23 Works

Data from: Phylogenetic community structure of North American desert bats: influence of environment at multiple spatial and taxonomic scales

Lorelei E. Patrick & Richard D. Stevens
1. Numerous processes influence community structure. The relative importance of these processes are thought to vary with spatial, temporal, and taxonomic scale: density dependent interactions are thought to be most influential at small scales, at intermediate scales environmental conditions may be the most influential factor, and biogeographic processes are thought to be of greater importance at larger scales. Additionally, the stress-dominance hypothesis suggests that communities experiencing harsher environmental conditions will be predominantly structured by habitat...

Data from: Adaptation to climate change: trade-offs among responses to multiple stressors in an intertidal crustacean

Morgan W. Kelly, Melissa B. DeBiasse, Vidal A. Villela, Hope L. Roberts & Colleen F. Cecola
Trade-offs may influence both physiological and evolutionary responses to co-occurring stressors, but their effects on both plastic and adaptive responses to climate change are poorly understood. To test for genetic and physiological trade-offs incurred in tolerating multiple stressors, we hybridized two populations of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus that were divergent for both heat and salinity tolerance. Starting in the F2 generation, we selected for increased tolerance of heat, low salinity, and high salinity in...

Data from: Hidden histories of gene flow in highland birds revealed with genomic markers

Eugenia Zarza, Brant C. Faircloth, Whitney L. E. Tsai, , John Klicka, John E. McCormack, Whitney L.E. Tsai & Robert W. Bryson
Genomic studies are revealing that divergence and speciation are marked by gene flow, but it is not clear whether gene flow has played a prominent role during the generation of biodiversity in species-rich regions of the world where vicariance is assumed to be the principal mode by which new species form. We revisit a well-studied organismal system in the Mexican Highlands, Aphelocoma jays, to test for gene flow among Mexican sierras. Prior results from mitochondrial...

Data from: Local endemism and within-island diversification of shrews illustrate the importance of speciation in building Sundaland mammal diversity

Terrence C. Demos, Anang S. Achmadi, Thomas C. Giarla, Heru Handika, , Kevin C. Rowe & Jacob A. Esselstyn
Island systems are important models for evolutionary biology because they provide convenient, discrete biogeographic units of study. Continental islands with a history of intermittent dry land connections confound the discrete definitions of islands and have led zoologists to predict (1) little differentiation of terrestrial organisms among continental shelf islands and (2) extinction, rather than speciation, to be the main cause of differences in community composition among islands. However, few continental island systems have been subjected...

Data from: Population structure and phylogeography of the Gentoo Penguin (Pygoscelis papua) across the Scotia Arc

Hila Levy, Gemma V. Clucas, Alex D. Rogers, Adam D. Leaché, Kate L. Ciborowski, Michael J. Polito, Heather J. Lynch, Michael J. Dunn & Tom Hart
Climate change, fisheries pressure on penguin prey, and direct human disturbance of wildlife have all been implicated in causing large shifts in the abundance and distribution of penguins in the Southern Ocean. Without mark-recapture studies, understanding how colonies form and, by extension, how ranges shift is challenging. Genetic studies, particularly focused on newly established colonies, provide a snapshot of colonisation and can reveal the extent to which shifts in abundance and occupancy result from changes...

Data from: Biogeography of a plant invasion: genetic variation and plasticity in latitudinal clines for traits related to herbivory

Ganesh P. Bhattarai, Laura A. Meyerson, Jack Anderson, David Cummings, Warwick J. Allen & James T. Cronin
The juxtaposition of plant-species invasions with latitudinal gradients in herbivore pressure is an important yet mostly unexplored issue in invasion biology. Latitudinal clines in defense and palatability to herbivores are expected to exist in native plant species but the evolution of these clines may lag behind for invasive plant species resulting in non-parallel latitudinal clines that may impact invasion success. Our study focused on a native and European invasive lineages of the common reed Phragmites...

Data from: Shared phylogeographical breaks in a Caribbean coral reef sponge and its invertebrate commensals

Melissa B. DeBiasse, Vincent P. Richards, Mahmood S. Shivji & Michael E. Hellberg
Aim: To test whether phylogeographical barriers in the brooding sponge Callyspongia vaginalis match breaks previously identified in the Caribbean. We also compared patterns of subdivision in the sponge to those of three of its commensals, the broadcast spawning brittle star Ophiothrix suensonii and the brooding amphipods Leucothoe ashleyae and L. kensleyi, and tested whether any shared breaks arose simultaneously. Location: Florida, Bahamas and the Caribbean. Methods: Subdivision of C. vaginalis populations was inferred from one...

Data from: Phylogeography and species delimitation in convict cichlids (Cichlidae: Amatitlania): implications for taxonomy and Plio–Pleistocene evolutionary history in Central America

Justin C. Bagley, Wilfredo A. Matamoros, Caleb D. McMahan, Michael Tobler, Prosanta Chakrabarty & Jerald B. Johnson
We investigate phylogeographic patterns and delimit species boundaries within Amatitlania, a genus of Central American cichlid fishes. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequences from 318 individuals spanning the geographical ranges of all three currently recognized Amatitlania species strongly supported one major clade, with a relatively diverged subclade corresponding to A. kanna samples from eastern Costa Rica and Panama. Gene trees and networks revealed marked incongruences between phylogeographic structure and morpho-species taxonomy as a result of...

Data from: Asynchronous demographic responses to Pleistocene climate change in Eastern Nearctic vertebrates

Frank T. Burbrink, Yvonne L. Chan, Edwards A. Myers, Sara Ruane, Brian T. Smith & Michael J. Hickerson
Pleistocene climatic cycles altered species distributions in the Eastern Nearctic of North America, yet the degree of congruent demographic response to the Pleistocene among codistributed taxa remains unknown. We use a hierarchical approximate Bayesian computational approach to test if population sizes across lineages of snakes, lizards, turtles, mammals, birds, salamanders and frogs in this region expanded synchronously to Late Pleistocene climate changes. Expansion occurred in 75% of 74 lineages, and of these, population size trajectories...

Data from: Behavioral response to song and genetic divergence in two subspecies of white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys)

Sara E. Lipshutz, Isaac A. Overcast, Michael J. Hickerson, Robb T. Brumfield & Elizabeth P. Derryberry
Divergence in sexual signals may drive reproductive isolation between lineages, but behavioral barriers can weaken in contact zones. Here, we investigate the role of song as a behavioral and genetic barrier in a contact zone between two subspecies of white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys). We employed a reduced genomic dataset to assess population structure and infer the history underlying divergence, gene flow and hybridization. We also measured divergence in song and tested behavioral responses to song...

Data from: The biogeography of sodium in Neotropical figs (Moraceae)

Adriana Bravo & Kyle E. Harms
Sodium is essential for animals but not for most plants. Terrestrial sodium comes largely from marine aerosols, so inland ecosystems should have greater potential for sodium limitation than coastal ecosystems. We report a significant decrease of sodium in fruits of four Neotropical Ficus species with distance from presumed marine source.

Data from: RADcap: sequence capture of dual-digest RADseq libraries with identifiable duplicates and reduced missing data

Sandra L. Hoffberg, Troy J. Kieran, Julian M. Catchen, Alison Devault, Brant C. Faircloth, Rodney Mauricio & Travis C. Glenn
Molecular ecologists seek to genotype hundreds to thousands of loci from hundreds to thousands of individuals at minimal cost per sample. Current methods, such as restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) and sequence capture, are constrained by costs associated with inefficient use of sequencing data and sample preparation. Here, we introduce RADcap, an approach that combines the major benefits of RADseq (low cost with specific start positions) with those of sequence capture (repeatable sequencing of...

Data from: The negative effects of pathogen-infected prey on predators: a meta-analysis

Andrew J. Flick, Miguel A. Acevedo & Bret D. Elderd
Intra-guild predation (IGP) – where a top predator (IGPred) consumes both a basal resource and a competitor for that resource (IGPrey) – has become a fundamental part of understanding species interactions and community dynamics. IGP communities composed of intraguild predators and prey have been well studied; however, we know less about IGP communities composed of predators, pathogens, and resources. Resource quality plays an important role in community dynamics and may influence IGP dynamics as well....

Data from: High phylogenetic utility of an ultraconserved element probe set designed for Arachnida

James Starrett, Shahan Derkarabetian, Marshal Hedin, , John E. McCormack, Brant C. Faircloth & Robert W. Bryson
Arachnida is an ancient, diverse, and ecologically important animal group that contains a number of species of interest for medical, agricultural, and engineering applications. Despite their importance, many aspects of the arachnid tree of life remain unresolved, hindering comparative approaches to arachnid biology. Biologists have made considerable efforts to resolve the arachnid phylogeny; yet, limited and challenging morphological characters, as well as a dearth of genetic resources, have hindered progress. Here, we present a genomic...

Data from: Adaptation to heat stress reduces phenotypic and transcriptional plasticity in a marine copepod

Morgan W. Kelly, M. Sabrina Pankey, Melissa B. DeBiasse & David C. Plachetzki
Organisms may respond to changing environments through phenotypic plasticity or adaptive evolution. These two processes are not mutually exclusive and may either dampen or strengthen each other's effects, depending on the genetic correlation between trait values and the slopes of their norms of reaction. To examine the effect of adaptation to heat stress on the plasticity of heat tolerance, we hybridized populations of the crustacean Tigriopus californicus that show divergent phenotypes for heat tolerance. We...

Data from: Combining citizen science species distribution models and stable isotopes reveals migratory connectivity in the secretive Virginia rail

Auriel M. V. Fournier, Alexis R. Sullivan, Joseph K. Bump, Marie Perkins, Mark C. Shieldcastle & Sammy L. King
Stable hydrogen isotope (δD) methods for tracking animal movement are widely used yet often produce low resolution assignments. Incorporating prior knowledge of abundance, distribution or movement patterns can ameliorate this limitation, but data are lacking for most species. We demonstrate how observations reported by citizen scientists can be used to develop robust estimates of species distributions and to constrain δD assignments. We developed a Bayesian framework to refine isotopic estimates of migrant animal origins conditional...

Data from: The effect of demographic correlations on the stochastic population dynamics of perennial plants

Aldo Compagnoni, Andrew J. Bibian, Brad M. Ochocki, Haldre S. Rogers, Emily L. Schultz, Michelle E. Sneck, Bret D. Elderd, Amy M. Iler, David W. Inouye, Hans Jacquemyn, Tom E.X. Miller & Tom E. X. Miller
Understanding the influence of environmental variability on population dynamics is a fundamental goal of ecology. Theory suggests that, for populations in variable environments, temporal correlations between demographic vital rates (e.g., growth, survival, reproduction) can increase (if positive) or decrease (if negative) the variability of year-to-year population growth. Because this variability generally decreases long-term population viability, vital rate correlations may importantly affect population dynamics in stochastic environments. Despite long-standing theoretical interest, it is unclear whether vital...

Data from: Physiological plasticity and local adaptation to elevated pCO2 in calcareous algae: an ontogenetic and geographic approach

Jacqueline L. Padilla-Gamiño, Juan D. Gaitán-Espitia, Morgan W. Kelly & Gretchen E. Hofmann
To project how ocean acidification will impact biological communities in the future, it is critical to understand the potential for local adaptation and the physiological plasticity of marine organisms throughout their entire life cycle, as some stages may be more vulnerable than others. Coralline algae are ecosystem engineers that play significant functional roles in oceans worldwide, and are considered vulnerable to ocean acidification. Using different stages of coralline algae, we tested the hypothesis that populations...

Data from: Population genetic inferences using immune gene SNPs mirror patterns inferred by microsatellites

Jean P. Elbers, Rachel W. Clostio & Sabrina S. Taylor
Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are replacing microsatellites for population genetic analyses, but it is not apparent how many SNPs are needed or how well SNPs correlate with microsatellites. We used data from the gopher tortoise, Gopherus polyphemus—a species with small populations, to compare SNPs and microsatellites to estimate population genetic parameters. Specifically, we compared one SNP data set (16 tortoises from four populations sequenced at 17 901 SNPs) to two microsatellite data sets, a full...

Data from: Repeated evolution of carnivory among Indo-Australian rodents

Kevin C. Rowe, Anang S. Achmadi & Jacob A. Esselstyn
Convergent evolution, often observed in island archipelagos, provides compelling evidence for the importance of natural selection as a generator of species and ecological diversity. The Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA) is the world's largest island system and encompasses distinct biogeographic units, including the Asian (Sunda) and Australian (Sahul) continental shelves, which together bracket the oceanic archipelagos of the Philippines and Wallacea. Each of these biogeographic units houses numerous endemic rodents in the family Muridae. Carnivorous murids, i.e.,...

Data from: Sequence capture and next-generation sequencing of ultraconserved elements in a large-genome salamander

Catherine E. Newman & Christopher C. Austin
Amidst the rapid advancement in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology over the last few years, salamanders have been left behind. Salamanders have enormous genomes – up to 40 times the size of the human genome – and this poses challenges to generating NGS data sets of quality and quantity similar to those of other vertebrates. However, optimization of laboratory protocols is time-consuming and often cost prohibitive, and continued omission of salamanders from novel phylogeographic research is...

Data from: Re-evaluating the geological evidence for Late Holocene marine incursion events along the Guerrero Seismic Gap on the Pacific Coast of Mexico

Thomas A. Bianchette, Terrence A. McCloskey & Kam-Biu Liu
Despite the large number of tsunamis that impact Mexico's Pacific coast, stratigraphic studies focusing on geological impacts are scanty, making it difficult to assess the long-term risks for this vulnerable region. Surface samples and six cores were taken from Laguna Mitla near Acapulco to examine sedimentological and geochemical evidence for marine incursion events. Sediment cores collected from behind the beach barrier are dominated by intercalated layers of peat and inorganic sediments, mostly silt and clay,...

Data from: Pyrogenic fuels produced by savanna trees can engineer humid savannas

William J. Platt, Darin P. Ellair, Jean M. Huffman, Stephen E. Potts & Brian Beckage
Natural fires ignited by lightning strikes following droughts frequently are posited as the ecological mechanism maintaining discontinuous tree cover and grass-dominated ground layers in savannas. Such fires, however, may not reliably maintain humid savannas. Pyrogenic shed leaves of savanna trees, however, might engineer fire characteristics in ways that maintain humid savannas through effects on ground layer plants. We explored our hypothesis in a high-rainfall, frequently-burned pine savanna in which the dominant tree, longleaf pine (Pinus...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    23

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    23

Affiliations

  • Louisiana State University of Alexandria
    22
  • Louisiana State University
    6
  • University of Washington
    4
  • City University of New York
    2
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    2
  • Occidental College
    2
  • American Museum of Natural History
    2
  • Michigan Technological University
    1
  • Rice University
    1
  • University of California System
    1