15 Works

Survey data of scientists on knowledge exchange in critical zone and geoscience

Y. Zheng, L.A Naylor, S. Waldron & D.M. Oliver
Survey data on knowledge exchange experience of both Chinese and British scientists working on critical zone and more broadly on geoscience. Data are drawn from questionnaire surveys to explore the knowledge management methods used in their environmental research. Data are anonymised social survey data from questionnaires. The data were generated during the NERC grant 'The transmissive critical zone: understanding the karst hydrology-biogeochemical interface for sustainable management' reference NE/N007425/1 undertaken as part of the NERC Using...

Literature review of knowledge management across the environment-policy interface in China

Y. Zheng, L.A. Naylor, S. Waldron & D.M. Oliver
Data from literature search systematically conducted using two widely-used academic databases: Web of Science™ (WoS) and Scopus . Data include the annual amount of KM publication in China and across the world, in WoS, the total amount of knowledge management (KM) publication during the searched years for each country (top 20), in Scopus, the total amount of KM publication during the searched years for each country (top 20), information about the retained KM publication for...

Data from: Pattern and process in hominin brain size evolution are scale-dependent

Andrew Du, Andrew M. Zipkin, Kevin G. Hatala, Elizabeth Renner, Jennifer L. Baker, Serena Bianchi, Kallista H. Bernal & Bernard A. Wood
A large brain is a defining feature of modern humans, yet there is no consensus regarding the patterns, rates, and processes involved in hominin brain size evolution. We use a reliable proxy for brain size in fossils, endocranial volume (ECV), to better understand how brain size evolved at both clade- and lineage-level scales. For the hominin clade overall, the dominant signal is consistent with a gradual increase in brain size. This gradual trend appears to...

Data from: Natural selection and outbreeding depression suggest adaptive differentiation in the invasive range of a clonal plant

Pauline Oliveira Pantoja, Charles Eliot Timothy Paine & Mario Vallejo-Marin
Analyses of phenotypic selection and demography in field populations are powerful ways to establishing the potential role of natural selection in shaping evolution during biological invasions. Here we use experimental F2 crosses between native and introduced populations of Mimulus guttatus to estimate the pattern of natural selection in part of its introduced range, and to seek evidence of outbreeding depression of colonists. The F2s combined the genome of an introduced population with the genome of...

Data from: The influence of topography and soil phosphorus on the vegetation of Korup Forest Reserve, Cameroun

Duncan W. Thomas, David M. Newbery, P. G. Waterman & J. S. Gartlan
All living trees (≥ 30 cm gbh) were enumerated in 135 80×80 m plots, each subdivided into four 40×40 m subplots, and arranged along four 5 km transect lines in the Korup Forest Reserve, Cameroun. For each plot altitude, slope and the extent of permanent and seasonal swamps were recorded. Four hundred and eleven taxa were recognized of which 66% were identified to species. Mean tree density was 471 ha−1, basal area 27.6 m2 ha−1...

Data from: Floristic variation within kerangas (heath) forest: re-evaluation of data from Sarawak and Brunei

E. F. Brunig & D. McC. Newbery
The variation in species composition of trees greater-than-or-equal-to 7.6 cm gbh in thirty-eight plots (mostly c. 0.2 ha in extent) from physiognomically-defined kerangas forest were re-analyzed by principal components analysis ordination (species centering and standardization by sample norm). Analyses were performed separately on basal area abundances, on the densities of trees in three size classes (greater-than-or-equal-to 7.6, greater-than-or-equal-to 30.5 and greater-than-or-equal-to 61.0 cm gbh) and on the density of small and large trees (7.6- <...

Earthworm data from Sourhope field experiment site, Scotland, 1999 and 2001 [NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme]

H.O. Bishop, I.C. Grieve, J.A. Chudek & D.W. Hopkins
This set of data describes earthworm diversity in soil samples taken at the Sourhope experimental site in 1999 and 2001 by the Universities of Glasgow and Dundee. Data were collected during a project funded under the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme. The NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme was established in 1999 and was centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute)...

Data from: Context-dependent colonisation of terrestrial habitat 'islands' by a long-distance migrant bird

Robin C. Whytock, Elisa Fuentes-Montemayor, Kevin Watts, Nicholas A. Macgregor, Lefora Williams & Kirsty J. Park
Landscape context can affect how individuals perceive patch quality during colonisation. However, although context-dependent colonisation has been observed in aquatic environments it has rarely been studied in terrestrial environments or at large spatial scales. Here, we assessed how landscape context influenced colonisation rates in a large-scale (c.7000 km2) terrestrial system where colonisers (Willow Warbler Phylloscopus trochilus) are capable of rapid, long-distance movements. Bioacoustic recorders were used to detect first song dates (an indicator of colonisation...

Data from: Parallel evolution and adaptation to environmental factors in a marine flatfish: implications for fisheries and aquaculture management of the turbot (Scophthalmus maximus)

Fernanda Dotti Do Prado, Manuel Vera, Miguel Hermida, Carmen Bouza, Belén G. Pardo, Román Vilas, Andrés Blanco, Carlos Fernández, Francesco Maroso, Gregory E. Maes, Cemal Turan, Filip A.M. Volckaert, John B. Taggart, Adrian Carr, Rob Ogden, Einar E. Nielsen, The Aquatrace Consortium, Paulino Martínez & Filip A. M. Volckaert
Unraveling adaptive genetic variation represents, in addition to the estimate of population demographic parameters, a cornerstone for the management of aquatic natural living resources, which in turn, represent the raw material for breeding programs. The turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) is a marine flatfish of high commercial value living on the European continental shelf. While wild populations are declining, aquaculture is flourishing in Southern Europe. We evaluated the genetic structure of turbot throughout its natural distribution range...

Data from: The effectiveness of journals as arbiters of scientific quality

C.E. Timothy Paine, Charles W. Fox & C. E. Timothy Paine
Academic publishers purport to be arbiters of knowledge, aiming to publish studied that advance the frontiers of their research domain. Yet the effectiveness of journal editors at identifying novel and important research is generally unknown, in part because of the confidential nature of the editorial and peer-review process. Using questionnaires, we evaluated the degree to which journals are effective arbiters of scientific impact in the domain of Ecology, quantified by three key criteria. First, journals...

Data from: Personality links with lifespan in chimpanzees

Drew M Altschul, William D Hopkins, Elizabeth S Herrelko, Miho Inoue-Murayama, Tetsuro Matsuzawa, James E King, Stephen R Ross & Alexander Weiss
Life-history strategies for optimizing individual fitness fall on a spectrum between maximizing reproductive efforts and maintaining physical health over time. Strategies across this spectrum are viable and different suites of personality traits have evolved to support these strategies. Using personality and survival data from 538 captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) we tested whether any of the dimensions of chimpanzee personality - agreeableness, conscientiousness, dominance, extraversion, neuroticism, and openness - were associated with longevity, an attribute of...

Data from: Whole genome duplication and transposable element proliferation drive genome expansion in Corydoradinae catfishes

Sarah Marburger, Markos A. Alexandrou, John B. Taggart, Simon Creer, Gary Carvalho, Claudio Oliveira & Martin I. Taylor
Genome size varies significantly across eukaryotic taxa and the largest changes are typically driven by macro-mutations such as whole genome duplications (WGDs) and proliferation of repetitive elements. These two processes may affect the evolutionary potential of lineages by increasing genetic variation and changing gene expression. Here we elucidate the evolutionary history and mechanisms underpinning genome size variation in a species rich group of Neotropical catfishes (Corydoradinae) with extreme variation in genome size - 0.6pg to...

Data from: Coupled land use and ecological models reveal emergence and feedbacks in socio‐ecological systems

Nicholas W. Synes, Calum Brown, Stephen C. F. Palmer, Greta Bocedi, Patrick E. Osborne, Kevin Watts, Janet Franklin & Justin M. J. Travis
Understanding the dynamics of socio‐ecological systems is crucial to the development of environmentally sustainable practices. Models of social or ecological sub‐systems have greatly enhanced such understanding, but at the risk of obscuring important feedbacks and emergent effects. Integrated modelling approaches have the potential to address this shortcoming by explicitly representing linked socio‐ecological dynamics. We developed a socio‐ecological system model by coupling an existing agent‐based model of land‐use dynamics and an individual‐based model of demography and...

Earthworm and botanical data from the Sweethope mesocosm experimental site, Sourhope, Scotland, 2001 [NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme]

C.A. Spring, H.O. Bishop, M. Pawlett, C.H. Robinson, I.C. Grieve, J.A. Chudek, D.W. Hopkins, J. A. Harris & D.A. Davidson
This dataset comprises botanical composition and earthworm species and abundance data, sampled from a mesocosm experiment (named Sweethope) in October 2001. The mesocosm site replicated the layout of the main experimental plots at the NERC Soil Biodiversity site at Sourhope, Scotland and was established to avoid contaminating the main Sourhope plots. The NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme was established in 1999 and was centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at...

Data from: Litter conversion into detritivore faeces reshuffles the quality control over C and N dynamics during decomposition

François-Xavier Joly, Sylvain Coq, Mathieu Coulis, Johanne Nahmani & Stephan Hattenschwiler
1. In many terrestrial ecosystems, detritivorous soil organisms ingest large amounts of leaf litter returning most of it to the soil as faeces. Such conversion of leaf litter into faeces may stimulate decomposition by increasing the surface area available for microbial colonization. Yet, experimental support for either the outcome or the mechanism of these conversion effects is lacking. 2. Based on the hypothesis that the identity of plant species from which leaf litter is transformed...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    15

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    15

Affiliations

  • University of Stirling
    15
  • UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    2
  • University of Glasgow
    2
  • University of Dundee
    2
  • Forest Research
    2
  • Bangor University
    1
  • National Human Genome Research Institute
    1
  • Lincoln Park Zoo
    1
  • University of Strathclyde
    1
  • University of Kent
    1