128 Works

Data from: Personality links with lifespan in chimpanzees

Drew M Altschul, William D Hopkins, Elizabeth S Herrelko, Miho Inoue-Murayama, Tetsuro Matsuzawa, James E King, Stephen R Ross & Alexander Weiss
Life-history strategies for optimizing individual fitness fall on a spectrum between maximizing reproductive efforts and maintaining physical health over time. Strategies across this spectrum are viable and different suites of personality traits have evolved to support these strategies. Using personality and survival data from 538 captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) we tested whether any of the dimensions of chimpanzee personality - agreeableness, conscientiousness, dominance, extraversion, neuroticism, and openness - were associated with longevity, an attribute of...

Data from: Genetic variation and clonal diversity in introduced populations of Mimulus guttatus assessed by genotyping at 62 single nucleotide polymorphism loci

Pauline O. Pantoja, Violeta I. Simon-Porcar, Joshua R. Puzey & Mario Vallejo-Marin
Background: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are increasingly being used to study non-native populations. SNPs are relatively information poor on a per locus basis, but allow genotyping more loci than others markers (e.g., microsatellites) and have the advantage of consistent allele calls between studies. Aims: We investigated the utility of a newly developed set of SNP markers, suitable for high throughput genotyping to characterise genotypic variation and population structure in non-native populations of the facultative clonal...

Data from: Whole genome duplication and transposable element proliferation drive genome expansion in Corydoradinae catfishes

Sarah Marburger, Markos A. Alexandrou, John B. Taggart, Simon Creer, Gary Carvalho, Claudio Oliveira & Martin I. Taylor
Genome size varies significantly across eukaryotic taxa and the largest changes are typically driven by macro-mutations such as whole genome duplications (WGDs) and proliferation of repetitive elements. These two processes may affect the evolutionary potential of lineages by increasing genetic variation and changing gene expression. Here we elucidate the evolutionary history and mechanisms underpinning genome size variation in a species rich group of Neotropical catfishes (Corydoradinae) with extreme variation in genome size - 0.6pg to...

Data from: Drivers of assemblage-wide calling activity in tropical anurans and the role of temporal resolution

Larissa Sayuri Sugai, Thiago Silva, Diego Llusia & Tadeu Siqueira
1. Temporal scale in animal communities is often associated with seasonality, despite the large variation in species activity during a diel cycle. A gap thus remains in understanding the dynamics of short-term activity in animal communities. 2. Here we assessed calling activity of tropical anurans and addressed how species composition varied during night activity in assemblages along gradients of local and landscape environmental heterogeneity. 3. We investigated 39 anuran assemblages in the Pantanal wetlands (Brazil)...

Occurrence of exotic plant species in oil palm dominated landscapes with embedded rainforest remnants in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, 2019

E.H. Waddell, D.S. Chapman, J.K. Hill, M. Hughes, A. Bin Sailim, J. Tangah & L.F. Banin
This dataset contains records of exotic plant occurrence within 21 oil palm-dominated sites in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. Within each site, exotic plants were recorded along 100m transects in up to four habitats that represented a gradient of disturbance. The four habitats included oil palm, forest-oil palm edge, disturbed forest and intact forest. In addition to exotic plant data, the dataset contains measurements of forest structure for each transect, including canopy cover and number of large...

Central place foraging in a human-dominated landscape - how do common cranes select feeding sites?

Lovisa Nilsson, Jens Persson, Nils Bunnefeld & Johan Månsson
Human infrastructure and disturbance play an important role when animals select resources in human-modified landscapes. Theory predicts that animals trade food intake against costs of movement or disturbance to optimize net energy gain and fitness, but other necessary resources may also constrain the decisions, e.g. when animals repeatedly need to return to a central location, such as a nest, waterhole or night roost. Central place foraging theory states that the probability of occurrence of an...

Data from: Bee and floral traits affect the characteristics of the vibrations experienced by flowers during buzz-pollination

Blanca Arroyo-Correa, Ceit Beattie & Mario Vallejo-Marin
During buzz pollination, bees use their indirect flight muscles to produce vibrations that are transmitted to the flowers and result in pollen release. Although buzz pollination has been known for >100 years, we are still in the early stages of understanding how bee and floral characteristics affect the production and transmission of floral vibrations. Here we analysed floral vibrations produced by four closely related bumblebee taxa (Bombus spp.) on two buzz-pollinated plants species (Solanum spp.)....

Data from: Proactive avoidance behaviour and pace-of-life syndrome in Atlantic salmon

Børge Damsgård, Tor H. Evensen, Øyvind Øverli, Marnix Gorissen, Lars Ebbesson, Sonia Ray & Erik Höglund
Individuals in a fish population differ in key life history traits such as growth rate and body size. This raises the question of whether such traits cluster along a fast-slow growth continuum according to a pace-of-life syndrome (POLS). Fish species like salmonids may develop a bimodal size distribution, providing an opportunity to study the relationships between individual growth and behavioural responsiveness. Here we test whether proactive characteristics (bold behaviour coupled with low post-stress cortisol production)...

Data from: Connectivity with primary forest determines the value of secondary tropical forests for bird conservation

Rebekah J. Mayhew, Joseph A. Tobias, Lynsey Bunnefeld & Daisy H. Dent.
Predicted species extinctions caused by the destruction and degradation of tropical primary forest may be at least partially mitigated by the expansion of regenerating secondary forest. However, the conservation value of secondary forest remains controversial, and potentially underestimated, since most previous studies have focused on young, single-aged, or isolated stands. Here we use point count surveys to compare tropical forest bird communities in 20–120-yr-old secondary forest and primary forest stands in central Panama, with varying...

Stakeholder surveys to local farmers and officials in Chinese villages to understand knowledge management dynamics

Y. Zheng, L. Naylor, S. Waldron & D. Oliver
Data comprise results of social surveys carried out in China during 2016 – 2018 to the local stakeholders (farmers and village to county level officials) to understand their knowledge learning dynamics and preference. Surveys were conducted in the rural villages in Puding County, Guizhou Province and in Yujiang County, Jiangxi Province. The study was funded by the grant NE/N007425/1 which was awarded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), and through cooperation with grant...

Comparative data for dance fly eye morphology and female ornamentation

R. Axel W. Wiberg, Rosalind L Murray, Elizabeth Herridge, Darryl T Gwynne & Luc F Bussière
These data were collected as part of a comparative study of the relationship between female ornamentation and sexual dimorphism in eye morphology. Data come from specimens collected in the field in Scotland near Loch Lomond in the summers of 2009, 2010, and 2011 as well as the summer of 2012 near Glen Williams in Ontario, Canada. The repository contains raw image files including information on magnifications at which these were taken, excel spreadsheets of morphological...

Invasion of freshwater ecosystems is promoted by network connectivity to hotspots of human activity

Daniel Chapman
Aim: Hotspots of human activity are focal points for ecosystem disturbance and non-native introduction, from which invading populations disperse and spread. As such, connectivity to locations used by humans may influence the likelihood of invasion. Moreover, connectivity in freshwater ecosystems may follow the hydrological network. Here we tested whether multiple forms of connectivity to human recreational activities promotes biological invasion of freshwater ecosystems. Location: England, UK. Time period: 1990-2018. Major taxa studied: 126 non-native freshwater...

Bryophyte microecosystem experiment

Adam Vanbergen, Claire Boissieres, Alan Gray & Daniel Chapman
Ecosystems face multiple, potentially interacting, anthropogenic pressures that can modify biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Using a bryophyte-microarthropod microecosystem we tested the combined effects of habitat loss, episodic heat-shocks and an introduced non-native apex predator on ecosystem function (chlorophyll fluorescence as an indicator of photosystem II function) and microarthropod communities (abundance and body size). Photosynthetic function was degraded by the sequence of heat-shock episodes, but unaffected by microecosystem patch size or top-down pressure from the introduced...

Anther cones increase pollen release in buzz-pollinated Solanum flowers

Mario Vallejo-Marín, Carlos Eduardo Pereira Nunes & Avery Leigh Russell
The widespread evolution of tube-like anthers releasing pollen from apical pores is associated with buzz pollination, in which bees vibrate flowers to remove pollen. The mechanical connection among anthers in buzz-pollinated species varies from loosely held conformations, to anthers tightly held together with trichomes or bio-adhesives forming a functionally joined conical structure (anther cone). Joined anther cones in buzz-pollinated species have evolved independently across plant families and via different genetic mechanisms, yet their functional significance...

Leap-frog migration and residents: new migratory habits in Swedish Greylag geese

Lovisa Nilsson, Camilla Olsson, Johan Elmberg, Nils Bunnefeld, Niklas Liljebäck & Johan Månsson
Knowledge about intraspecific and individual variation in bird migration behavior is important to predict spatiotemporal distribution, patterns of phenology, breeding success and interactions with the surrounding environment (e.g., human livelihoods). Such variation is key to adaptive, evolutionary responses, i.e., how individuals respond spatiotemporally to the environment to maximize fitness. In this study we used GPS location data from one to three full annual cycles from 76 Greylag geese Anser anser to test the hypothesis that...

Reduced visitation to buzz-pollinated Cyanella hyacinthoides in the presence of other pollen sources in the hyperdiverse Cape Floristic Region

Jurene Kemp, Francismeire Telles & Mario Vallejo-Marin
Many plant species have floral morphologies that restrict access to floral resources, such as pollen or nectar, and only a subset of floral visitors can perform the handling behaviours required to extract restricted resources. Due to the time and energy required to extract resources from morphologically complex flowers, these plant species potentially compete for pollinators with co-flowering plants that have more easily accessible resources. A widespread floral mechanism restricting access to pollen is the presence...

Determining the success of carbon capture and storage projects

Dominique Thronicker & Ian Lange
Carbon Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions can be captured from large point sources, transported to geological sites, and sequestered indefinitely using a variety of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies. Regarded as the most important technological approach to mitigating climate change, CCS has had some success being deployed in the oil and gas industry, but deployment in the power sector has only occurred with pilot plants. While a number of CCS projects have been successfully deployed...

Data from: Neonicotinoid pesticide reduces bumblebee colony growth and queen production

Penelope R. Whitehorn, Stephanie O'Connor, Felix L. Wackers & Dave Goulson
Growing evidence for declines in bee populations has caused great concern because of the valuable ecosystem services they provide. Neonicotinoid insecticides have been implicated in these declines because they occur at trace levels in the nectar and pollen of crop plants. We exposed colonies of the bumble bee Bombus terrestris in the laboratory to field-realistic levels of the neonicotinoid imidacloprid, then allowed them to develop naturally under field conditions. Treated colonies had a significantly reduced...

Exposure of burrowing mammals to Radon Rn-222 in Northwest England

N.A. Beresford, C.L. Barnett, J. Vives I Batlle, E.D. Potter, Z-F. Ibrahimi, T.S. Barlow, C. Schieb, D.G. Jones & D. Copplestone
This dataset includes individual passive detector measurements of radon Rn-222 in the air of artificial burrows, Rn-222 measurements by instrumentation in soil gas of interstitial soil pores and burrow air, gamma analyses results for soil samples and, soil moisture and temperature data. Estimates of absorbed dose rates to wildlife from exposure to natural background radionuclides are required to put estimates of dose rates arising from regulated releases of radioactivity and proposed benchmarks into context. These...

Element and radionuclide concentrations in representative species of the ICRP's Reference Animals and Plants and associated soils from a forest in north-west England

C.L. Barnett, N.A. Beresford, L.A. Walker, M. Baxter, C. Wells & D. Copplestone
This dataset presents the results of an initial sampling exercise conducted at a terrestrial site in northwest England in summer 2010. The following samples of terrestrial Reference Animals and Plants (RAPs) were obtained from an area of circa 0.4 km squared: Molinia caerulea (ICRP RAP Wild Grass defined as Poaceae); Picea sitchensis (ICRP RAP Pine Tree defined as Pinaceae); Apis spp., Bombus spp., Nomada spp. (ICRP RAP Bee defined as Apidea); Apodemus sylvaticus (ICRP RAP...

Data from: High genetic diversity and distinctiveness of rear-edge climate relicts maintained by ancient tetraploidisation for Alnus glutinosa

Olivier Lepais, Serge D. Muller, Samia Ben Saad-Limam, Mohamed Benslama, Laila Rhazi, Djamila Belouahem-Abed, Amina Daoud-Bouattour, Amor Mokhtar Gammar, Zeineb Ghrabi-Gammar & Cécile Fanny Emilie Bacles
Populations located at the rear-edge of a species’ distribution may have disproportionate ecological and evolutionary importance for biodiversity conservation in a changing global environment. Yet genetic studies of such populations remain rare. This study investigates the evolutionary history of North-African low latitude marginal populations of Alnus glutinosa Gaertn., a European tree species that plays a significant ecological role as a keystone of riparian ecosystems. We genotyped 551 adults from 19 populations located across North Africa...

Data from: Population structure and genetic diversity of native and invasive populations of Solanum rostratum (Solanaceae)

Jiali Zhao, Lislie Solís-Montero, Anru Lou & Mario Vallejo-Marín
Aims: We investigate native and introduced populations of Solanum rostratum, an annual, self-compatible plant that has been introduced around the globe. This study is the first to compare the genetic diversity of Solanum rostratum between native and introduced populations. We aim to (1) determine the level of genetic diversity across the studied regions; (2) explore the likely origins of invasive populations in China; and (3) investigate whether there is the evidence of multiple introductions into...

Data from: Combining animal personalities with transcriptomics resolves individual variation within a wild-type zebrafish population and identifies underpinning molecular differences in brain function

Sonia Rey, Sebastian Boltana, Reynaldo Vargas, Nerea Roher & Simon MacKenzie
Resolving phenotype variation within a population in response to environmental perturbation is central to understanding biological adaptation. Relating meaningful adaptive changes at the level of the transcriptome requires the identification of processes that have a functional significance for the individual. This remains a major objective towards understanding the complex interactions between environmental demand and an individual's capacity to respond to such demands. The interpretation of such interactions and the significance of biological variation between individuals...

Observations of Fukushima fallout in Great Britain

N.A. Beresford, C.L. Barnett, B.J. Howard, D.C. Howard, A.N. Tyler, S. Bradley & D. Copplestone
Following the Fukushima accident in March 2011, grass samples were collected from 42 sites around Great Britain during April 2011. Iodine-131 was measurable in grass samples across the country with activity concentrations ranging from 10 to 55 Bq per kg dry matter. Concentrations were similar to those reported in other European countries. Rainwater and some foodstuffs were also analysed from a limited number of sites. Of these, I-131 was only detectable in sheep's milk (c....

Data from: De novo discovery and multiplexed amplification of microsatellite markers for black alder (Alnus glutinosa) and related species using SSR-enriched shotgun pyrosequencing.

Olivier Lepais & Cecile F. E. Bacles
Recent developments in sequencing technologies and bioinformatics analyses provide an unprecedented opportunity for cost and time effective high quality microsatellite marker discovery in non-model organisms for which no genomic information is available. Here, we use shotgun pyrosequencing of a microsatellite-enriched library to develop, for the first time, microsatellite markers for Alnus glutinosa, a keystone tree species of European riparian woodland communities. From a total of 17,855 short sequences, we identified 590 perfect microsatellites from which...

Registration Year

  • 2022
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    8
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Stirling
    127
  • UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    8
  • University of Edinburgh
    5
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    4
  • University of Aberdeen
    4
  • Dalhousie University
    4
  • University of Zurich
    4
  • Whitman College
    4
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    3
  • Sao Paulo State University
    3