128 Works

Data from: Climatic stress during stand development alters the sign and magnitude of age-related growth responses in a subtropical mountain pine

Paloma Ruiz-Benito, Jaime Madrigal-Gonzalez, Sarah Young, Pierre Merctoris, Liam Cavin, Tsurng-Juhn Huang, Jan-Chan Chen, Alistair S. Jump, Pierre Mercatoris & Jan-Chang Chen
The modification of typical age-related growth by environmental changes is poorly understood, In part because there is a lack of consensus at individual tree level regarding age-dependent growth responses to climate warming as stands develop. To increase our current understanding about how multiple drivers of environmental change can modify growth responses as trees age we used tree ring data of a mountain subtropical pine species along an altitudinal gradient covering more than 2,200 m of...

Data from: Sex allocation theory reveals a hidden cost of neonicotinoid exposure in a parasitoid wasp

Penelope R. Whitehorn, Nicola Cook, Charlotte V. Blackburn, Sophie M. Gill, Jade Green, Shuker M. David & D. M. Shuker
Sex allocation theory has proved to be one the most successful theories in evolutionary ecology. However, its role in more applied aspects of ecology has been limited. Here we show how sex allocation theory helps uncover an otherwise hidden cost of neonicotinoid exposure in the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis. Female N. vitripennis allocate the sex of their offspring in line with Local Mate Competition (LMC) theory. Neonicotinoids are an economically important class of insecticides, but...

Data from: Identification and validation of single nucleotide polymorphisms as tools to detect hybridization and population structure in freshwater stingrays

Vanessa Paes Cruz, Manuel Vera, Belén Gomes Pardo, John Taggart, Paulino Martinez, Claudio Oliveira & Fausto Foresti
Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were identified and validated for two stingrays species, Potamotrygon motoro and Potamotrygon falkneri, using double digest restriction-site associated DNA (ddRAD) reads using 454-Roche technology. A total of 226 774 reads (65.5 Mb) were obtained (mean read length 289 ± 183 bp) detecting a total of 5399 contigs (mean contig length: 396 ± 91 bp). Mining this data set, a panel of 143 in silico SNPs was selected. Eighty-two of these...

Data from: Net assimilation rate determines the growth rates of 14 species of subtropical forest trees

Xuefei Li, Bernhard Schmid, Fei Wang & C. E. Timothy Paine
Growth rates are of fundamental importance for plants, as individual size affects myriad ecological processes. We determined the factors that generate variation in RGR among 14 species of trees and shrubs that are abundant in subtropical Chinese forests. We grew seedlings for two years at four light levels in a shade-house experiment. We monitored the growth of every juvenile plant every two weeks. After one and two years, we destructively harvested individuals and measured their...

Data from: A trait-based trade-off between growth and mortality: evidence from 15 tropical tree species using size-specific RGRs

Christopher D. Philipson, Daisy H. Dent, Michael J. O’Brien, Juliette Chamagne, Dzaeman Dzulkifli, Reuben Nilus, Sam Philips, Glen Reynolds, Philippe Saner, Andy Hector & Michael J. O'Brien
A life-history trade-off between low mortality in the dark and rapid growth in the light is one of the most widely accepted mechanisms underlying plant ecological strategies in tropical forests. Differences in plant functional traits are thought to underlie these distinct ecological strategies; however, very few studies have shown relationships between functional traits and demographic rates within a functional group. We present 8 years of growth and mortality data from saplings of 15 species of...

Data from: Early-life disease exposure and associations with adult survival, cause of death, and reproductive success in preindustrial humans

Adam Hayward, Francesca L. Rigby & Virpi Lummaa
A leading hypothesis proposes that increased human life span since 1850 has resulted from decreased exposure to childhood infections, which has reduced chronic inflammation and later-life mortality rates, particularly from cardiovascular disease, stroke, and cancer. Early-life cohort mortality rate often predicts later-life survival in humans, but such associations could arise from factors other than disease exposure. Additionally, the impact of early-life disease exposure on reproduction remains unknown, and thus previous work ignores a major component...

Data from: Genetic diversity and connectivity within Mytilus spp. in the subarctic and Arctic

Sofie Smedegaard Mathiesen, Jakob Thyrring, Jakob Hemmer-Hansen, Jørgen Berge, Alexey Sukhotin, Peter Leopold, Michaël Bekaert, Mikael Kristian Sejr & Einar E. Nielsen
Climate changes in the Arctic are predicted to alter distributions of marine species. However, such changes are difficult to quantify because information on present species distribution and the genetic variation within species is lacking or poorly examined. Blue mussels, Mytilus spp. are ecosystem engineers in the coastal zone globally. In order to improve knowledge of distribution and genetic structure of the Mytilus edulis complex in the Arctic, we analyzed 81 SNPs in 534 Mytilus spp....

Data from: Mating opportunities and energetic constraints drive variation in age-dependent sexual signalling

Thomas M. Houslay, Kirsty F. Houslay, James Rapkin, John Hunt & Luc F. Bussiere
When males repeatedly produce energetically expensive sexual signals, trade-offs between current and future investment can cause plasticity in age-dependent signalling. Such variation is often interpreted as alternate adaptive strategies: live fast and die young vs. slow and steady. An alternative (yet rarely tested) explanation is that condition-dependent constraints on allocation cause variation in signalling with age (‘late bloomers’ do not have early investment options). Testing this hypothesis is challenging because resource acquisition and allocation are...

Data from: The changing environment of conservation conflict: geese and farming in Scotland

Tom H. E. Mason, Aidan Keane, Stephen M. Redpath & Nils Bunnefeld
1.Conflict between conservation objectives and human livelihoods is ubiquitous and can be highly damaging, but the processes generating it are poorly understood. Ecological elements are central to conservation conflict, and changes in their dynamics – for instance due to anthropogenic environmental change – are likely to influence the emergence of serious human-wildlife impacts and, consequently, social conflict. 2.We used mixed-effects models to examine the drivers of historic spatio-temporal dynamics in numbers of Greenland barnacle geese...

Data from: Life-stage associated remodeling of lipid metabolism regulation in Atlantic salmon

Gareth Gillard, Thomas N. Harvey, Arne Gjuvsland, Yang Jin, Magny Thomassen, Sigbjorn Lien, Michael Leaver, Jacob S. Torgersen, Torgeir R. Hvidsten, Jon Olav Vik, Simen Sandve & Simen R. Sandve
Atlantic salmon migrates from rivers to sea to feed, grow and develop gonads before returning to spawn in freshwater. The transition to marine habitats is associated with dramatic changes in the environment, including water salinity, exposure to pathogens, and shift in dietary lipid availability. Many anticipatory changes in physiology occur before migration to sea, but little is known about the molecular nature of these changes. Here we use a long term feeding experiment to study...

Data from: Sex differences in adult mortality rate mediated by early-life environmental conditions

Robert M. Griffin, Adam D. Hayward, Elisabeth Bolund, Alexei A. Maklakov & Virpi Lummaa
Variation in sex differences is affected by both genetic and environmental variation, with rapid change in sex differences being more likely due to environmental change. One case of rapid change in sex differences is human lifespan, which has become increasingly female-biased in recent centuries. Long-term consequences of variation in the early-life environment may, in part, explain such variation in sex differences, but whether the early-life environment mediates sex differences in life-history traits is poorly understood...

Data from: An integrated framework to identify wildlife populations under threat from climate change

Orly Razgour, John B. Taggart, Stéphanie Manel, Javier Juste, Carlos Ibáñez, Hugo Rebelo, Antton Alberdi, Gareth Jones & Kirsty Park
Climate change is a major threat to global biodiversity that will produce a range of new selection pressures. Understanding species responses to climate change requires an interdisciplinary perspective, combining ecological, molecular and environmental approaches. We propose an applied integrated framework to identify populations under threat from climate change based on their extent of exposure, inherent sensitivity due to adaptive and neutral genetic variation and range shift potential. We consider intraspecific vulnerability and population-level responses, an...

Data from: Evolution and conservation of Characidium sex chromosomes

Ricardo Utsunomia, Priscilla C. Scacchetti, Miguel Hermida, Raquel Fernández-Cebrián, Xoana Taboada, Carlos Fernandez, Michaël Bekaert, Natalia J. Mendes, Diego Robledo, Judith E. Mank, John B. Taggart, Claudio Oliveira, Fausto Foresti & Paulino Martínez
Fish species exhibit substantial variation in the degree of genetic differentiation between sex chromosome pairs, and therefore offer the opportunity to study the full range of sex chromosome evolution. We used restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) to study the sex chromosomes of Characidium gomesi, a species with conspicuous heteromorphic ZW/ZZ sex chromosomes. We screened 9863 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), corresponding to ~1 marker/100 kb distributed across the genome for sex-linked variation. With this data set, we...

Earthworm and botanical data from the Sweethope mesocosm experimental site, Sourhope, Scotland, 2001 [NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme]

C.A. Spring, H.O. Bishop, M. Pawlett, C.H. Robinson, I.C. Grieve, J.A. Chudek, D.W. Hopkins, J. A. Harris & D.A. Davidson
This dataset comprises botanical composition and earthworm species and abundance data, sampled from a mesocosm experiment (named Sweethope) in October 2001. The mesocosm site replicated the layout of the main experimental plots at the NERC Soil Biodiversity site at Sourhope, Scotland and was established to avoid contaminating the main Sourhope plots. The NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme was established in 1999 and was centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at...

Data from: Litter conversion into detritivore faeces reshuffles the quality control over C and N dynamics during decomposition

François-Xavier Joly, Sylvain Coq, Mathieu Coulis, Johanne Nahmani & Stephan Hattenschwiler
1. In many terrestrial ecosystems, detritivorous soil organisms ingest large amounts of leaf litter returning most of it to the soil as faeces. Such conversion of leaf litter into faeces may stimulate decomposition by increasing the surface area available for microbial colonization. Yet, experimental support for either the outcome or the mechanism of these conversion effects is lacking. 2. Based on the hypothesis that the identity of plant species from which leaf litter is transformed...

Data from: The impact of uncertainty on cooperation intent in a conservation conflict

Chris R. J. Pollard, Steve Redpath, Luc F. Bussière, Aidan Keane, Des B. A. Thompson, Juliette C. Young & Nils Bunnefeld
Stakeholder cooperation can be vital in managing conservation conflicts. Laboratory experiments show cooperation is less likely in the presence of uncertainty. Much less is known about how stakeholders in real‐life conservation conflicts respond to different types of uncertainty. We tested the effects of different sources of uncertainty on cooperative behaviour using a framed field experiment and interviews. The experiment compared a baseline scenario of perfect certainty with scenarios including either: i) scientific uncertainty about the...

Data from: Coupled land use and ecological models reveal emergence and feedbacks in socio‐ecological systems

Nicholas W. Synes, Calum Brown, Stephen C. F. Palmer, Greta Bocedi, Patrick E. Osborne, Kevin Watts, Janet Franklin & Justin M. J. Travis
Understanding the dynamics of socio‐ecological systems is crucial to the development of environmentally sustainable practices. Models of social or ecological sub‐systems have greatly enhanced such understanding, but at the risk of obscuring important feedbacks and emergent effects. Integrated modelling approaches have the potential to address this shortcoming by explicitly representing linked socio‐ecological dynamics. We developed a socio‐ecological system model by coupling an existing agent‐based model of land‐use dynamics and an individual‐based model of demography and...

Data from: Oecanthus nigricornis (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) as the first known host of Stylogaster neglecta (Diptera: Conopidae)

Erik Etzler, William D. Brown, Luc F. Bussière & Darryl T. Gwynne
The conopid fly Stylogaster neglecta Williston (Diptera: Conopidae) is a parasitoid with no known host. We report this species as the first recorded dipteran parasitoid of Oecanthus nigricornis Walker (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) (black-horned tree crickets). We reared field-collected O. nigricornis juveniles over several months in 2017 and found that larval S. neglecta emerged from them during late July into August. We estimated the incubation period for S. neglecta larvae to be around 30 days based on...

Meteorological Data from BGS Virkisjökull-Falljökull Glacier Observatory, 2009-2020

Jez Everest, Heiko Buxel, Tom Bradwell, Tom Shanahan & Jon Mackay
This dataset presents meteorological records from 3 weather stations around a glacier in southeast Iceland from 2009-2020. The weather stations were installed as part of British Geological Survey’s Glacier Observatory project, and were positioned at different altitudes close to the ice to record glacier weather. The data is in text format, and records key meteorological parameters including temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, precipitation, wind speed and direction, and solar irradiance. The weather stations were placed...

Data from: Negative density dependence in the mortality and growth of tropical tree seedlings is strong, and primarily caused by fungal pathogens

Kirstie Hazelwood, Harald Beck & C. E. Timothy Paine
Natural enemies have been implicated as agents of negative density dependence (NDD) in tropical forests, but their relative contributions to NDD, and thus to the maintenance of diversity, are largely unknown. We monitored the rates of survival and relative growth rates on seedlings for ten years in tropical moist forest in Manu National Park, Peru. We then experimentally manipulated the plots to exclude fungal pathogens, insects, small mammals, and large mammals for an additional 31...

High spatial resolution seasonal distributions of faecally-derived waterborne and sediment bacteria in standing waters, Glasgow, UK, 2016-2017

Z. Pattison, R.S. Quilliam, D. Oliver & N.J. Willby
This dataset contains information about water quality based on faecal indicators at 15 lakes in the Greater Glasgow conurbation, Scotland. Lakes were sampled in winter (2016/17) and summer (2017) with faecal indicators being quantified at high spatial resolution (up to 60 points per lake depending on water body size) in sediment and water from each lake. Faecal indicators were quantified based on standard dilution, membrane filtration and incubation for water, and incubation in bacteria-specific broth,...

Microsatellite marker data for Chernobyl Daphnia populations

Stuart Auld
Populations experiencing varying levels of ionising radiation provide an excellent opportunity to study the fundamental drivers of evolution. Radiation can cause mutations, and thus supply genetic variation; it can also selectively remove individuals that are unable to cope with the physiological stresses associated with radiation exposure, or non-selectively cull swathes of the population, reducing genetic variation. Since the nuclear power plant explosion in 1986, the Chernobyl area has experienced a spatially heterogeneous exposure to varying...

Ecological inference using data from accelerometers needs careful protocols

Baptiste Garde, Rory Wilson, Adam Fell, Nik Cole, Vikash Tatayah, Mark Holton, Kayleigh Rose, Richard Metcalfe, Hermina Robotka, Martin Wikelski, Fred Tremblay, Shannon Whelan, Kyle Elliott & Emily Shepard
1. Accelerometers in animal-attached tags have proven to be powerful tools in behavioural ecology, being used to determine behaviour and provide proxies for movement-based energy expenditure. Researchers are collecting and archiving data across systems, seasons and device types. However, in order to use data repositories to draw ecological inference, we need to establish the error introduced according to sensor type and position on the study animal and establish protocols for error assessment and minimization. 2....

Data from: Analysis of inbreeding depression in mixed-mating plants provides evidence for selective interference and stable mixed mating

Alice A Winn, Elizabeth Elle, Susan Kalisz, Pierre-Olivier Cheptou, Christopher G Eckert, Carol Goodwillie, Mark O. Johnston, David A Moeller, Richard H Ree, Risa D Sargent & Mario Vallejo-Marín
Hermaphroditic individuals can produce both selfed and outcrossed progeny, termed mixed mating. General theory predicts that mixed-mating populations should evolve quickly toward high rates of selfing, driven by rapid purging of genetic load and loss of inbreeding depression (ID), but the substantial number of mixed-mating species observed in nature calls this prediction into question. Greater average ID reported for selfing than for outcrossing populations is consistent with purging and suggests that mixed-mating taxa in evolutionary...

Data from: Estimation of bumblebee queen dispersal distances using sibship reconstruction method

Olivier Lepais, Ben Darvill, Stephanie O'Connor, Juliet Osborne, Roy Sanderson, John Cussans, Louis Goffe & Dave Goulson
Dispersal ability is a key determinant of the propensity of an organism to cope with habitat fragmentation and climate change. Here we quantify queen dispersal in two common bumblebee species in an arable landscape. Dispersal was measured by taking DNA samples from workers in the spring and summer, and from queens in the following spring, at 14 sites across a landscape. The queens captured in the spring must be full sisters of workers that were...

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