6 Works

Data from: Towards a better understanding of the Chenopodium album aggregate (Amaranthaceae) in the Middle East: a karyological, cytometric and morphometric investigation

Farzaneh Habibi, Petr Vit, Mohammadreza Rahiminejad & Bohumil Mandak
The study of variation in nuclear genome size, especially when combined with common garden experiments, significantly contributes to disentangling interspecies relationships within taxonomically complicated plant groups. The Chenopodium album aggregate is among the morphologically most variable groups and consists of many weakly differentiated cosmopolitan entities. We analysed nuclear genome size variation in diploid and polyploid species of the aggregate from Iran using flow cytometry of 282 accessions from 88 populations of 7 species. To this...

Data from: Fine scale waterbody data improve prediction of waterbird occurrence despite coarse species data

Petra Šímová, Vítězslav Moudrý, Jan Komárek, Karel Hrach & Marie-Josée Fortin
While modelling habitat suitability and species distribution, ecologists must deal with issues related to the spatial resolution of species occurrence and environmental data. Indeed, given that the spatial resolution of species and environmental datasets range from centimeters to hundreds of kilometers, it underlines the importance of choosing the optimal combination of resolutions to achieve the highest possible modelling prediction accuracy. We evaluated how the spatial resolution of land cover/waterbody datasets (meters to 1 km) affect...

Data from: Ramalina sarahae (Ramalinaceae), a new species from the Channel Islands of California, U.S.A.

Kerry Knudsen, James C. Lendemer & Jana Kocourková
Ramalina sarahae is described as new to science and considered to be closely related to the widespread R. lacera. It has a cortex without chondroid strands but differs from R. lacera in having a densely caespitose thallus of thin branches with only pseudocyphellae. The species is considered to be naturally rare, occurring in a small area of San Miguel Island in southern California, and on San Nicolas Island. Currently eight species of Ramalina are known...

Data from: Metabolomic and transcriptomic data on major metabolic/biosynthetic pathways in workers and soldiers of the termite Prorhinotermes simplex (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) and chemical synthesis of intermediates of defensive (E)-nitropentadec-1-ene biosynthesis

Anna Jirošová, Andrej Jančařík, Riya C. Menezes, Olga Bazalová, Klára Dolejšová, Heiko Vogel, Pavel Jedlička, Aleš Buček, Jana Brabcová, Pavel Majer, Robert Hanus & Aleš Svatoš
Production of nitro compounds has only seldom been recorded in arthropods. The aliphatic nitroalkene (E)-nitropentadec-1-ene (NPD), identified in soldiers of the termite genus Prorhinotermes, was the first case documented in insects in early seventies. Yet, the biosynthetic origin of NPD has long remained unknown. We previously proposed that NPD arises through the condensation of amino acids glycine and/or l-serine with tetradecanoic acid along a biosynthetic pathway analogous to the formation of sphingolipids. Here, we provide...

Data from: Crop-to-wild hybridization in cherries – empirical evidence from Prunus fruticosa

Lenka Macková, Petr Vít & Tomas Urfus
Crop cultivation can lead to genetic swamping of indigenous species and thus pose a serious threat for biodiversity. The rare Eurasian tetraploid shrub Prunus fruticosa (ground cherry) is suspected of hybridizing with cultivated allochthonous tetraploid P. cerasus and autochthonous diploid P. avium. Three Prunus taxa (447 individuals of P. fruticosa, 43 of P. cerasus and 73 of P. avium) and their hybrids (198 individuals) were evaluated using analysis of absolute genome size/ploidy level and multivariate...

Data from: Global pattern of nest predation is disrupted by climate change in shorebirds

Vojtěch Kubelka, Miroslav Šálek, Pavel Tomkovich, Zsolt Végvári, Robert P. Freckleton & Tamás Székely
Ongoing climate change is thought to disrupt trophic relationships, with consequences for complex interspecific interactions, yet the effects of climate change on species interactions are poorly understood, and such effects have not been documented at a global scale. Using a single database of 38,191 nests from 237 populations, we found that shorebirds have experienced a worldwide increase in nest predation over the past 70 years. Historically, there existed a latitudinal gradient in nest predation, with...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Czech University of Life Sciences Prague
    6
  • Charles University
    3
  • University of Bath
    1
  • Moscow State University
    1
  • University of Zurich
    1
  • University of Debrecen
    1
  • University of Toronto
    1
  • Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
    1
  • University of Isfahan
    1
  • University of Sheffield
    1