162 Works

Estudo da Sensibilidade Materna em Díades de Risco Biológico, Ambiental e Acumulado

Ana Serradas, Bárbara Tadeu, helia soares & Marina Fuertes
Inicialmente a sensibilidade materna foi definida como a capacidade da mãe reconhecer os sinais comportamentais da criança, interpretá-los corretamente e responder-lhes pronta e adequadamente (Ainsworth, Bell & Stayton, 1971). Este constructo, por influência das abordagens sistémicas e bioecológicas, evoluiu para um conceito diádico resultante da interação mãe-filho(a). No âmbito desta abordagem foi desenvolvida uma escala diádica de avaliação da qualidade do envolvimento materno e infantil com base na observação de díades portuguesas em jogo livre...

A Importância do Pai na qualidade da autorregulação do bebé

Inês Gonçalves & Marina Fuertes
Os comportamentos e o tipo de autorregulação do bebé observado na relação com figura materna têm sido associados à qualidade da vinculação e do desenvolvimento subsequente. Contudo, a literatura escasseia no que respeita à qualidade destes comportamentos do bebé na interação com o pai. Com o intuito de estudar os processos de autorregulação do bebé e o papel paterno na interação foram observados: 19 bebés entre os 3 e os 9 meses. Os participantes deste...

Perdigão: SRTM raster map

José Laginha Palma, Vasco Batista & Vitor Costa Gomes

Perdigão: computational mesh (ALS.NE.40)

Vasco Batista, José Laginha Palma & Vitor Costa Gomes

Data from: Fine-scale genetic structure reflects sex-specific dispersal strategies in a population of sociable weavers (Philetairus socius)

René E. Van Dijk, Rita Covas, Claire Doutrelant, Claire N. Spottiswoode & Ben J. Hatchwell
Dispersal is a critical driver of gene flow, with important consequences for population genetic structure, social interactions and other biological processes. Limited dispersal may result in kin-structured populations in which kin selection may operate, but it may also increase the risk of kin competition and inbreeding. Here, we use a combination of long-term field data and molecular genetics to examine dispersal patterns and their consequences for the population genetics of a highly social bird, the...

Data from: Multiple quantitative trait loci influence intra-specific variation in genital morphology between phylogenetically distinct lines of Drosophila montana

Martin A Schäfer, Jarkko Routtu, Jorge Vieira, Anneli Hoikkala, Mike G Ritchie & Christian Schlötterer
The evolution of animal genitalia has gained renewed interest, because of their potential roles during sexual selection and early stages of species formation. Although central to understanding the evolutionary process, knowledge of the genetic basis of natural variation in genital morphology is limited to a very few species. Using an out-bred cross between phylogenetically distinct lines of Drosophila montana, we characterized quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting the size and shape of the distiphallus, a prominent...

Data from: Geographic variation of life-history traits in the sand lizard, Lacerta agilis: testing Darwin's fecundity-advantage hypothesis

Evgeny S. Roitberg, Galina V. Eplanova, Tatiana I. Kotenko, Fèlix Amat, Miguel A. Carretero, Valentina N. Kuranova, Nina A. Bulakhova, Oleksandr I. Zinenko & Vladimir A. Yakovlev
The fecundity-advantage-hypothesis (FAH) explains larger female size relative to male size as a correlated response to fecundity selection. We explored FAH by investigating geographic variation in female reproductive output and its relation to sexual size dimorphism (SSD) in Lacerta agilis, an oviparous lizard occupying a major part of temperate Eurasia. We analysed how sex-specific body size and SSD are associated with two putative indicators of fecundity selection intensity (clutch size and the slope of the...

Data from: Phylogeography of the small Indian civet and origin of introductions to western Indian Ocean islands

Philippe Gaubert, Riddhi Patel, Geraldine Veron, Steve M. Goodman, Maraike Willsch, Raquel Vasconcelos, Andre Lourenço, Marie Sigaud, Fabienne Justy, Bheem Dutt Joshi, Joerns Fickel & Abdreas Wilting
The biogeographic dynamics affecting the Indian subcontinent, East and Southeast Asia during the Plio-Pleistocene has generated complex biodiversity patterns. We assessed the molecular biogeography of the small Indian civet (Viverricula indica) through mitogenome and cytochrome b + control region sequencing of 89 historical and modern samples to (i) establish a time-calibrated phylogeography across the species’ native range and (ii) test introduction scenarios to western Indian Ocean islands. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses identified three geographic lineages (East...

Data from: Postglacial range expansion shaped the spatial genetic structure in a marine habitat-forming species: implications for conservation plans in the Eastern Adriatic Sea

Jean-Baptiste Ledoux, Maša Frleta-Valić, Silvija Kipson, Agostinho Antunes, Emma Cebrian, Cristina Linares, Pablo Sánchez, Raphael Leblois & Joaquim Garrabou
Aim: Understanding how historical and contemporary processes shaped and maintain spatial patterns of genetic diversity is a major goal for conservation biologists. Here, we characterized the pattern of neutral genetic diversity and we inferred underlying processes in the habitat-forming octocoral Paramuricea clavata in the Adriatic Sea, a peculiar phylogeographic region of the Mediterranean Sea. Location: Eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea. Methods: We genotyped seven microsatellites in 454 individuals of P. clavata from 13 populations...

Data from: Heat tolerance is more variable than cold tolerance across species of Iberian lizards after controlling for intraspecific variation

Salvador Herrando-Pérez, Camila Monasterio, Wouter Beukema, Verónica Gomes, Francisco Gomes Ferri-Yáñez, Josabel Belliure, Steven L. Chown, Lauren B Buckley, David R. Vieites & Miguel B. Araújo
The widespread observation that heat tolerance is less variable than cold tolerance (‘cold-tolerance asymmetry’) leads to the prediction that species exposed to temperatures near their thermal maxima should have reduced evolutionary potential for adapting to climate warming. However, the prediction is largely supported by species-level global studies based on single estimates of both physiological metrics per taxon. We ask if cold-tolerance asymmetry holds for Iberian lizards after accounting for intraspecific variation in critical thermal maxima...

Data from: Phylogenetic patterns of geographical and ecological diversification in the subgenus Drosophila

Ramiro Morales-Hojas & Jorge Vieira
Colonisation of new geographic regions and/or of new ecological resources can result in rapid species diversification into the new ecological niches available. Members of the subgenus Drosophila are distributed across the globe and show a large diversity of ecological niches. Furthermore, taxonomic classification of Drosophila includes the rank radiation, which refers to closely related species groups. Nevertheless, it has never been tested if these taxonomic radiations correspond to evolutionary radiations. Here we present a study...

Data from: Validating the use of coloration patterns for individual recognition in the worm pipefish using a novel set of microsatellite markers

Nuno M. Monteiro, Rodolfo M. Silva, Mário Cunha, Agostinho Antunes, Adam G. Jones & Maria N. Vieira
In studies of behaviour, ecology and evolution, identification of individual organisms can be an invaluable tool, capable of unravelling otherwise cryptic information regarding group structure, movement patterns, population size and mating strategies. The use of natural markings is arguably the least invasive method for identification. However, to be truly useful natural markings must be sufficiently variable to allow for unique identification, while being stable enough to permit long-term studies. Non-invasive marking techniques are especially important...

Data from: Home loving boreal hare mitochondria survived several invasions in Iberia: the relative roles of recurrent hybridisation and allele surfing

José Melo-Ferreira, Liliana Farelo, Helder Freitas, Franz Suchentrunk, Pierre Boursot & Paulo C. Alves
Genetic introgression from a resident species into an invading close relative can result from repeated hybridisation along the invasion front and/or allele surfing on the expansion wave. Cases where the phenomenon is massive and systematic, such as for hares (genus Lepus) in Iberia, would be best explained by recurrent hybridisation but this is difficult to prove since the donor populations are generally extinct. In the Pyrenean foothills, Lepus europaeus presumably replaced Lepus granatensis recently and...

Data from: The lek mating system of the worm pipefish (Nerophis lumbriciformis): a molecular maternity analysis and test of the phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis

Nuno M. Monteiro, Diana Carneiro, Agostinho Antunes, Nuno Queiroz, Maria N. Vieira & Adam G. Jones
The origin and maintenance of mating preferences continues to be an important and controversial topic in sexual selection research. Leks and lek-like mating systems, where individuals gather in particular spots for the sole purpose of mate choice, are particularly puzzling, because the strong directional selection imposed by mate choice should erode genetic variation among competing individuals and negate any benefit for the choosing sex. Here, we take advantage of the lek-like mating system of the...

Data from: Range expansion underlies historical introgressive hybridization in the Iberian hare

João P. Marques, Liliana Farelo, Joana Vilela, Dan Vanderpool, Paulo C. Alves, Jeffrey M. Good, Pierre Boursot & José Melo-Ferreira
Introgressive hybridization is an important and widespread evolutionary process, but the relative roles of neutral demography and natural selection in promoting massive introgression are difficult to assess and an important matter of debate. Hares from the Iberian Peninsula provide an appropriate system to study this question. In its northern range, the Iberian hare, Lepus granatensis, shows a northwards gradient of increasing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) introgression from the arctic/boreal L. timidus, which it presumably replaced after...

Data from: Interpreting the genomic landscape of speciation: a road map for finding barriers to gene flow

Mark Ravinet, Rui Faria, Roger K. Butlin, Juan Galindo, Nicolas Bierne, Marina Rafajlović, Mohamed A. F. Noor, Bernhard Mehlig & Anja M. Westram
Speciation, the evolution of reproductive isolation amongst populations, is continuous, complex, and involves multiple, interacting barriers. Until it is complete, the effects of this process vary along the genome and can lead to a heterogeneous genomic landscape with peaks and troughs of differentiation and divergence. When gene flow occurs during speciation, barriers restricting migration locally in the genome lead to patterns of heterogeneity. However, genomic heterogeneity can also be produced or modified by variation in...

Data from: Niche evolution and thermal adaptation in the temperate species Drosophila americana

Neftali Sillero, Micael Reis, Cristina P. Vieira, Jorge Vieira, Ramiro Morales Hojas & R. Morales-Hojas
The study of ecological niche evolution is fundamental for understanding how the environment influences species’ geographical distributions and their adaptation to divergent environments. Here we present a study of the ecological niche, demographic history and thermal performance (locomotor activity, developmental time and fertility/viability) of the temperate species Drosophila americana and its two chromosomal forms. Temperature is the environmental factor that contributes most to the species’ and chromosomal forms’ ecological niches, although precipitation is also important...

Data from: Hybridization at an ecotone: ecological and genetic barriers between three Iberian vipers

Pedro Tarroso, Ricardo J. Pereira, Fernando Martínez-Freiría, Raquel Godinho & José Carlos Brito
The formation of stable genetic boundaries between emerging species is often diagnosed by reduced hybrid fitness relative to parental taxa. This reduced fitness can arise from endogenous and/or exogenous barriers to gene flow. Although detecting exogenous barriers in nature is difficult, we can estimate the role of ecological divergence in driving species boundaries by integrating molecular and ecological niche modelling tools. Here, we focus on a three-way secondary contact zone between three viper species (Vipera...

Data from: Bushmeat genetics: setting up a reference framework for the DNA-typing of African forest bushmeat

Philippe Gaubert, Flobert Njiokou, Ayodeji Olayemi, Paolo Pagani, Sylvain Dufour, Emmanuel Danquah, Mac Elikem K. Nutsuakor, Gabriel Ngua, Alain-Didier Missoup, Pablo A. Tedesco, Rémy Dernat & Agostinho Antunes
The bushmeat trade in tropical Africa represents illegal, unsustainable off-takes of millions of tons of wild game – mostly mammals – per year. We sequenced four mitochondrial gene fragments (cyt b, COI, 12S, 16S) in >300 bushmeat items representing nine mammalian orders and 59 morphological species from five western and central African countries (Guinea, Ghana, Nigeria, Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea). Our objectives were to assess the efficiency of cross-species PCR amplification and to evaluate the...

Data from: \"Identification and assessment of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between Culex complex mosquitoes.\" in Genomic Resources Notes Accepted 1 August 2014-30 September 2014

David S. Kang & Cheolho Sim
Culex pipiens complex mosquitoes are important vectors for many human pathogens including West Nile encephalitis, Rift Valley fever and Lymphatic filariasis. In this study we characterized a set of SNP markers between two biotypes of the Culex pipiens complex, Culex pipiens form molestus and Culex pipiens form pipiens, for use in a high-resolution genetic mapping and population genetics. DNA pooled from 10 specimens of each biotype were sequenced and analyzed for variation in 28 genes....

Data from: Antagonistic effect of helpers on breeding male and female survival in a cooperatively breeding bird

Matthieu Paquet, Claire Doutrelant, Ben J. Hatchwell, Claire N. Spottiswoode & Rita Covas
1. Cooperatively breeding species are typically long lived and hence, according to theory, are expected to maximize their lifetime reproductive success through maximizing survival. Under these circumstances, the presence of helpers could be used to lighten the effort of current reproduction for parents to achieve higher survival. 2. In addition, individuals of different sexes and ages may follow different strategies, but whether male and female breeders and individuals of different ages benefit differently from the...

Data from: Behavioural responses of Atlantic cod to sea temperature changes

Carla Freitas, Esben Moland Olsen, Even Moland, Lorenzo Ciannelli & Halvor Knutsen
Understanding responses of marine species to temperature variability is essential to predict impacts of future climate change in the oceans. Most ectotherms are expected to adjust their behavior to avoid extreme temperatures and minimize acute changes in body temperature. However, measuring such behavioral plasticity in the wild is challenging. Combining 4 years of telemetry-derived behavioral data on juvenile and adult (30–80 cm) Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), and in situ ocean temperature measurements, we found a...

Data from: Dopamine disruption increases cleanerfish cooperative investment in novel client partners

Marta C. Soares, Teresa P. Santos & João P.M. Messias
Social familiarization is a process of gaining knowledge that results from direct or indirect participation in social events. Cooperative exchanges are thought to be conditional upon familiarity with others. Indeed, individuals seem to prefer to engage with those that have previously interacted with them, which are more accurate predictors of reward than novel partners. On the other hand, highly social animals do seek novelty. Truth is that the physiological bases underlying how familiarity and novelty...

Data from: A metabolic syndrome in terrestrial ectotherms with different elevational and distribution patterns

Anamarija Žagar, Miguel A. Carretero, Diana Marguč, Tatjana Simčič & Al Vrezec
The metabolic performance of ectotherms is expected to be driven by the environment in which they live. Ecologically similar species with contrasting elevation distributions occurring in sympatry at mid-elevations, provide good models for studying how physiological responses to temperature vary as a function of adaptation to different elevations.. Under sympatry, at middle elevations, where divergent species ranges overlap, sympatric populations are expected to have similar thermal responses, suggesting similar local acclimation or adaptation, while observed...

Data from: The evolutionary history of the Cape hare (Lepus capensis sensu lato): insights for systematics and biogeography

Sara Lado, Paulo C. Alves, M. Zafarul Islam, José C. Brito & José Melo-Ferreira
Inferring the phylogeography of species with large distributions helps deciphering major diversification patterns that may occur in parallel across taxa. Here, we infer the evolutionary history of the Cape hare, Lepus capensis sensu lato, a species distributed from southern Africa to Asia, by analysing variation at 18 microsatellites and 9 DNA (1 mitochondrial and 8 nuclear) sequenced loci, from field and museum-collected samples. Using a combination of assignment and coalescent-based methods, we show that the...

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