14 Works

How climate impacts the composition of wolf killed-elk in northern Yellowstone National Park

Christopher Wilmers, Matthew Metz, Daniel Stahler, Michel Kohl, Chris Geremia & Douglas Smith
1. While the functional response of predators is commonly measured, recent work has revealed that the age and sex composition of prey killed is often a better predictor of prey population dynamics because the reproductive value of adult females is usually higher than that of males or juveniles. 2. Climate is often an important mediating factor in determining the composition of predator kills, but we currently lack a mechanistic understanding of how the multiple facets...

A comprehensive anatomical and phylogenetic evaluation of Dilophosaurus wetherilli (Dinosauria: Theropoda) with descriptions of new specimens from the Kayenta Formation of northern Arizona

Adam Marsh & Timothy Rowe
Dilophosaurus wetherilli was the largest animal known to have lived on land in North America during the Early Jurassic. Despite its charismatic presence in pop culture and dinosaurian phylogenetic analyses, major aspects of the skeletal anatomy, taxonomy, ontogeny, and evolutionary relationships of this dinosaur remain unknown. Skeletons of this species were collected from the middle and lower part of the Kayenta Formation in the Navajo Nation of Arizona. Redescription of the holotype, referred, and previously...

Repeated fire shifts carbon and nitrogen cycling by changing plant inputs and soil decomposition across ecosystems

Adam Francis Pellegrini, Sarah Hobbie, Peter Reich, Ari Jumpponen, Jack Brookshire, Anthony Caprio, Corli Coetsee & Robert Jackson
Fires shape the biogeochemistry and functioning of many ecosystems, and fire frequencies are changing across much of the globe. Frequent fires can change soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) storage by altering the quantity and chemistry of plant inputs through changes in plant biomass and composition as well as altering decomposition of soil organic matter. How decomposition rates change with shifting inputs remains uncertain because most studies focus on the effects of single fires, where...

Ecosystem services enhanced through soundscape management link people and wildlife

Mitch Levenhagen, Zachary Miller, Alissa Petrelli, Lauren Ferguson, Yau-Huo Shr, Dylan Gomes, Derrick Taff, Crow White, Kurt Fristrup, Christopher Monz, Christopher McClure, Peter Newman, Clinton Francis & Jesse Barber
Burgeoning urbanization, development and human activities have led to reduced opportunities for nature experience in quiet acoustic environments. Increasing noise affects both humans and wildlife alike. We experimentally altered human-caused sound levels in a paired study using informational signs that encouraged quiet behaviours in week-on, week-off blocks on the trail system of Muir Woods National Monument, California, USA to test if the soundscape influences both wildlife and human experiences. Using continuous measurements from acoustic recording...

Sensory pollutants alter bird phenology and fitness across a continent

Clinton Francis, Masayuki Senzaki, Jesse Barber, Jenny Phillips, Neil Carter, Caren Cooper, Mark Ditmer, Kurt Fristrup, Christopher McClure, Daniel Mennitt, Luke Tyrrell, Jelena Vukomanovic & Ashley Wilson
Expansion of anthropogenic noise and night-lighting across our planet is of increasing conservation concern Despite growing knowledge of physiological and behavioural responses to these stimuli from single-species and local-scale studies, whether these pollutants affect fitness is less clear, as is how and why species vary in their sensitivity to these anthropic stressors. Here, we leverage a large citizen science dataset paired with high-resolution noise and light data from across the contiguous United States to assess...

Data from: Acoustically advertising male harbour seals in southeast Alaska do not make biologically relevant acoustic adjustments in the presence of vessel noise

Leanna P. Matthews, Michelle E. H. Fournet, Christine Gabriele, Susan E. Parks & Holger Klinck
Aquatically breeding harbour seal (Phoca vitulina) males use underwater vocalizations during the breeding season to establish underwater territories, defend territories against intruder males, and possibly to attract females. Vessel noise overlaps in frequency with these vocalizations and could negatively impact breeding success by limiting communication space. In this study we investigated whether harbour seals employed anti-masking strategies to maintain communication in the presence of vessel noise in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska. Harbour...

Genetic diversity of Shaw's agave and soil associated microbes in Southern California preserve

Goran Bozinovic, Jeanne Vu, Miguel Vasquez & Keith Lombardo
Shaw’s Agave (Agave shawii ssp. shawii) is an endangered maritime succulent growing along the coast of California and Northern Baja California. The population inhabiting Point Loma Peninsula has a complicated history of transplantation without documentation. The low effective population size in California prompted agave transplanting from the U.S. Naval base site (NB) to Cabrillo National Monument (CNM). Since 2008, there are no agave sprouts identified on the CNM site, and concerns have been raised about...

Data from - Ecological insights from three decades of animal movement tracking across a changing Arctic

Gil Bohrer, Sarah Davidson, Eliezer Gurarie, Scott LaPoint, Peter Mahoney, Emma Grier, Ophélie Couriot, Allicia Kelly, Bryan Bedrosian, Jerrold Belant, Travis Booms, Bridget Borg, Stan Boutin, Erica Craig, Tracy Davison, Robert Domenech, James Hodson, Kyle Joly, Nicholas Larter, A. David M. Latham, Stephen Lewis, Carol McIntyre, Tricia Miller, Kelsey Russell, Dale Seip … & Judy Williams
We provide here the data used in analysis of 3 test cases, presented in the manuscript "Ecological insights from three decades of animal movement tracking across a changing Arctic". We utilized the new Arctic Animal Movement Archive (AAMA), a growing collection of 201 standardized terrestrial and marine animal tracking studies from 1991–present. The AAMA supports public data discovery, preserves fundamental baseline data for the future, and facilitates efficient, collaborative data analysis. With three AAMA-based case...

Stepping into the past to conserve the future: archived skin swabs from extant and extirpated populations inform genetic management of an endangered amphibian

Andrew P. Rothstein, Roland A. Knapp, Gideon Bradburd, Daniel M. Boiano, Cheryl J. Briggs & Erica Bree Rosenblum
Moving animals on a landscape through translocations and reintroductions is an important management tool used in the recovery of endangered species, particularly for the maintenance of population genetic diversity and structure. Management of imperiled amphibian species rely heavily on translocations and reintroductions, especially for species that have been brought to the brink of extinction by the fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. One striking example of disease-related declines and associated management efforts is in California’s Sequoia and...

Extending the footprint record of Pareiasauromorpha to the Cisuralian: earlier appearance and wider palaeobiogeography of the group

Lorenzo Marchetti, Sebastian Voigt, Eudald Mujal, Spencer Lucas, Heitor Francischini, Josep Fortuny & Vincent Santucci
Pareiasauromorpha is one of the most important tetrapod groups of the Permian. Skeletal evidence suggests a late Kungurian origin in North America, whereas the majority of occurrences come from the Guadalupian and Lopingian of South Africa and Russia. Pareiasauromorpha footprints include the ichnogenus Pachypes, that is, however, unknown from strata older than late Guadalupian. A revision of several Pachypes-like footprints from the Cisuralian–Guadalupian of Europe and North America confirm the occurrence of this ichnogenus and...

Invasive grass (Microstegium vimineum) indirectly benefits spider community by subsidizing available prey

Andrew Landsman, Karin Burghardt & Jacob Bowman
1. Invasive plant species cause a suite of direct, negative ecological impacts, but subsequent, indirect effects are more complex and difficult to detect. Where identified, indirect effects to other taxa can be wide-ranging and include ecological benefits in certain habitats or locations. 2. Here, we simultaneously examine the direct and indirect effects of a common, invasive grass species (Microstegium vimineum) on the invertebrate communities of understory deciduous forests in the eastern United States. To do...

Data from: Little giants: a rapidly invading seagrass alters ecosystem functioning relative to native foundation species

Ranjan Muthukrishnan, Kelcie L. Chiquillo, Candice Cross, Peggy Fong, Thomas Kelley, C. Anna Toline, Regina Zweng & Demian A. Willette
The spread of invasive species is a major component of global ecological change and how and when to manage particular species is a diicult empirical question. Ideally, these decisions should be based on the speciic impacts of invading species including both their efects on native competitors and how they may or may not play similar roles in broader ecosystem functioning. Halophila stipulacea is an invasive seagrass currently spreading through the Caribbean, and as seagrasses are...

Evaluating multiple historical climate products in ecological models under current and projected temperatures

Giancarlo Sadoti, Stephanie McAfee, E. Nicklen, Pamela Sousanes & Carl Roland
Gridded historical climate products (GHCPs) are employed with increasing frequency when modeling ecological phenomena across large scales and predicting ecological responses to projected climate changes. Concurrently, there is an increasing acknowledgement of the need to account for uncertainty when employing climate projections from ensembles of global circulation models (GCMs) and emissions scenarios. Despite the growing usage and documented differences among GHCPs, uncertainty characterization has primarily focused on the roles of GCM and emissions scenario choice,...

Wolves choose ambushing locations to counter and capitalize on the sensory abilities of their prey

Thomas Gable, Austin Homkes, Sean Johnson-Bice, Steve Windels & Joseph Bump
Wolves (Canis lupus) are primarily cursorial predators, but they use ambush strategies to hunt beavers (Castor canadensis). Terrestrial beaver activity is predictable because beavers use well-defined, conspicuous habitat features repeatedly. Thus, studying where wolves wait-in-ambush for beavers provides a unique opportunity to understand how predators choose ambush locations in relation to prey activity. We searched 11,817 clusters of GPS-locations from wolves in the Greater Voyageurs Ecosystem, Minnesota, USA and documented 748 ambushing sites and 214...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • National Park Service
    14
  • California Polytechnic State University
    2
  • Utah State University
    2
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • Boise State University
    2
  • University of Maryland, College Park
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • University of Montana
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • Stanford University
    1