12 Works

Data and R-code from 'Mode of death and mortality risk factors in Amazon trees'. Nature communications. 2020

Adriane Esquivel Muelbert, Oliver L. Phillips, Roel J. W. Brienen, Sophie Fauset, Martin J. P. Sullivan, Timothy R. Baker, Kuo-Jung Chao, Ted R. Feldpausch, Emanuel Gloor, Niro Higuchi, Jeanne Houwing-Duistermaat, Jon Lloyd, Haiyan Liu, Yadvinder Malhi, Beatriz Marimon, Ben Hur Marimon Junior, Abel Monteagudo-Mendoza, Lourens Poorter, Marcos Silveira, Emilio Vilanova Torre, Esteban Alvarez Dávila, Jhon del Aguila Pasquel, Everton Almeida, Patricia Alvarez Loayza & Ana Andrade

A “Dirty” Footprint: Soil macrofauna biodiversity and fertility in Amazonian Dark Earths and adjacent soils

Wilian C. Demetrio, Ana C. Conrado, Agno N. S. Acioli, Alexandre C. Ferreira, Marie L. C. Bartz, Samuel W. James, Elodie Silva, Lilianne S. Maia, Gilvan C. Martins, Rodrigo S. Macedo, David W. G. Stanton, Patrick Lavelle, Elena Velasquez, Anne Zangerlé, Rafaella Barbosa, Sandra C. Tapia‐Coral, Aleksander W. Muniz, Alessandra Santos, Talita Ferreira, Rodrigo F. Segalla, Thibaud Decaëns, Herlon S. Nadolny, Clara P. Peña‐Venegas, Cláudia M. B. F. Maia, Amarildo Pasini … & George G. Brown
Amazonian rainforests once thought to hold an innate pristine wilderness, are increasingly known to have been densely inhabited by populations showing a diverse and complex cultural background prior to European arrival. To what extent these societies impacted their landscape is unclear. Amazonian Dark Earths (ADEs) are fertile soils found throughout the Amazon Basin, created by pre-Columbian societies as a result of more sedentary habits. Much is known of the chemistry of these soils, yet their...

Species abundances and functional traits data of frog assemblages in Amazonian forests (Tapajós FLONA and Alter do Chão village, Brazil)

Kelly Torralvo, Rafael De Fraga, Albertina Lima & William Magnusson
We sampled frogs along an edaphic and vegetation-structure gradient in the Brazilian Amazon. We sampled 33 plots organized in four modules (with 10, 6, 8 and 9 plots). Environmental data are composed of are litter depht(cm), distance to water bodies (m), temperature (ºC), vegetation structure (PCA axis), soil sand and silt content (g-kg), and proportion of the area deforested. Additionally, we measured snout-vent length (SVL) and leg length relative to SVL and evaluated the effects...

Data from: Leaf development and demography explain photosynthetic seasonality in Amazon evergreen forests

Jin Wu, Loren P. Albert, Aline P. Lopes, Natalia Restrepo-Coupe, Matthew Hayek, Kenia T. Wiedemann, Kaiyu Guan, Scott C. Stark, Bradley Christoffersen, Neill Prohaska, Julia V. Tavares, Suelen Marostica, Hideki Kobayashi, Mauricio L. Ferreira, Kleber Silva Campos, Rodrigo Da Silva, Paulo M. Brando, Dennis G. Dye, Travis E. Huxman, Alfredo R. Huete, Bruce W. Nelson & Scott R. Saleska
In evergreen tropical forests, the extent, magnitude, and controls on photosynthetic seasonality are poorly resolved and inadequately represented in Earth system models. Combining camera observations with ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes at forests across rainfall gradients in Amazônia, we show that aggregate canopy phenology, not seasonality of climate drivers, is the primary cause of photosynthetic seasonality in these forests. Specifically, synchronization of new leaf growth with dry season litterfall shifts canopy composition toward younger, more light-use...

An empirical evaluation of camera trap study design: how many, how long, and when?

Roland Kays, Brian Arbogast, Megan Baker-Whatton, Chris Beirne, Hailey Boone, Mark Bowler, Santiago Burneo, Michael Cove, Ping Ding, Santiago Espinosa, André Gonçalves, Christopher Hansen, Patrick Jansen, Joseph Kolowski, Travis Knowles, Marcela Lima, Joshua Millspaugh, William McShea, Krishna Pacifici, Arielle Parsons, Brent Pease, Francesco Rovero, Fernanda Santos, Stephanie Schuttler, Douglas Sheil … & Wilson Spironello
1. Camera traps deployed in grids or stratified random designs are a well-established survey tool for wildlife but there has been little evaluation of study design parameters. 2. We used an empirical subsampling approach involving 2225 camera deployments run at 41 study areas around the world to evaluate three aspects of camera trap study design (number of sites, duration and season of sampling) and their influence on the estimation of three ecological metrics (species richness,...

Data from: Age‐dependent leaf physiology and consequences for crown‐scale carbon uptake during the dry season in an Amazon evergreen forest

Loren P. Albert, Jin Wu, Neill Prohaska, Plinio Barbosa De Camargo, Travis E. Huxman, Edgard S. Tribuzy, Valeriy Y. Ivanov, Rafael S. Oliveira, Sabrina Garcia, Marielle N. Smith, Raimundo Cosme Oliveira Junior, Natalia Restrepo-Coupe, Rodrigo Da Silva, Scott C. Stark, Giordane A. Martins, Deliane V. Penha & Scott R. Saleska
* Satellite and tower-based metrics of forest-scale photosynthesis generally increase with dry season progression across central Amazônia, but the underlying mechanisms lack consensus. * We conducted demographic surveys of leaf age composition, and measured age-dependence of leaf physiology in broadleaf canopy trees of abundant species at a central eastern Amazon site. Using a novel leaf-to-branch scaling approach, we used this data to independently test the much-debated hypothesis—arising from satellite and tower-based observations—that leaf phenology could...

Data from: Hydrological niche segregation defines forest structure and drought tolerance strategies in a seasonal Amazon forest

Mauro Brum, Matthew A. Vadeboncoeur, Valeriy Ivanov, Heidi Asbjornsen, Scott Saleska, Luciana F. Alves, Deliane Penha, Jadson D. Dias, Luiz E.O.C. Aragão, Fernanda Barros, Paulo Bittencourt, Luciano Pereira & Rafael S. Oliveira
1) Understanding if and how trees coordinate rooting depth and aboveground hydraulic traits to define drought-resistance strategies in seasonal Amazon forests is a major gap to model parametrization aimed at predicting the effects of climate change in these ecosystems. 2) We assessed the rooting depth of 12 dominant tree species (representing ~ 42% of the forest basal area) in a seasonal Amazon forest, using the stable isotope ratios (δ18O and δ²H) of water collected from...

Data from: Functional extinction of birds drives rapid evolutionary changes in seed size.

Mauro Galetti, Roger Guevara, Marina C. Côrtes, Fadini Rodrigo, Sandro Von Matter, Abraão B. Leite, Fábio Labecca, Thiago Ribeiro, Carolina S. Carvalho, Rosane G. Collevatti, Mathias M. Pires, , Pedro H. Brancalion, Milton C. Ribeiro & Pedro Jordano
Local extinctions have cascading effects on ecosystem functions, yet little is known about the potential for the rapid evolutionary change of species in human-modified scenarios. We show that the functional extinction of large-gape seed dispersers in the Brazilian Atlantic forest is associated with the consistent reduction of seed size of a keystone palm species. Among 22 palm populations, areas deprived of large avian frugivores for several decades present smaller seeds than non-defaunated forests, with negative...

Data from: A standardized assessment of forest mammal communities reveals consistent functional composition and vulnerability across the tropics

Francesco Rovero, Jorge Ahumada, Patrick Jansen, Douglas Sheil, Patricia Alvarez, Kelly Boekee, Santiago Espinosa, Marcela Lima, Emanuel Martin, Timothy O’Brien, Julia Salvador, Fernanda Santos, Melissa Rosa, Alexander Zvoleff, Chris Sutherland & Simone Tenan
Understanding global diversity patterns has benefitted from a focus on functional traits and how they relate to variation in environmental conditions among assemblages. Distant communities in similar environments often share characteristics, and for tropical forest mammals, this functional trait convergence has been demonstrated at coarse scales (110-200 km resolution), but less is known about how these patterns manifest at fine scales, where local processes (e.g., habitat features and anthropogenic activities) and biotic interactions occur. Here,...

Data from: Habitat amount hypothesis and passive sampling explain mammal species composition in Amazonian river islands

Rafael M. Rabelo, Susan Aragón, Júlio César Bicca-Marques & Bruce W. Nelson.
Nested structures of species assemblages have been frequently associated with patch size and isolation, leading to the conclusion that colonization-extinction dynamics drives nestedness. The ‘passive sampling’ model states that the regional abundance of species randomly determines their occurrence in patches. The ‘habitat amount hypothesis’ also challenges patch size and isolation effects, arguing that they occur because of a 'sample area effect'. Here we (1) ask whether the structure of the mammal assemblages of fluvial islands...

Data from: The fate of phosphorus fertilizer in Amazon soya bean fields

Shelby H. Riskin, Stephen Porder, Christopher Neill, Adelaine Michela E Silva Figueira, Carmen Tubbesing & Natalie Mahowald
Fertilizer-intensive soya bean agriculture has recently expanded in southeastern Amazônia, and whereas intensive fertilizer use in the temperate zone has led to widespread eutrophication of freshwater ecosystems, the effects in tropical systems are less well understood. We examined the fate of fertilizer P by comparing P forms and budgets across a chronosequence of soya bean fields (converted to soya beans between 2003 and 2008) and forests on an 800 km2 soya bean farm in Mato...

Phylogeny and biogeographic history of the Chiropotes (Pitheciidae, Platyrrhini)

Jeferson Carneiro, Iracilda Sampaio, Jose De Sousa E Silva Junior, Antonio Martins-Junior, Izeni Farias, Tomas Hrbek, Jean Boubli & Horacio Schneider
Pitheciidae is a New Word primate family composed of two subfamilies (Callicebinae and Pitheciinae). The three extant pitheciine genera, Pithecia, Cacajao and Chiropotes are all endemic to the Amazon region. Because of the uncertainties about intraspecific relationships, we reviewed the systematics and taxonomy of the genus Chiropotes. The phylogenetic analyses were performed based on Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference, while species delimitation analyses were carried out using multispecies coalescent methods. In addition, we estimated genetic...

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