

Data from: What you need is what you eat? Prey selection by the bat Myotis daubentonii

Eero J. Vesterinen, Lasse Ruokolainen, Niklas Wahlberg, Carlos Peña, Tomas Roslin, Veronika N. Laine, Ville Vasko, Ilari E. Sääksjärvi, Kai Norrdahl & Thomas M. Lilley
Optimal foraging theory predicts that predators are selective when faced with abundant prey, but become less picky when prey gets sparse. Insectivorous bats in temperate regions are faced with the challenge of building up fat reserves vital for hibernation during a period of decreasing arthropod abundances. According to optimal foraging theory, prehibernating bats should adopt a less selective feeding behaviour – yet empirical studies have revealed many apparently generalized species to be composed of specialist...

Data from: Combined analysis of variation in core, accessory and regulatory genome regions provides a super-resolution view into the evolution of bacterial populations

Alan McNally, Yaara Oren, Darren Kelly, Ben Pascoe, Steven Dunn, Tristan Seecharan, Minna Vehkala, Niko Välimäki, Michael B. Prentice, Amgad Ashour, Oren Avram, Tal Pupko, Ulrich Dobrindt, Ivan Literak, Sebastian Guenther, Katharina Schauffler, Lothar H. Wieler, Zong Zhiyong, Samuel K. Sheppard, James O. McInerney, Jukka Corander & Tristan Sreecharan
The use of whole-genome phylogenetic analysis has revolutionized our understanding of the evolution and spread of many important bacterial pathogens due to the high resolution view it provides. However, the majority of such analyses do not consider the potential role of accessory genes when inferring evolutionary trajectories. Moreover, the recently discovered importance of the switching of gene regulatory elements suggests that an exhaustive analysis, combining information from core and accessory genes with regulatory elements could...

Data from: Cross-frequency synchronization connects networks of fast and slow oscillations during visual working memory maintenance

Felix Siebenhühner, Sheng H. Wang, J. Matias Palva & Satu Palva
Neuronal activity in sensory and fronto-parietal (FP) areas underlies the representation and attentional control, respectively, of sensory information maintained in visual working memory (VWM). Within these regions, beta/gamma phase-synchronization supports the integration of sensory functions, while synchronization in theta/alpha bands supports the regulation of attentional functions. A key challenge is to understand which mechanisms integrate neuronal processing across these distinct frequencies and thereby the sensory and attentional functions. We investigated whether such integration could be...

Data from: Diagnosing depression in chronic pain patients: DSM-IV Major Depressive Disorder vs. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)

Peter Knaster, Ann-Mari Estlander, Jaakko Kaprio, Hasse Karlsson & Eija Kalso
Background: Diagnosing depression in chronic pain is challenging due to overlapping somatic symptoms. In questionnaires, such as the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), responses may be influenced more by pain than by the severity of depression. In addition, previous studies have suggested that symptoms of negative self-image, a key element in depression, are uncommon in chronic pain-related depression. The object of this study is to assess the relationship of the somatic and cognitive-emotional items of BDI...

Data from: Sex allocation conflict between queens and workers in Formica pratensis wood ants predicts seasonal sex ratio variation

Heikki Helanterä, Jonna Kulmuni & Pekka Pamilo
Sex allocation theory predicts parents should adjust their investment in male and female offspring in a way that increases parental fitness. This has been shown in several species and selective contexts. Yet, seasonal sex ratio variation within species and its underlying causes are poorly understood. Here we study sex allocation variation in the wood ant Formica pratensis. This species displays conflict over colony sex ratio as workers and queens prefer different investment in male and...

Data from: Bridge under troubled water: turbulence and niche partitioning in fish foraging

Zeynep Pekcan-Hekim, Noora Hellén, Laura Härkönen, Per Anders Nilsson, Leena Nurminen & Jukka Horppila
The coexistence of competing species relies on niche partitioning. Competitive exclusion is likely inevitable at high niche overlap, but such divide between competitors may be bridged if environmental circumstances displace competitor niches to enhance partitioning. Foraging-niche dimension can be influenced by environmental characteristics, and if competitors react differently to such conditions, coexistence can be facilitated. We here experimentally approach the partitioning effects of environmental conditions by evaluating the influence of water turbulence on foraging-niche responses...

Data from: A test for within-lake niche differentiation in the nine-spined sticklebacks (Pungitius pungitius)

Federico C. F. Calboli, Pär Byström & Juha Merilä
Specialization for the use of different resources can lead to ecological speciation. Accordingly, there are numerous examples of ecologically specialized pairs of fish “species” in postglacial lakes. Using a polymorphic panel of single nucleotide variants, we tested for genetic footprints of within-lake population stratification in nine-spined sticklebacks (Pungitius pungitius) collected from three habitats (viz. littoral, benthic, and pelagic) within a northern Swedish lake. Analyses of admixture, population structure, and relatedness all supported the conclusion that...

Data from: Strong dispersal in a parasitoid wasp overwhelms habitat fragmentation and host population dynamics

Christelle Couchoux, Perttu Seppä & Saskya Van Nouhuys
The population dynamics of a parasite depend on species traits, host dynamics, and the environment. Those dynamics are reflected in the genetic structure of the population. Habitat fragmentation has a greater impact on parasites than on their hosts because resource distribution is increasingly fragmented for species at higher trophic levels. This could lead to either more or less genetic structure than the host, depending on the relative dispersal rates of species. We examined the spatial...

Data from: Grazed wet meadows are sink habitats for the southern dunlin (Calidris alpina schinzii) due to nest trampling by cattle

Veli-Matti Pakanen, Sami Aikio, Aappo Luukkonen & Kari Koivula
The effect of habitat management is commonly evaluated by measuring population growth, which does not distinguish changes in reproductive success from changes in survival or the effects of immigration or emigration. Management has rarely been evaluated considering complete life cycle of the target organisms, including also possible negative impacts from management. We evaluated the effectiveness of cattle grazing in the restoration of coastal meadows as a breeding habitat for small and medium-sized ground-nesting birds by...

Data from: Impact of male condition on his spermatophore and consequences for female reproductive performance in the Glanville fritillary butterfly

Anne Duplouy, Luisa Woestmann, Juan Gallego-Zamorano, Marjo Saastamoinen & Juan Gallego Zamorano
In butterflies, male reproductive success is highly related to the quality and the size of the spermatophore transferred to the female. The spermatophore is a capsule produced by the male during copulation, which in many species contains sperm in addition to a nuptial gift, and which is digested by the female after copulation. The nuptial gift may contribute to egg production and offspring quality, and in some cases also to female body maintenance. The production...

Data from: Sublethal streptomycin concentrations and lytic bacteriophage together promote resistance evolution

Johannes Cairns, Lutz Becks, Matti Jalasvuori & Teppo Hiltunen
Sub-minimum inhibiting concentrations (sub-MICs) of antibiotics frequently occur in natural environments owing to wide-spread antibiotic leakage by human action. Even though the concentrations are very low, these sub-MICs have recently been shown to alter bacterial populations by selecting for antibiotic resistance and increasing the rate of adaptive evolution. However, studies are lacking on how these effects reverberate into key ecological interactions, such as bacteria–phage interactions. Previously, co-selection of bacteria by phages and antibiotic concentrations exceeding...

Data from: Primary production calculations for sea ice from bio-optical observations in the Baltic Sea

Susann Müller, Anssi V. Vähätalo, Jari Uusikivi, Markus Majaneva, Sanna Majaneva, Riitta Autio & Janne-Markus Rintala
Bio-optics is a powerful approach for estimating photosynthesis rates, but has seldom been applied to sea ice, where measuring photosynthesis is a challenge. We measured absorption coefficients of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), algae, and non-algal particles along with solar radiation, albedo and transmittance at four sea-ice stations in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea. This unique compilation of optical and biological data for Baltic Sea ice was used to build a radiative transfer model...

Data from: Genetic heterogeneity underlying variation in a locally adaptive clinal trait in Pinus sylvestris revealed by a Bayesian multipopulation analysis

Sonja T. Kujala, Timo Knürr, Katri Kärkkäinen, David B. Neale, Mikko J. Sillanpää & Outi Savolainen
Local adaptation is a common feature of plant and animal populations. Adaptive phenotypic traits are genetically differentiated along environmental gradients, but the genetic basis of such adaptation is still poorly known. Genetic association studies of local adaptation combine data over populations. Correcting for population structure in these studies can be problematic since both selection and neutral demographic events can create similar allele frequency differences between populations. Correcting for demography with traditional methods may lead to...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    53

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    53

Affiliations

  • University of Helsinki
    53
  • University of Jyväskylä
    10
  • University of Turku
    4
  • University of Oslo
    3
  • Natural Resources Institute Finland
    3
  • University of Oxford
    3
  • Lund University
    2
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • University of Lausanne
    2
  • Aarhus University
    2