36 Works

Data from: Checkerboard score-area relationships reveal spatial scales of plant community structure

Gordon G. McNickle, Eric G. Lamb, Mike Lavender, , Brandon S. Schamp, Steven D. Siciliano, Richard Condit, Stephen P. Hubbell, Jennifer L. Baltzer & James F Cahill
Identifying the spatial scale at which particular mechanisms influence plant community assembly is crucial to understanding the mechanisms structuring communities. It has long been recognized that many elements of community structure are sensitive to area; however the majority of studies examining patterns of community structure use a single relatively small sampling area. As different assembly mechanisms likely cause patterns at different scales we investigate how plant species co-occurrence patterns change with sampling unit scale. We...

Data from: A mix-and-click method to measure amyloid-β concentration with sub-micromolar sensitivity

Christine Xue, Yoon Lee, Joyce Tran, Dennis Chang, Zhefeng Guo & Yoon Kyung Lee
Aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) protein plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease. Because protein aggregation is a concentration-dependent process, rigorous investigations require accurate concentration measurements. Owing to the high aggregation propensity of Aβ protein, working solutions of Aβ are typically in the low micromolar range. Therefore, an ideal Aβ quantification method requires high sensitivity without sacrificing speed and accuracy. Absorbance at 280 nm is frequently used to measure Aβ concentration, but the sensitivity is low...

Data from: Tree mortality across biomes is promoted by drought intensity, lower wood density and higher specific leaf area

Sarah Greenwood, Paloma Ruiz-Benito, Jordi Martínez-Vilalta, Francisco Lloret, Thomas Kitzberger, Craig D. Allen, Rod Fensham, Daniel C. Laughlin, Jens Kattge, Gerhard Bonisch, Nathan J. B. Kraft & Alistair S. Jump
Drought events are increasing globally, and reports of consequent forest mortality are widespread. However, due to a lack of a quantitative global synthesis, it is still not clear whether drought-induced mortality rates differ among global biomes and whether functional traits influence the risk of drought-induced mortality. To address these uncertainties, we performed a global meta-analysis of 58 studies of drought-induced forest mortality. Mortality rates were modelled as a function of drought, temperature, biomes, phylogenetic and...

Data from: Species delimitation with gene flow: a methodological comparison and population genomics approach to elucidate cryptic species boundaries in Malaysian Torrent Frogs

Kin Onn Chan, Alana M. Alexander, Jesse L. Grismer, Yong-Chao Su, Evan S.H. Quah, Rafe M. Brown, Evan S. H. Quah & L. Lee Grismer
Accurately delimiting species boundaries is a non-trivial undertaking that can have significant effects on downstream inferences. We compared the efficacy of commonly-used species delimitation methods (SDMs) and a population genomics approach based on genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to assess lineage separation in the Malaysian Torrent Frog Complex currently recognized as a single species (Amolops larutensis). First, we used morphological, mitochondrial DNA and genome-wide SNPs to identify putative species boundaries by implementing non-coalescent and coalescent-based...

Data from: Early-branching euteleost relationships: areas of congruence between concatenation and coalescent model inferences

Matthew A. Campbell, Michael E. Alfaro, Max Belasco & J. Andrés López
Phylogenetic inference based on evidence from DNA sequences has led to significant strides in the development of a stable and robustly supported framework for the vertebrate tree of life. To date, the bulk of those advances have relied on sequence data from a small number of genome regions that have proven unable to produce satisfactory answers to consistently recalcitrant phylogenetic questions. Here, we re-examine phylogenetic relationships among early-branching euteleostean fish lineages classically grouped in the...

NEXUS Head CT

Robert Rodriguez & William Mower
BackgroundClinicians, afraid of missing intracranial injuries, liberally obtain computed tomographic (CT) head imaging in blunt trauma patients. Prior work suggests that clinical criteria (NEXUS Head CT decision instrument) can reliably identify patients with important injuries, while excluding injury, and the need for imaging in many patients.MethodsWe conducted a prospective observational study of the NEXUS Head CT decision instrument (DI) that requires patients to meet eight criteria to achieve “low-risk” classification. We examined the instrument’s performance...

Data from: Population genetic and field ecological analyses return similar estimates of dispersal over space and time in an endangered amphibian

Ian J. Wang & H. Bradley Shaffer
The explosive growth of empirical population genetics has seen a proliferation of analytical methods leading to a steady increase in our ability to accurately measure key population parameters, including genetic isolation, effective population size, and gene flow in natural systems. Assuming they yield similar results, population genetic methods offer an attractive complement to, or replacement of, traditional field ecological studies. However, empirical assessments of the concordance between direct field ecological and indirect population genetic studies...

Data from: Behavioural tuning in a tropical amphibian along an altitudinal gradient

Sebastiaan W.F. Meenderink, Patricia M. Quiñones, Peter M. Narins & Sebastiaan W. F. Meenderink
Males of the Coqui treefrog, Eleutherodactylus coqui, produce a distinct two-note ‘co-qui’ advertisement call from sunset to midnight throughout most of the year. Previous work established that both the spectrotemporal aspects of the call and the frequency of highest inner-ear sensitivity changes with altitude above sea level. These variations are such that the frequency of the emitted co-note closely matches the frequency to which the inner-ear is most sensitive. Given this parallel variation, we expected...

Data from: The index case is not enough: variation among individuals, groups, and social networks modify bacterial transmission dynamics

Carl N. Keiser, Noa Pinter-Wollman, Michael J. Ziemba, Krishna S. Kothamasu & Jonathan N. Pruitt
1.The traits of the index case of an infectious disease outbreak, and the circumstances for their etiology, potentially influence the trajectory of transmission dynamics. However, these dynamics likely also depend on the traits of the individuals with whom the index case interacts. 2.We used the social spider Stegodyphus dumicola to test how the traits of the index case, group phenotypic composition, and group size interact to facilitate the transmission of a GFP-labeled cuticular bacterium. We...

Data from: An assessment of phylogenetic tools for analyzing the interplay between interspecific interactions and phenotypic evolution

Jonathan P. Drury, Gregory F. Grether, , Hélène Morlon & T Garland
Much ecological and evolutionary theory predicts that interspecific interactions often drive phenotypic diversification and that species phenotypes in turn influence species interactions. Several phylogenetic comparative methods have been developed to assess the importance of such processes in nature; however, the statistical properties of these methods have gone largely untested. Focusing mainly on scenarios of competition between closely-related species, we assess the performance of available comparative approaches for analyzing the interplay between interspecific interactions and species...

Data from: Cambrian origin of the CYP27C1-mediated vitamin A1-to-A2 switch, a key mechanism of vertebrate sensory plasticity

Ala Morshedian, Matthew B. Toomey, Gabriel E. Pollock, Rikard Frederiksen, Jennifer M. Enright, Stephen D. McCormick, M. Carter Cornwall, Gordon L. Fain & Joseph C. Corbo
The spectral composition of ambient light varies across both space and time. Many species of jawed vertebrates adapt to this variation by tuning the sensitivity of their photoreceptors via the expression of CYP27C1, an enzyme that converts vitamin A1 into vitamin A2, thereby shifting the ratio of vitamin A1-based rhodopsin to red-shifted vitamin A2-based porphyropsin in the eye. Here, we show that the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a jawless vertebrate that diverged from jawed vertebrates...

Data from: Genetic assignment with isotopes and habitat suitability (GAIAH), a migratory bird case study

Kristen C. Ruegg, Eric C. Anderson, Ryan J. Harrigan, Kristina L. Paxton, Jeffrey F. Kelly, Frank Moore & Thomas B. Smith
1. Identifying migratory connections across the annual cycle is important for studies of migrant ecology, evolution, and conservation. While recent studies have demonstrated the utility of high-resolution SNP-based genetic markers for identifying population-specific migratory patterns, the accuracy of this approach relative to other intrinsic tagging techniques has not yet been assessed. 2. Here, using a straightforward application of Bayes' Rule, we develop a method for combining inferences from high-resolution genetic markers, stable isotopes, and habitat...

Data from: Effects of warming on predator–prey interactions – a resource-based approach and a theoretical synthesis

Wojciech Uszko, Sebastian Diehl, Göran Englund & Priyanga Amarasekare
We theoretically explore consequences of warming for predator-prey dynamics, broadening previous approaches in three ways: we include beyond-optimal temperatures, predators may have a type III functional response, and prey carrying capacity depends on explicitly modeled resources. Several robust patterns arise. The relationship between prey carrying capacity and temperature can range from near-independence to monotonically declining/increasing to hump-shaped. Predators persist in a U-shaped region in resource supply (=enrichment)-temperature space. Type II responses yield stable persistence in...

Dataset for \"Soil fluxes of carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide in a boreal forest in southern Finland\"

W. Sun, L. M. J. Kooijmans, K. Maseyk, H. Chen, I. Mammarella, T. Vesala, J. Levula, H. Keskinen & U. Seibt
This is the dataset (ver. 2017.02.13) for the manuscript "Soil fluxes of carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide in a boreal forest in southern Finland" submitted to the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

Data from: Detecting signals of chronic shedding to explain pathogen persistence: Leptospira interrogans in California sea lions

Michael G. Buhnerkempe, Katherine C. Prager, Christopher C. Strelioff, Denise J. Greig, Jeff L. Laake, Sharon R. Melin, Robert L. DeLong, Frances M. D. Gulland & James O. Lloyd-Smith
Identifying mechanisms driving pathogen persistence is a vital component of wildlife disease ecology and control. Asymptomatic, chronically infected individuals are an oft-cited potential reservoir of infection but demonstrations of the importance of chronic shedding to pathogen persistence at the population level remain scarce. Studying chronic shedding using commonly collected disease data is hampered by numerous challenges, including short-term surveillance that focuses on single epidemics and acutely ill individuals, the subtle dynamical influence of chronic shedding...

Data from: Social associations between California sea lions influence the use of a novel foraging ground

Zachary A. Schakner, Daniel T. Blumstein & Matthew B. Petelle
Social relationships define an individual's position in its social network, which can influence the acquisition and spread of information and behavioural variants through the population. Thus, when nuisance behaviours spread through wildlife populations, identifying central individuals may provide valuable insights for problem-species management. We studied the effects of network position on California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) discovery and foraging success at a novel foraging ground—the salmonids that aggregate at the Bonneville Dam tail-race, 235 km...

Dataset for \"Stomatal control of leaf fluxes of carbonyl sulfide and CO2 in a Typha freshwater marsh\"

Wu Sun, Kadmiel Maseyk, Céline Lett & Ulli Seibt
This is the dataset (version 2018.05.10) for the manuscript “Stomatal control of leaf fluxes of carbonyl sulfide and CO2 in a Typha freshwater marsh” currently in review on the discussion forum of the journal Biogeosciences.

Data from: Genomic divergence across ecological gradients in the Central African rainforest songbird (Andropadus virens)

Ying Zhen, Ryan J. Harrigan, Kristen C. Ruegg, Eric C. Anderson, Thomas C. Ng, Sirena Lao, Kirk E. Lohmueller & Thomas B. Smith
The little greenbul, a common rainforest passerine from sub-Saharan Africa, has been the subject of long-term evolutionary studies to understand the mechanisms leading to rainforest speciation. Previous research found morphological and behavioural divergence across rainforest–savannah transition zones (ecotones), and a pattern of divergence with gene flow suggesting divergent natural selection has contributed to adaptive divergence and ecotones could be important areas for rainforests speciation. Recent advances in genomics and environmental modelling make it possible to...

Data from: The roles of geography and environment in divergence within and between two closely related plant species inhabiting an island-like habitat

Artur Maria Wanderley, Isabel Cristina Sobreira Machado, Erton Mendonça De Almeida, Leonardo Pessoa Felix, Leonardo Galetto, Ana Maria Benko-Iseppon, Victoria L. Sork & Artur Maia Wanderley
Aim: In island-like habitats, geographic isolation facilitates population and species divergence by constraining gene flow, while environmental isolation can enhance divergence. We tested the relative contribution of geographic and environmental isolation in genetic and phenotypic divergence within and between two species of the figwort Ameroglossum (Scrophulariaceae) inhabiting spatially isolated habitats, known as inselbergs. Location: Borborema Plateau, north-eastern Brazil. Methods: Multivariate models of redundancy (RDAs) and partial redundancy analyses (pRDAs) were used to partition the geographic...

Data from: The statistical mechanics of human weight change

John C. Lang, Hans De Sterck & Daniel M. Abrams
Over the past 35 years there has been a near doubling in the worldwide prevalence of obesity. Body Mass Index (BMI) distributions in high-income societies have increasingly shifted rightwards, corresponding to increases in average BMI that are due to well-studied changes in the socioeconomic environment. However, in addition to this shift, BMI distributions have also shown marked changes in their particular shape over time, exhibiting an ongoing right-skewed broadening that is not well understood. Here,...

Data from: Marine biodiversity at the end of the world: Cape Horn and Diego Ramírez islands

Alan M. Friedlander, Enric Ballesteros, Tom W. Bell, Jonatha Giddens, Brad Henning, Mathias Hüne, Alex Muñoz, Pelayo Salinas-De-León & Enric Sala
The vast and complex coast of the Magellan Region of extreme southern Chile possesses a diversity of habitats including fjords, deep channels, and extensive kelp forests, with a unique mix of temperate and sub-Antarctic species. The Cape Horn and Diego Ramírez archipelagos are the most southerly locations in the Americas, with the southernmost kelp forests, and some of the least explored places on earth. The giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera plays a key role in structuring...

Data from: Simultaneous synergist, antagonistic, and additive interactions between multiple local stressors all degrade algal turf communities on coral reefs

Caitlin R. Fong, Sarah J. Bittick & Peggy Fong
1.Ecological communities are subjected to multiple anthropogenic stressors at both global and local scales that are increasing in number and magnitude. Stressors can interact in complex ways, and are classified as additive, synergistic, or antagonistic; the nature of the interaction is key to predicting changes and understanding community resilience. Coral reefs are among the most impacted communities and have shifted from coral- to algal-dominated states, and overfishing, nutrient enrichment, and sedimentation are local stressors that...

Data from: Feeding capability in the extinct giant Siamogale melilutra and comparative mandibular biomechanics of living Lutrinae

Z. Jack Tseng, Denise F. Su, Xiaoming Wang, Stuart C. White & Xueping Ji
At 50 kg in estimated weight, the extinct Siamogale melilutra is larger than all living otters, and ranks among the largest fossil otters. The biomechanical capability of S. melilutra jaws as related to their large size is unknown but crucial to reconstructing the species’ potentially unique ecological niche. Here we compare the mandibular biomechanics of S. melilutra using engineering-based performance measures against ten extant otter biomechanical models. Despite a wide range of feeding preferences from...

Data from: Comparing forest structure and biodiversity on private and public land: secondary tropical dry forests in Costa Rica

Moana McClellan, Rebecca Montgomery, Kristen Nelson & Justin Becknell
Secondary forests constitute a substantial proportion of tropical forestlands. These forests occur on both public and private lands and different underlying environmental variables and management regimes may affect post‐abandonment successional processes and resultant forest structure and biodiversity. We examined whether differences in ownership led to differences in forest structure, tree diversity, and tree species composition across a gradient of soil fertility and forest age. We collected soil samples and surveyed all trees in 82 public...

Data from: Issues and perspectives in species delimitation using phenotypic data: Atlantean evolution in Darwin's finches

Carlos Daniel Cadena, Felipe Zapata & Iván Jiménez
Progress in the development and use of methods for species delimitation employing phenotypic data lags behind conceptual and practical advances in molecular genetic approaches. The basic evolutionary model underlying the use of phenotypic data to delimit species assumes random mating and quantitative polygenic traits, so that phenotypic distributions within a species should be approximately normal for individuals of the same sex and age. Accordingly, two or more distinct normal distributions of phenotypic traits suggest the...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    36

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    36

Affiliations

  • University of California Los Angeles
    36
  • University of California System
    3
  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • Rice University
    1
  • University of Liège
    1
  • Wilfrid Laurier University
    1
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    1
  • Northwestern University
    1
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    1