125 Works

Survey data of scientists on knowledge exchange in critical zone and geoscience

Y. Zheng, L.A Naylor, S. Waldron & D.M. Oliver
Survey data on knowledge exchange experience of both Chinese and British scientists working on critical zone and more broadly on geoscience. Data are drawn from questionnaire surveys to explore the knowledge management methods used in their environmental research. Data are anonymised social survey data from questionnaires. The data were generated during the NERC grant 'The transmissive critical zone: understanding the karst hydrology-biogeochemical interface for sustainable management' reference NE/N007425/1 undertaken as part of the NERC Using...

Literature review of knowledge management across the environment-policy interface in China

Y. Zheng, L.A. Naylor, S. Waldron & D.M. Oliver
Data from literature search systematically conducted using two widely-used academic databases: Web of Science™ (WoS) and Scopus . Data include the annual amount of KM publication in China and across the world, in WoS, the total amount of knowledge management (KM) publication during the searched years for each country (top 20), in Scopus, the total amount of KM publication during the searched years for each country (top 20), information about the retained KM publication for...

Vegetation and habitat data for fragmented and continuous forest sites in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, 2017

E.H. Waddell, S. Fleiss, B. Bala Ola, A. Bin Sailim, A. Jelling, K.L. Yeong, J. Tangah, S. Benedick, H. King, M. Hughes, C.J. McClean, D.S. Chapman, J.K. Hill & L.F. Banin
This dataset contains records for vegetation in 49 plots across 14 fragmented forest sites and 4 continuous forest sites in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. Living vegetation and deadwood were surveyed in two or three 0.28-ha plots in each of the 18 sites. In addition to vegetation data, the dataset contains topsoil parameters, measurements of forest structure, and metrics of the degree of forest fragmentation in the landscape surrounding the plots. These data were collected in order...

Noachian Bedrock at Endeavour Crater: Data Tables, Statistical Modeling and Locator Images

David Mittlefehldt, Ralf Gellert, Scott VanBommel, Raymond Arvidson, James W. Ashley, Benton Clark, Larry S. Crumpler, William H. Farrand, Matthew Golombek, John Grant, Richard Morris & Christian Schröder

Data from: Strongly asymmetric hybridization barriers shape the origin of a new polyploid species and its hybrid ancestor

Mario Vallejo-Marin, Arielle M. Cooley, Michelle Yuequi Lee, Madison Folmer, Michael R. McKain & Joshua Robert Puzey
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Hybridization between diploids and tetraploids can lead to new allopolyploid species, often via a triploid intermediate. Viable triploids are often produced asymmetrically, with greater success observed for “maternal-excess” crosses where the mother has a higher ploidy than the father. Here we investigated the evolutionary origins of Mimulus peregrinus, an allohexaploid recently derived from the triploid M. ×robertsii, to determine whether reproductive asymmetry has shaped the formation of this new species. METHODS:...

Data from: Evidence for selection-by-environment but not genotype-by-environment interactions for fitness-related traits in a wild mammal population

Adam Hayward, Josephine Pemberton, Camillo Berenos, Alastair J. Wilson, Jill G. Pilkington, Loeske E.B. Kruuk, Josephine M. Pemberton & Adam D. Hayward
How do environmental conditions influence selection and genetic variation in wild populations? There is widespread evidence for selection-by-environment interactions (S*E), but we reviewed studies of natural populations estimating the extent of genotype-by-environment interactions (G*E) in response to natural variation in environmental conditions, and found that evidence for G*E appears to be rare within single populations in the wild. Studies estimating the simultaneous impact of environmental variation on both selection and genetic variation are especially scarce....

Data from: Wide variation in spatial genetic structure between natural populations of the European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and its implications for SGS comparability

Alistair S. Jump, Laura Rico, Marta Coll & Josep Peñuelas
Identification and quantification of spatial genetic structure (SGS) within populations remains a central element of understanding population structure at the local scale. Understanding such structure can inform on aspects of the species' biology, such as establishment patterns and gene dispersal distance, in addition to sampling design for genetic resource management and conservation. However, recent work has identified that variation in factors such as sampling methodology, population characteristics, and marker system can all lead to significant...

Data from: Global biogeography of mating system variation in seed plants

David A. Moeller, Ryan D. Briscoe Runquist, Annika M. Moe, Monica A. Geber, Carol Goodwillie, Pierre-Olivier Cheptou, Christopher G. Eckert, Elizabeth Elle, Mark O. Johnston, Susan Kalisz, Richard H. Ree, Risa D. Sargent, Mario Vallejo-Marin & Alice A. Winn
Latitudinal gradients in biotic interactions have been suggested as causes of global patterns of biodiversity and phenotypic variation. Plant biologists have long speculated that outcrossing mating systems are more common at low than high latitudes owing to a greater predictability of plant–pollinator interactions in the tropics; however, these ideas have not previously been tested. Here, we present the first global biogeographic analysis of plant mating systems based on 624 published studies from 492 taxa. We...

Data from: Tree mortality across biomes is promoted by drought intensity, lower wood density and higher specific leaf area

Sarah Greenwood, Paloma Ruiz-Benito, Jordi Martínez-Vilalta, Francisco Lloret, Thomas Kitzberger, Craig D. Allen, Rod Fensham, Daniel C. Laughlin, Jens Kattge, Gerhard Bonisch, Nathan J. B. Kraft & Alistair S. Jump
Drought events are increasing globally, and reports of consequent forest mortality are widespread. However, due to a lack of a quantitative global synthesis, it is still not clear whether drought-induced mortality rates differ among global biomes and whether functional traits influence the risk of drought-induced mortality. To address these uncertainties, we performed a global meta-analysis of 58 studies of drought-induced forest mortality. Mortality rates were modelled as a function of drought, temperature, biomes, phylogenetic and...

Changes in tree community structures in defaunated forests are not driven only by dispersal limitation

Kirstie Hazelwood, C. E. Timothy Paine, Fernando H. Cornejo-Valverde, Elizabeth G. Pringle, Harald Beck & John Terborgh
1. Bushmeat hunting has reduced population sizes of large frugivorous vertebrates throughout the tropics, thereby reducing the dispersal of seeds. This is believed to affect tree population dynamics, and therefore community composition, because the seed dispersal of large-seeded trees depends upon large-bodied vertebrates. 2. We report on a long-running study of the effect of defaunation on a tropical tree community. In three censuses over 11 years, we compared sapling recruitment between a hunted and a...

Tree diversity is key for promoting the diversity and abundance of forest‐associated taxa in Europe

Eric Allan, Evy Ampoorter, Luc Barbaro, Hervé Jactel, Lander Baeten, Johanna Boberg, Monique Carnol, Bastien Castagneyrol, Yohan Charbonnier, Seid Muhie Dawud, Marc Deconchat, Pallieter De Smedt, Hans De Wandeler, Virginie Guyot, Stephan Hättenschwiler, François‐Xavier Joly, Julia Koricheva, Harriet Milligan, Bart Muys, Diem Nguyen, Sophia Ratcliffe, Karsten Raulund‐Rasmussen, Michael Scherer‐Lorenzen, Fons Plas, J. Van Keer … & Lars Vesterdal
Plant diversity is an important driver of diversity at other trophic levels, suggesting that cascading extinctions could reduce overall biodiversity. Most evidence for positive effects of plant diversity comes from grasslands. Despite the fact that forests are hotspots of biodiversity, the importance of tree diversity, in particular its relative importance compared to other management related factors, in affecting forest‐associated taxa is not well known. To address this, we used data from 183 plots, located in...

Spatial heterogeneity and habitat configuration overcome habitat composition influences on alpha and beta mammal diversity

André Luis Regolin, Milton Cezar Ribeiro, Felipe Martello, Geruza Leal Melo, Jonas Sponchiado, Luis Fernando De Castro Campanha, Larissa Sayuri Moreira Sugai, Thiago Sanna Freire Silva & Nilton Carlos Cáceres
The effects of habitat fragmentation on different taxa and ecosystems are subject to intense debate, and disentangling them is of utmost importance to support conservation and management strategies. We evaluated the importance of landscape composition and configuration, and spatial heterogeneity to explain α- and β-diversity of mammals across a gradient of percent woody cover and land use diversity. We expected species richness to be positively related to all predictive variables, with the strongest relationship with...

Chernobyl-level radiation exposure damages bumblebee reproduction: a laboratory experiment

Katherine Raines, Penelope Whitehorn, David Copplestone & Matthew Tinsley
The consequences for wildlife of living in radiologically contaminated environments are uncertain. Previous laboratory studies suggest insects are relatively radiation-resistant; however, some field studies from the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone report severe adverse effects at substantially lower radiation dose rates than expected. Here we present the first laboratory investigation to study how environmentally-relevant radiation exposure affects bumblebee life-history, assessing the shape of the relationship between radiation exposure and fitness-loss. Dose rates comparable to the Chernobyl Exclusion...

Branching patterns in phylogenies cannot distinguish diversity-dependent diversification from time-dependent diversification

Theo Pannetier, César Martinez, Lynsey Bunnefeld & Rampal S. Etienne
One of the primary goals of macroevolutionary biology has been to explain general trends in long-term diversity patterns, including whether such patterns correspond to an up-scaling of processes occurring at lower scales. Reconstructed phylogenies often show decelerated lineage accumulation over time. This pattern has often been interpreted as the result of diversity-dependent diversification, where the accumulation of species causes diversification to decrease through niche filling. However, other processes can also produce such a slowdown, including...

Ecology directs host-parasite coevolutionary trajectories across Daphnia-microparasite populations

Stuart Auld & Sam Paplauskas
Host-parasite interactions often fuel coevolutionary change. However, parasitism is one of a myriad of possible ecological interactions in nature. Biotic (e.g., predation) and abiotic (e.g., temperature) variation can amplify or dilute parasitism as a selective force on hosts and parasites, driving population variation in (co)evolutionary trajectories. We dissected the relationships between wider ecology and coevolutionary trajectory using 16 ecologically complex Daphnia magna-Pasteuria ramosa ponds seeded with an identical starting host (Daphnia) and parasite (Pasteuria) population....

Data from: Characterization of stress coping style in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) juveniles and breeders for aquaculture

Z. Ibarra-Zatarain, Elvira Fatsini, Sonia Rey, Olvido Chereguini, Ignacio Martin, Inmaculada Rasines, Carles Alcaraz & Neil Duncan
The aim of this work was to characterize stress coping styles of Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) juveniles and breeders and to select an operational behavioural screening test (OBST) that can be used by the aquaculture industry to classify and select between behavioural phenotypes in order to improve production indicators. A total of 61 juveniles and 59 breeders were subjected to five individual behavioural tests and two grouping tests. At the end of the individual tests,...

Data from: The developmental plasticity and functional significance of an additional sperm storage compartment in female yellow dung flies

Martin A. Schäfer, David Berger, Ralf Jochmann, Wolf U. Blanckenhorn & Luc F. Bussière
1. The mechanistic basis for, and adaptive significance of variation in female sperm storage organs is important for a range of questions concerning sexual selection and speciation, as such variation influences the evolutionary trajectories of male fertilization related traits and may facilitate speciation through its effects on gamete recognition. 2. Female yellow dung flies (Scathophaga stercoraria) usually develop three sperm storage compartments, and this subdivision may be an adaptation for sorting sperm during post-copulatory choice....

Data from: Analysis of inbreeding depression in mixed-mating plants provides evidence for selective interference and stable mixed mating

Alice A Winn, Elizabeth Elle, Susan Kalisz, Pierre-Olivier Cheptou, Christopher G Eckert, Carol Goodwillie, Mark O. Johnston, David A Moeller, Richard H Ree, Risa D Sargent & Mario Vallejo-Marín
Hermaphroditic individuals can produce both selfed and outcrossed progeny, termed mixed mating. General theory predicts that mixed-mating populations should evolve quickly toward high rates of selfing, driven by rapid purging of genetic load and loss of inbreeding depression (ID), but the substantial number of mixed-mating species observed in nature calls this prediction into question. Greater average ID reported for selfing than for outcrossing populations is consistent with purging and suggests that mixed-mating taxa in evolutionary...

Data from: Subgenome dominance in an interspecific hybrid, synthetic allopolyploid, and a 140-year-old naturally established neo-allopolyploid monkeyflower

Patrick P. Edger, Ronald D. Smith, Michael R. McKain, Arielle M. Cooley, Mario Vallejo-Marin, Yao-Wu Yuan, Adam J. Bewick, Lexiang Ji, Adrian E. Platts, Megan J. Bowman, Kevin Childs, Jacob D. Washburn, Robert Schmitz, Gregory D. Smith, J. Chris Pires & Joshua R. Puzey
Recent studies have shown that one of the parental subgenomes in ancient polyploids is generally more dominant - having both retained more genes and being more highly expressed - a phenomenon termed subgenome dominance. The genomic features that determine how quickly and which subgenome dominates within a newly formed polyploid remain poorly understood. To investigate the rate of subgenome dominance emergence, we examined gene expression, gene methylation, and transposable element (TE) methylation in a natural,...

Data from: Globally, functional traits are weak predictors of juvenile tree growth, and we do not know why

C. E. Timothy Paine, Lucy Amissah, Harald Auge, Christopher Baraloto, Martin Baruffol, Nils Bourland, Helge Bruelheide, Kasso Daïnou, Roland C. De Gouvenain, Jean-Louis Doucet, Susan Doust, Paul V. A. Fine, Claire Fortunel, Josephine Haase, Karen D. Holl, Hervé Jactel, Xuefei Li, Kaoru Kitajima, Julia Koricheva, Cristina Martínez-Garza, Christian Messier, Alain Paquette, Christopher Philipson, Daniel Piotto, Lourens Poorter … & Andy Hector
1. Plant functional traits, in particular specific leaf area (SLA), wood density and seed mass, are often good predictors of individual tree growth rates within communities. Individuals and species with high SLA, low wood density and small seeds tend to have faster growth rates. 2. If community-level relationships between traits and growth have general predictive value, then similar relationships should also be observed in analyses that integrate across taxa, biogeographic regions and environments. Such global...

Data from: Male-specific genotype by environment interactions influence viability selection acting on a sexually selected inversion system in the seaweed fly, Coelopa frigida.

Dominic Alexander Edward & André S. Gilburn
In the seaweed fly, Coelopa frigida, a large chromosomal inversion system is affected by sexual selection and viability selection. However, our understanding of the interaction between these two selective forces is currently limited as research has focused upon a limited range of environments. We allowed C. frigida larvae to develop in two different algae, Fucus and Laminaria, and then measured viability and body size for each inversion genotype. Significant male-specific genotype-by-environment interactions influenced viability and...

Data from: Sex as a strategy against rapidly evolving parasites

Stuart K. J. R. Auld, Shona K. Tinkler & Matthew C. Tinsley
Why is sex ubiquitous when asexual reproduction is much less costly? Sex disrupts coadapted gene complexes; it also causes costs associated with mate finding and the production of males who do not themselves bear offspring. Theory predicts parasites select for host sex, because genetically variable offspring can escape infection from parasites adapted to infect the previous generations. We examine this using a facultative sexual crustacean, Daphnia magna, and its sterilizing bacterial parasite, Pasteuria ramosa. We...

The Significance of Requirements in Medical Device Software Development

Martin McHugh, Abder-Rahman Ali & Fergal McCaffery

Soil profile descriptions, biomass data and vegetation species from a joint sampling event at Sourhope, Scotland, 2000 [NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme]

S. Buckland, C. Cornish, N. Ray, P. Bruneau, L. Dawson & J. Ross
This dataset includes: biomass data for roots, shoots and litter in soil core samples, vegetation species abundance data for sampled soil blocks, and soil profile descriptions (horizon types & depths) with corresponding pH and moisture content values by horizon for soil blocks. All data were collected during a joint sampling event, held at Sourhope, Scotland, where co-ordinated sampling took place on the 27-28th July 2000 involving groups from within the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme. A...

Carbon and nitrogen stocks in soil organic matter fractions along grassland-to-forest conversion chronosequences across Scotland in 2018

F.X. Joly & J.A. Subke
This dataset contains the carbon and nitrogen content of soil organic matter fractions collected along grassland-to-forest conversion chronosequences. Four chronosequences of grassland-to-forest conversion were used across Scotland, from Alyth to Craik. Soil samples were collected in summer 2018. Soil samples were collected using soil corers. In 2020, soil samples were fractionated in the laboratory, and the elemental composition of bulk soil and soil fraction samples was determined. The goal of the study was to determine...

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Affiliations

  • University of Stirling
    124
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