313 Works

Assessing seasonal demographic covariation to understand environmental-change impacts on a hibernating mammal

Maria Paniw, Dylan Childs, Kenneth Armitage, Daniel Blumstein, Julien Martin, Madan Oli & Arpat Ozgul
Natural populations are exposed to seasonal variation in environmental factors that simultaneously affect several demographic rates (survival, development, reproduction). The resulting covariation in these rates determines population dynamics, but accounting for its numerous biotic and abiotic drivers is a significant challenge. Here, we use a factor-analytic approach to capture partially unobserved drivers of seasonal population dynamics. We use 40 years of individual-based demography from yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventer) to fit and project population models that...

BCI 50-ha Plot Taxonomy

Richard Condit, Rolando Pérez, Salomón Aguilar, Suzanne Lao, Robin Foster & Hubbell Stephen
BCI 50-ha Plot Taxonomy The 50-ha plot at Barro Colorado Island was initially demarcated and fully censused in 1982, and has been fully censused 7 times since, every 5 years from 1985 through 2015 (Hubbell and Foster 1983, Hubbell et al. 1990, Condit et al. 2012, Condit et al. 2017). The taxonomic component required repeated collecting and sorting so that every individual could be matched to a previously described species from Croat (1978). Over 300...

Data from: Complex patterns of sex-biased demography in canines

Tanya N. Phung, Robert K. Wayne, Melissa A. Wilson & Kirk E. Lohmueller
The demographic history of dogs is complex, involving multiple bottlenecks, admixture events and artificial selection. However, existing genetic studies have not explored variance in the number of reproducing males and females, and whether it has changed across evolutionary time. While male-biased mating practices, such as male-biased migration and multiple paternity, have been observed in wolves, recent breeding practices could have led to female-biased mating patterns in breed dogs. For example, breed dogs are thought to...

Data from: Ecological drivers of avian community assembly along a tropical elevation gradient

Flavia A. Montaño-Centellas, Bette A. Loiselle & Morgan W. Tingley
Community assembly theory hypothesizes that two main niche-based processes act to shape composition and organization of biological assemblages: abiotic filtering and biological interactions. Here, we conducted repeated surveys of bird abundance along an undisturbed elevational gradient in the tropical Andes to investigate (1) signals of deterministic processes driving community assembly and (2) potential mechanisms by which these forces operate (temperature, habitat complexity, fruit and insect availability), while correcting for imperfect detection and modeling species abundances...

Filtered SNP tables - Rangewide, Hamilton, Tejon, and Madera transects

Paul Gugger, Sorel Fitz-Gibbon, Ana Albarrán-Lara, Jessica Wright & Victoria Sork
Understanding how the environment shapes genetic variation provides critical insight about the evolution of local adaptation in natural populations. At multiple spatial scales and multiple geographic contexts within a single species, such information could address a number of fundamental questions about the scale of local adaptation and whether or not the same loci are involved at different spatial scales or geographic contexts. We used landscape genomic approaches from three local elevational transects and range-wide sampling...

Avian point-counts from Rhode Island and Connecticut used to test species distribution models

Valerie Steen, Morgan Tingley, Peter Paton & Chris Elphick
Spatial-biases are a common feature of presence-absence data from citizen scientists. Spatial thinning can mitigate errors in species distribution models (SDMs) that use these data. When detections or non-detections are rare, however, SDMs may suffer from class imbalance or low sample size of the minority (i.e. rarer) class. Poor predictions can result, the severity of which may vary by modeling technique. To explore the consequences of spatial bias and class imbalance in presence-absence data, we...

Longitudinal white-matter abnormalities in sports-related concussion: a diffusion MRI study of the NCAA-DoD CARE Consortium

Yu-Chien Wu, Jaroslaw Harezlak, Nahla Elsaid, Zikai Lin, Qiuting Wen, Sourajit Mustafi, Larry Riggen, Kevin Koch, Andrew Nencka, Timothy Meier, Andrew Mayer, Yang Wang, Christopher Giza, John DiFiori, Kevin Guskiewicz, Jason Mihalik, Stephen LaConte, Stefan Duma, Steven Broglio, Andrew Saykin, Michael McCrea & Thomas McAllister
Objective To study longitudinal recovery trajectories of white-matter after sports-related concussion (SRC), we performed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) on collegiate athletes who sustained SRC. Methods Collegiate athletes (n=219, 82 concussed athletes, 68 contact-sport controls, and 69 non-contact-sport controls) were included from the Concussion Assessment, Research and Education (CARE) Consortium. The participants completed clinical assessments and DTI at four time points: 24-48-hours post-injury, asymptomatic state, seven days following return-to-play, and six-months post-injury. Tract-based spatial statistics were...

Data from: Estimating diversification rates on incompletely-sampled phylogenies: theoretical concerns and practical solutions

Jonathan Chang, Daniel L. Rabosky & Michael E. Alfaro
Molecular phylogenies are a key source of information about the tempo and mode of species diversification. However, most empirical phylogenies do not contain representatives of all species, such that diversification rates are typically estimated from incompletely sampled data. Most researchers recognize that incomplete sampling can lead to biased rate estimates, but the statistical properties of methods for accommodating incomplete sampling remain poorly known. In this point of view, we demonstrate theoretical concerns with the widespread...

Data from: Genetic subdivision and candidate genes under selection in North American gray wolves

Rena M. Schweizer, Bridgett M. VonHoldt, Ryan Harrigan, James C. Knowles, Marco Musiani, David Coltman, John Novembre & Robert K. Wayne
Previous genetic studies of the highly mobile gray wolf (Canis lupus) found population structure that coincides with habitat and phenotype differences. We hypothesized that these ecologically distinct populations (ecotypes) should exhibit signatures of selection in genes related to morphology, coat color, and metabolism. To test these predictions, we quantified population structure related to habitat using a genotyping array to assess variation in 42,036 SNPs in 111 North American gray wolves. Using these SNP data and...

Data from: Validation of network communicability metrics for the analysis of brain structural networks.

Jennifer Andreotti, Kay Jann, Lester Melie-Garcia, Stéphanie Giezendanner, Eugenio Abela, Roland Wiest, Thomas Dierks & Andrea Federspiel
Computational network analysis provides new methods to analyze the brain's structural organization based on diffusion imaging tractography data. Networks are characterized by global and local metrics that have recently given promising insights into diagnosis and the further understanding of psychiatric and neurologic disorders. Most of these metrics are based on the idea that information in a network flows along the shortest paths. In contrast to this notion, communicability is a broader measure of connectivity which...

Data from: Defectors cannot be detected during \"small talk\" with strangers

Joseph H. Manson, Matthew M. Gervais & Michelle A. Kline
To account for the widespread human tendency to cooperate in one-shot social dilemmas, some theorists have proposed that cooperators can be reliably detected based on ethological displays that are difficult to fake. Experimental findings have supported the view that cooperators can be distinguished from defectors based on “thin slices” of behavior, but the relevant cues have remained elusive, and the role of the judge's perspective remains unclear. In this study, we followed triadic conversations among...

Data from: Reproductive interference explains persistence of aggression between species

Jonathan P. Drury, Kenichi W. Okamoto, Christopher N. Anderson & Gregory F. Grether
Interspecific territoriality occurs when individuals of different species fight over space, and may arise spontaneously when populations of closely related territorial species first come into contact. But defence of space is costly, and unless the benefits of excluding heterospecifics exceed the costs, natural selection should favour divergence in competitor recognition until the species no longer interact aggressively. Ordinarily males of different species do not compete for mates, but when males cannot distinguish females of sympatric...

Data from: Crowdsourced geometric morphometrics enable rapid large-scale collection and analysis of phenotypic data

Jonathan Chang & Michael E. Alfaro
1. Advances in genomics and informatics have enabled the production of large phylogenetic trees. However, the ability to collect large phenotypic datasets has not kept pace. 2. Here, we present a method to quickly and accurately gather morphometric data using crowdsourced image-based landmarking. 3. We find that crowdsourced workers perform similarly to experienced morphologists on the same digitization tasks. We also demonstrate the speed and accuracy of our method on seven families of ray-finned fishes...

Data from: Simulation as a new tool to establish benchmark outcome measures in obstetrics

Matt M. Kurrek, Pamela Morgan, Steven Howard, Peter Kranke, Aaron Calhoun, Joshua Hui & Alex Kiss
Background: There are not enough clinical data from rare critical events to calculate statistics to decide if the management of actual events might be below what could reasonably be expected (i.e. was an outlier). Objectives: In this project we used simulation to describe the distribution of management times as an approach to decide if the management of a simulated obstetrical crisis scenario could be considered an outlier. Design: Twelve obstetrical teams managed 4 scenarios that...

Data from: Social associations between California sea lions influence the use of a novel foraging ground

Zachary A. Schakner, Daniel T. Blumstein & Matthew B. Petelle
Social relationships define an individual's position in its social network, which can influence the acquisition and spread of information and behavioural variants through the population. Thus, when nuisance behaviours spread through wildlife populations, identifying central individuals may provide valuable insights for problem-species management. We studied the effects of network position on California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) discovery and foraging success at a novel foraging ground—the salmonids that aggregate at the Bonneville Dam tail-race, 235 km...

Data from: Cambrian origin of the CYP27C1-mediated vitamin A1-to-A2 switch, a key mechanism of vertebrate sensory plasticity

Ala Morshedian, Matthew B. Toomey, Gabriel E. Pollock, Rikard Frederiksen, Jennifer M. Enright, Stephen D. McCormick, M. Carter Cornwall, Gordon L. Fain & Joseph C. Corbo
The spectral composition of ambient light varies across both space and time. Many species of jawed vertebrates adapt to this variation by tuning the sensitivity of their photoreceptors via the expression of CYP27C1, an enzyme that converts vitamin A1 into vitamin A2, thereby shifting the ratio of vitamin A1-based rhodopsin to red-shifted vitamin A2-based porphyropsin in the eye. Here, we show that the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a jawless vertebrate that diverged from jawed vertebrates...

Menin Associates with the Mitotic Spindle and is Important for Cell Division

Jorge Torres, Mark Sawicki & Ankur Gholkar
Menin is the protein mutated in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome and their corresponding sporadic tumor counterparts. Here, we have uncovered a novel function for menin in promoting proper cell division. We show that menin localizes to the mitotic spindle poles and the mitotic spindle during early mitosis and to the intercellular bridge microtubules during cytokinesis in HeLa cells. Menin depletion led to defects in spindle assembly and chromosome congression during...

Data from: Temperature shapes opposing latitudinal gradients of plant taxonomic and phylogenetic β diversity

Ian R. McFadden, Brody Sandel, Constantinos Tsirogiannis, Naia Morueta-Holme, Jens-Christian Svenning, Brian J. Enquist & Nathan J. B. Kraft
Latitudinal and elevational richness gradients have received much attention from ecologists but there is little consensus on underlying causes. One possible proximate cause is increased levels of species turnover, or β diversity, in the tropics compared to temperate regions. Here, we leverage a large botanical dataset to map taxonomic and phylogenetic β diversity, as mean turnover between neighboring 100 × 100 km cells, across the Americas and determine key climatic drivers. We find taxonomic and...

Data from: Better safe than sorry: spider societies mitigate risk by prioritizing caution

Colin M. Wright, James L.L. Lichtenstein, Lauren P. Luscuskie, Graham A. Montgomery, Noa Pinter-Wollman & Jonathan N. Pruitt
Group members often vary in the information that they have about their environment. In this study, we evaluated the relative contribution of information held by the population majority vs. new immigrants to groups in determining group function. To do so we created experimental groups of the social spider Stegodyphus dumicola that were either iteratively exposed to a dangerous predator, the ant Anoplopepis custodiens, or kept in safety. We then seeded these groups (i.e., the population...

Data from: Microbial consortia controlling biogenic gas formation in the Qaidam Basin of western China

Yanhua Shuai, Shuichang Zhang, Stephen E. Grasby, Weiguo Hou, Zhuoheng Chen, Ling Huang, Mingqing Kui, Yirui Xu & Yang Wang
Knowledge of what controls the activity of subsurface microbial communities is critical for assessing and managing biogenic methane resources. In this study, 19 formation waters and five gas samples were collected at depths of 800 to 1900 m from Quaternary biogenic gas fields of the Qaidam Basin, China. The formation waters were brines with chloride (Cl) concentrations from 1200 to 2700 mM. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies ranged from 3.75 × 104 to 2.23 ×...

Data from: Hypothalamic transcriptomes of 99 mouse strains reveal trans eQTL hotspots, splicing QTLs and novel non-coding genes

Yehudit Hasin-Brumshtein, Arshad H. Khan, Farhad Hormozdiari, Calvin Pan, Brian W. Parks, Vladislav A. Petyuk, Paul D. Piehowski, Anneke Brümmer, Matteo Pellegrini, Xinshu Xiao, Eleazar Eskin, Richard D. Smith, Aldons J. Lusis & Desmond J. Smith
Previous studies had shown that integration of genome wide expression profiles, in metabolic tissues, with genetic and phenotypic variance, provided valuable insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms. We used RNA-Seq to characterize hypothalamic transcriptome in 99 inbred strains of mice from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP), a reference resource population for cardiovascular and metabolic traits. We report numerous novel transcripts supported by proteomic analyses, as well as novel non coding RNAs. High resolution genetic...

Data from: Detecting signals of chronic shedding to explain pathogen persistence: Leptospira interrogans in California sea lions

Michael G. Buhnerkempe, Katherine C. Prager, Christopher C. Strelioff, Denise J. Greig, Jeff L. Laake, Sharon R. Melin, Robert L. DeLong, Frances M. D. Gulland & James O. Lloyd-Smith
Identifying mechanisms driving pathogen persistence is a vital component of wildlife disease ecology and control. Asymptomatic, chronically infected individuals are an oft-cited potential reservoir of infection but demonstrations of the importance of chronic shedding to pathogen persistence at the population level remain scarce. Studying chronic shedding using commonly collected disease data is hampered by numerous challenges, including short-term surveillance that focuses on single epidemics and acutely ill individuals, the subtle dynamical influence of chronic shedding...

Dataset for \"Soil fluxes of carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide in a boreal forest in southern Finland\"

W. Sun, L. M. J. Kooijmans, K. Maseyk, H. Chen, I. Mammarella, T. Vesala, J. Levula, H. Keskinen & U. Seibt
This is the dataset (ver. 2017.02.13) for the manuscript "Soil fluxes of carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide in a boreal forest in southern Finland" submitted to the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

Data from: Effects of warming on predator–prey interactions – a resource-based approach and a theoretical synthesis

Wojciech Uszko, Sebastian Diehl, Göran Englund & Priyanga Amarasekare
We theoretically explore consequences of warming for predator-prey dynamics, broadening previous approaches in three ways: we include beyond-optimal temperatures, predators may have a type III functional response, and prey carrying capacity depends on explicitly modeled resources. Several robust patterns arise. The relationship between prey carrying capacity and temperature can range from near-independence to monotonically declining/increasing to hump-shaped. Predators persist in a U-shaped region in resource supply (=enrichment)-temperature space. Type II responses yield stable persistence in...

Data from: Genetic assignment with isotopes and habitat suitability (GAIAH), a migratory bird case study

Kristen C. Ruegg, Eric C. Anderson, Ryan J. Harrigan, Kristina L. Paxton, Jeffrey F. Kelly, Frank Moore & Thomas B. Smith
1. Identifying migratory connections across the annual cycle is important for studies of migrant ecology, evolution, and conservation. While recent studies have demonstrated the utility of high-resolution SNP-based genetic markers for identifying population-specific migratory patterns, the accuracy of this approach relative to other intrinsic tagging techniques has not yet been assessed. 2. Here, using a straightforward application of Bayes' Rule, we develop a method for combining inferences from high-resolution genetic markers, stable isotopes, and habitat...

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