6 Works

Data from: Advanced glycation end products (AGE) and receptor for AGE (RAGE) in patients with active tuberculosis, and their relationship between food intake and nutritional status

Lívia F. Da Silva, Erika C. Skupien, Tássia K. Lazzari, Sizuane R. Holler, Ellis G.C. De Almeida, Luísa R. Zampieri, Sandra E. Coutinho, Michael Andrades & Denise R. Silva
Introduction: The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed in normal lungs and is upregulated during infection. AGEs and RAGE cause oxidative stress and apoptosis in lung cells. The objective of this study is to evaluate levels of AGEs and its soluble receptor (sRAGE), and to investigate their relationship with food intake and nutritional status, in a university-affiliated hospital in Brazil. Methods: Case-control study, from June 2017 to June 2018. AGE (carboxymethyl lysine,...

FragSAD: A database of diversity and species abundance distributions from habitat fragments

Jonathan M. Chase, Mario Liebergesell, Alban Sagouis, Felix May, Shane A. Blowes, Åke Berg, Enrico Bernard, Berry J. Brosi, Marc W. Cadotte, Luis Cayuela, Adriano G. Chiarello, Jean-François Cosson, Will Cresswell, Filibus Danjuma Dami, Jens Dauber, Christopher R. Dickman, Raphael K. Didham, David P. Edwards, Fabio Z. Farneda, Yoni Gavish, Thiago Gonçalves-Souza, Demetrio Luis Guadagnin, Mickaël Henry, Adrià López-Baucells, Heike Kappes … & Yaron Ziv
Habitat destruction is the single greatest anthropogenic threat to biodiversity. Decades of research on this issue have led to the accumulation of hundreds of data sets comparing species assemblages in larger, intact, habitats to smaller, more fragmented, habitats. Despite this, little synthesis or consensus has been achieved, primarily because of non‐standardized sampling methodology and analyses of notoriously scale‐dependent response variables (i.e., species richness). To be able to compare and contrast the results of habitat fragmentation...

Data from: The influence of spatial sampling scales on ant-plant interaction network architecture

Wesley Dáttilo, Jeferson Vizentin-Bugoni, Vanderlei J. Debastiani, Pedro Jordano & Thiago J. Izzo
1.Despite great interest in metrics to quantify the structure of ecological networks, the effects of sampling and scale remain poorly understood. In fact, one of the most challenging issues in ecology is how to define suitable scales (i.e., temporal or spatial) to accurately describe and understand ecological systems. 2.Here, we sampled a series of ant‐plant interaction networks in the southern Brazilian Amazon rainforest in order to determine whether the spatial sampling scale, from local to...

Peregrino: uma análise audiovisual a respeito de Antônio Conselheiro

Pedro Mallmann

Effect of Drought Stress on the Genetic Architecture of Photosynthate Allocation and Remobilization in Pods of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), a Key Species for Food Security

Paul Gepts, Jorge Carlos Berny Mier Y Teran, Enéas R. Konzen, Antonia Palkovic, Siu M. Tsai, Idupulapati M. Rao & Stephen Beebe
Background: Common bean is the most important staple grain legume for direct human consumption and nutrition. It complements major sources of carbohydrates, including cereals, root crop, or plantain, as a source of dietary proteins. It is also a significant source of vitamins and minerals like iron and zinc. To fully play its nutritional role, however, its robustness against stresses needs to be strengthened. Foremost among these is drought, which commonly affects its productivity and seed...

Not a melting pot: plant species aggregate in their non-native range

Gisela C. Stotz, James F. Cahill, Jonathan A. Bennett, Cameron N. Carlyle, Edward W. Bork, Diana Askarizadeh, Sandor Bartha, Carl Beierkuhnlein, Bazartseren Boldgiv, Leslie Brown, Marcelo Cabido, Giandiego Campetella, Stefano Chelli, Ofer Cohen, Sandra Díaz, Lucas Enrico, David Ensing, Batdelger Erdenetsetseg, Alessandra Fidelis, Heath W. Garris, Hugh A.L. Henry, Anke Jentsch, Mohammad Hassan Jouri, Kadri Koorem, Peter Manning … & Lauchlan H. Fraser
Aim: Plant species continue to be moved outside of their native range by human activities. Here, we aim at determining whether, once introduced, plants assimilate into native communities, or whether they aggregate, thus forming mosaics of native- and alien-rich communities. Alien species may aggregate in their non-native range due to shared habitat preferences, such as their tendency to establish in high-biomass, species-poor areas. Location: 22 herbaceous grasslands in 14 countries, mainly in the temperate zone....

Registration Year

  • 2019
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    5
  • Data Paper
    1

Affiliations

  • Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul
    6
  • University of Sao Paulo
    2
  • University of Camerino
    1
  • Oeko Institut
    1
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    1
  • Islamic Azad University
    1
  • Sao Paulo State University
    1
  • University of Jos
    1
  • Universidade do Oeste Paulista
    1
  • University of Pretoria
    1