11 Works

Data from: Planning for climate change through additions to a national protected area network: implications for cost and configuration

Joshua Lawler, D. Scott Rinnan, Julia Michalak, John Withey & Hugh Possingham
Expanding the network of protected areas is a core strategy for conserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. Here we explore the impacts on reserve network cost and configuration associated with planning for climate change in the United States using networks that prioritize areas projected to be climatically suitable for 1,460 species both today and into the future, climatic refugia, and areas likely to facilitate climate-driven species movements. For 14% of the species, networks...

Data from: Fungal endophyte‐infected leaf litter alters in‐stream microbial communities and negatively influences aquatic fungal sporulation

Emily R. Wolfe, Brett S. Younginger & Carri J. LeRoy
Endophytes are ubiquitous plant‐associated microbes and although they have the potential to alter the decomposition of infected leaf litter, this has not been well‐studied. The endophyte Rhytisma punctatum infects the leaves of Acer macrophyllum (bigleaf maple), causing the appearance of black ‘tar spots’ that persist in senesced leaves. Other foliar fungi also cause visible damage in healthy tissues of this host plant system including an unidentified bullseye‐shaped lesion, common in western Washington. Using three treatments...

Data from: Testing a “genes-to-ecosystems” approach to understanding aquatic-terrestrial linkages

Gregory Crutsinger, Seth Rudman, Mariano Rodriguez-Cabal, Athena Mckown, Takuya Sato, Andrew M. MacDonald, Julian Heavyside, Armando Geraldes, Edmund Hart, Carri LeRoy, Rana El-Sabaawi, Athena D. McKown, Gregory M. Crutsinger, Seth M. Rudman, Mariano A. Rodriguez-Cabal, Edmund M. Hart, Carri J. LeRoy & Rana W. El-Sabaawi
A ‘genes-to-ecosystems’ approach has been proposed as a novel avenue for integrating the consequences of intraspecific genetic variation with the underlying genetic architecture of a species in order to shed light on the relationships among hierarchies of ecological organization (genes [RIGHTWARDS ARROW] individuals [RIGHTWARDS ARROW] communities [RIGHTWARDS ARROW] ecosystems). However, attempts to identify genes with major effect on the structure of communities and/or ecosystem processes have been limited and a comprehensive test of this approach...

Data from: Occupancy patterns and upper range limits of lowland Bornean birds along an elevational gradient

Ryan Burner, Alison Styring, Mustafa Rahman & Frederick Sheldon
Aim: The traditional view of species’ distributions is that they are less abundant near the edges of their ranges and more abundant toward the center. Testing this pattern is difficult because of the complexity of distributions across wide geographical areas. An alternative strategy, however, is to measure species’ distributional patterns along elevational gradients. We applied this strategy to examine whether lowland forest birds are indeed less common near their upper range limits on a Bornean...

Data from: Biotic interactions help explain variation in elevational range limits of birds among Bornean mountains

Ryan C. Burner, Andy J. Boyce, Alison Styring, Tom Martin, David Bernasconi & Frederick Sheldon
Aim Physiological tolerances and biotic interactions along habitat gradients are thought to influence species occurrence. Distributional differences caused by such forces are particularly noticeable on tropical mountains, where high species turnover along elevational gradients occurs over relatively short distances and elevational distributions of particular species can shift among mountains. Such shifts are interpreted as evidence of the importance of spatial variation in interspecific competition and habitat or climatic gradients. To assess the relative importance of...

Data from: Tree genetics strongly affect forest productivity, but intraspecific diversity-productivity relationships do not

Dylan G. Fischer, Gina M. Wimp, Erika Hersch-Green, Randy K. Bangert, Carri J. LeRoy, Joseph K. Bailey, Jennifer A. Schweitzer, Clarissa Dirks, Stephen C. Hart, Gerard J. Allan & Thomas G. Whitham
Numerous studies have demonstrated biodiversity–productivity relationships in plant communities, and analogous genetic diversity–productivity studies using genotype mixtures of single species may show similar patterns. Alternatively, competing individuals among genotypes within a species are less likely to exhibit resource-use complementarity, even when they exhibit large differences in their effects on ecosystem function. In this study, we test the impact of genotype diversity and genetic identity on ecosystem function using an ecosystem-scale common garden experiment. Distinct tree...

Data from: Testing conceptual models of early plant succession across a disturbance gradient

Cynthia C. Chang, Charles B. Halpern, Joseph A. Antos, Meghan L. Avolio, Abir Biswas, James E. Cook, Roger Del Moral, Dylan G. Fischer, Andrés Holz, Robert J. Pabst, Mark E. Swanson & Donald B. Zobel
1.Studies of succession have a long history in ecology, but rigorous tests of general, unifying principles are rare. One barrier to these tests of theory is the paucity of longitudinal studies that span the broad gradients of disturbance severity that characterize large, infrequent disturbances. The cataclysmic eruption of Mount St. Helens (Washington, USA) in 1980 produced a heterogeneous landscape of disturbance conditions, including primary to secondary successional habitats, affording a unique opportunity to explore how...

Symbiotic moss-cyanobacteria associations as a novel source of biological N2-fixation in temperate grasslands

Lalita Calabria, Kate Peterson, Amanda Bidwell & Sarah Hamman
Aims. Terrestrial mosses contribute significantly to nitrogen budgets in boreal forests through symbiotic associations with N2-fixing cyanobacteria, but few studies have considered these interactions in temperate systems. We investigated how N2-fixation by moss-cyanobacterial associations contribute spatio-temporally to site-level N dynamics in a western North American prairie ecosystem. Methods. We first tested for the presence of N2-fixing cyanobacteria on six moss species using epi-fluorescence light microscopy. We then used an acetylene reduction assay to estimate monthly...

Data from: Understory succession after burial by tephra from Mount St. Helens

Dylan G. Fischer, Joseph A. Antos, Abir Biswas & Donald B. Zobel
1. Successional change following disturbance is a fundamental ecological process that remains central to understanding patterns in plant ecology. Although succession has been studied for well over a century, understanding of the patterns and processes of change is still inadequate, partly because of the dearth of long-term studies. 2. Here, we use, as a model system, a volcanic disturbance that is widespread and of global relevance. We examine succession in old-growth conifer forest understories following...

Data from: Genetic and phenotypic variation across a hybrid zone between ecologically divergent tree squirrels (Tamiasciurus)

Andreas S Chavez, Carl J Saltzberg & G J Kenagy
A hybrid zone along an environmental gradient should contain a clinal pattern of genetic and phenotypic variation. This occurs because divergent selection in the two parental habitats is typically strong enough to overcome the homogenizing effects of gene flow across the environmental transition. We studied hybridization between two parapatric tree squirrels (Tamiasciurus spp.) across a forest gradient over which the two species vary in coloration, cranial morphology, and body size. We sampled 397 individuals at...

Data from: Genetic and phenotypic variation across a hybrid zone between ecologically divergent tree squirrels (Tamiasciurus)

Andreas S Chavez, Carl J Saltzberg & G J Kenagy
A hybrid zone along an environmental gradient should contain a clinal pattern of genetic and phenotypic variation. This occurs because divergent selection in the two parental habitats is typically strong enough to overcome the homogenizing effects of gene flow across the environmental transition. We studied hybridization between two parapatric tree squirrels (Tamiasciurus spp.) across a forest gradient over which the two species vary in coloration, cranial morphology, and body size. We sampled 397 individuals at...

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