44 Works

Data from: Underlying mechanisms and ecological context of variation in exploratory behavior of the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile

Hannah Page, Andrew Sweeney, Anna Pilko & Noa Pinter-Wollman
Uncovering how and why animals explore their environment is fundamental for understanding population dynamics, the spread of invasive species, species interactions, etc. In social animals, individuals within a group can vary in their exploratory behavior, and the behavioral composition of the group can determine its collective success. Workers of the invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) exhibit individual variation in exploratory behavior, which affects the colony’s collective nest selection behavior. Here, we examine the mechanisms underlying...

Data from: Evaluating the potential for pre-zygotic isolation and hybridization between landlocked and anadromous alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) following secondary contact

Katherine A. Littrell, David Ellis, Stephen R. Gephard, Andrew D. MacDonald, Eric P. Palkovacs, Katherine Scranton & David M. Post
The recent increase of river restoration projects is altering habitat connectivity for many aquatic species, increasing the chance that previously isolated populations will come into secondary contact. Anadromous and landlocked alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) are currently undergoing secondary contact as a result of a fishway installation at Rogers Lake in Old Lyme, Connecticut. To determine the degree of pre-zygotic isolation and potential for hybridization between alewife life history forms, we constructed spawning time distributions for two...

Data from: Dry-season decline in tree sapflux is correlated with leaf turgor loss point in a tropical rainforest

Isabelle Maréchaux, Damien Bonal, Megan K. Bartlett, Benoît Burban, Sabrina Coste, Elodie A. Courtois, Maguy Dulormne, Jean-Yves Goret, Eléonore Mira, Ariane Mirabel, Lawren Sack, Clément Stahl & Jerome Chave
1. Water availability is a key determinant of forest ecosystem function and tree species distributions. While droughts are increasing in frequency in many ecosystems, including in the tropics, plant responses to water supply vary with species and drought intensity, and are therefore difficult to model. Based on physiological first principles, we hypothesized that trees with a lower turgor loss point (πtlp), i.e., a more negative leaf water potential at wilting, would maintain water transport for...

Data from: Natural selection interacts with recombination to shape the evolution of hybrid genomes

Molly Schumer, Chenling Xu, Daniel L Powell, Arun Durvasula, Laurits Skov, Chris Holland, John C Blazier, Sriram Sankararaman, Peter Andolfatto, Gil G Rosenthal & Molly Przeworski
To investigate the consequences of hybridization between species, we studied three replicate hybrid populations that formed naturally between two swordtail fish species, estimating their fine-scale genetic map and inferring ancestry along the genomes of 690 individuals. In all three populations, ancestry from the “minor” parental species is more common in regions of high recombination and where there is linkage to fewer putative targets of selection. The same patterns are apparent in a reanalysis of human...

Data from: An inexpensive and open-source method to study large terrestrial animal diet and behavior using time-lapse video and GPS

Carlos A. De La Rosa
1. The behavior of free-ranging animals is difficult to study, especially on the large spatial and temporal scales relevant to long-lived large species. Animal-borne video and environmental data collection systems (AVEDs) record behavior and other data in real time as animals conduct daily activities. However, few studies have combined systematically collected, long term AVED foraging data with environmental and movement data to test hypotheses on animal foraging. Additionally, AVEDs are often either prohibitively expensive, or...

Data from: Explosive diversification of marine fishes at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary

Michael E. Alfaro, Brant C. Faircloth, Richard C. Harrington, Laurie Sorenson, Matt Friedman, Christine E. Thacker, Carl H. Oliveros, David Černý & Thomas J. Near
The Cretaceous–Palaeogene (K–Pg) mass extinction is linked to the rapid emergence of ecologically divergent higher taxa (for example, families and orders) across terrestrial vertebrates, but its impact on the diversification of marine vertebrates is less clear. Spiny-rayed fishes (Acanthomorpha) provide an ideal system for exploring the effects of the K–Pg on fish diversification, yet despite decades of morphological and molecular phylogenetic efforts, resolution of both early diverging lineages and enormously diverse subclades remains problematic. Recent...

Data from: RADseq data reveal ancient, but not pervasive, introgression between Californian tree and scrub oak species (Quercus sect. Quercus: Fagaceae)

Bernard Y. Kim, Xinzeng Wei, Sorel Fitz-Gibbon, Kirk E. Lohmueller, Joaquin Ortego, Paul F. Gugger & Victoria L. Sork
A long-term debate in evolutionary biology is the extent to which reproductive isolation is a necessary element of speciation. Hybridizing plants in general are cited as evidence against this notion and oaks specifically have been used as the classic example of species maintenance without reproductive isolation. Here, we use thousands of SNPs generated by RAD sequencing to describe the phylogeny of a set of sympatric white oak species in California and then test whether these...

Data from: How well can we estimate diversity dynamics for clades in diversity decline?

Gustavo Burin, Laura R.V. Alencar, Jonathan Chang, Michael E. Alfaro, Tiago B. Quental & Laura R V Alencar
The fossil record shows that the vast majority of all species that ever existed are extinct and that most lineages go through an expansion and decline in diversity. However, macroevolutionary analyses based upon molecular phylogenies have difficulty inferring extinction dynamics, raising questions about whether the neontological record can contribute to an understanding of the decline phenomenon. Two recently developed diversification methods for molecular phylogenies (RPANDA and BAMM) incorporate models that theoretically have the capacity to...

Data from: Site-specific structural order in Alzheimer’s Aβ42 fibrils

Hongsu Wang, Yoon Kyung Lee, Christine Xue & Zhefeng Guo
Deposition of amyloid fibrils is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. Aβ42 is the major protein whose aggregation leads to the formation of these fibrils. Understanding the detailed structure of Aβ42 fibrils is of particular importance for delineating the mechanism of Aβ42 aggregation and developing specific amyloid-targeting drugs. Here we use site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to study the site-specific structural order at each and every residue position in Aβ42 fibrils. Strong...

Data from: Transcriptomic analysis of skin pigmentation variation in the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana).

Sergio F. Nigenda-Morales, Yibo Hu, James Beasley, Hugo A. Ruiz-Piña, David Valenzuela-Galván, Robert K. Wayne & James C. Beasley
Skin and coat pigmentation are two of the best-studied examples of traits under natural selection given their quantifiable fitness interactions with the environment (e.g. camouflage) and signaling with other organisms (e.g. warning coloration). Previous morphological studies have found that skin pigmentation variation in the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) is associated with variation in precipitation and temperatures across its distribution range following Gloger’s rule (lighter pigmentation in temperate environments). To investigate the molecular mechanism associated with...

Data from: Hierarchical decision-making balances current and future reproductive success

Eva Ringler, Georgine Szipl, Ryan J. Harrigan, Petra Bartl-Binder, Rosanna Mangione, Max Ringler & Perta Bartl-Binder
Parental decisions in animals are often context-dependent and shaped by fitness trade-offs between parents and offspring. For example, the selection of breeding habitats can considerably impact the fitness of both offspring and parents, and therefore parents should carefully weigh the costs and benefits of available options for their current and future reproductive success. Here we show that resource-use preferences are shaped by a trade-off between parental effort and offspring safety in a tadpole-transporting frog. In...

Data from: General trust impedes perception of self-reported primary psychopathy in thin slices of social interaction

Joseph H. Manson, Matthew M. Gervais & Gregory A. Bryant
Little is known about people’s ability to detect subclinical psychopathy from others’ quotidian social behavior, or about the correlates of variation in this ability. This study sought to address these questions using a thin slice personality judgment paradigm. We presented 108 undergraduate judges (70.4% female) with 1.5 minute video thin slices of zero-acquaintance triadic conversations among other undergraduates (targets: n = 105, 57.1% female). Judges completed self-report measures of general trust, caution, and empathy. Target...

Data from: Applying Lanchester’s laws to the interspecific competition of coral reef fish

David Černý, Kristen Lee, Jocelyn Medal & Daniel T. Blumstein
Lanchester’s laws of combat are a mathematical framework describing the relative contributions of individual fighting ability and group size to overall group fighting ability. Since 1993, several studies have attempted to apply this framework to interspecific dominance relationships between nonhuman animals. However, this prior work addressed only the corollaries of Lanchester’s laws rather than the laws themselves. Here, we directly test Lanchester’s linear and square law to explain interspecific competition of coral reef fish. First,...

Data from: A reference set of curated biomedical data and metadata from clinical case reports

J. Harry Caufield, Yijiang Zhou, Anders O. Garlid, Shaun P. Setty, David A. Liem, Quan Cao, Jessica M. Lee, Sanjana Murali, Sarah Spendlove, Wei Wang, Li Zhang, Yizhou Sun, Alex Bui, Henning Hermjakob, Karol E. Watson & Peipei Ping
Clinical case reports (CCRs) provide an important means of sharing clinical experiences about atypical disease phenotypes and new therapies. However, published case reports contain largely unstructured and heterogeneous clinical data, posing a challenge to mining relevant information. Current indexing approaches generally concern document-level features and have not been specifically designed for CCRs. To address this disparity, we developed a standardized metadata template and identified text corresponding to medical concepts within 3,100 curated CCRs spanning 15...

Data from: How to quantify animal activity from radio-frequency identification (RFID) recordings

Arne Iserbyt, Maaike Griffioen, Benny Borremans, Marcel Eens & Wendt Müller
Automated animal monitoring via radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology allows efficient and extensive data sampling of individual activity levels, and is therefore commonly used for ecological research. However, processing RFID data is still a largely unresolved problem, which potentially leads to inaccurate estimates for behavioural activity. One of the major challenges during data processing is to isolate independent behavioural actions from a set of superfluous, non-independent detections. As a case study, individual blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus)...

Data from: Collective behavior and colony persistence of social spiders depends on their physical environment

Ambika Kamath, Skylar D. Primavera, Colin M. Wright, Grant N. Doering, Kirsten A. Sheehy, Noa Pinter-Wollman & Jonathan N. Pruitt
The physical environment occupied by group-living animals can profoundly affect their cooperative social interactions and therefore their collective behavior and success. These effects can be especially apparent in human-modified habitats, which often harbor substantial variation in the physical environments available within them. For nest-building animal societies, this influence of the physical environment on collective behavior can be mediated by the construction of nests—nests could either buffer animal behavior from changes in the physical environment or...

Data from: Multifactorial processes underlie parallel opsin loss in neotropical bats

Alexa Sadier, Kalina T. J. Davies, Laurel R. Yohe, Kun Yun, Paul Donat, Brandon P. Hedrick, Elizabeth R. Dumont, Liliana M. Davalos, Stephen J. Rossiter & Karen E. Sears
The loss of previously adaptive traits is typically linked to relaxation in selection, yet the molecular steps leading to such repeated losses are rarely known. Molecular studies of loss have tended to focus on gene sequences alone, but overlooking other aspects of protein expression might underestimate phenotypic diversity. Insights based almost solely on opsin gene evolution, for instance, have made mammalian color vision a textbook example of phenotypic loss. We address this gap by investigating...

Data from: How sea-level change mediates genetic divergence in coastal species across regions with varying tectonic and sediment processes

Greer A. Dolby, Ryan A. Ellingson, Lloyd T. Findley & David K. Jacobs
Plate tectonics and sediment processes control regional continental shelf topography. We examine the genetic consequences of how glacial-associated sea-level change interacted with variable near-shore topography since the last glaciation. We reconstructed the size and distribution of areas suitable for tidal estuary formation from the Last Glacial Maximum, ~20 thousand years ago, to present from San Francisco, California, USA (~38 °N) to Reforma, Sinaloa, Mexico (~25 °N). We assessed range-wide genetic structure and diversity of three...

Data from: Evidence of host-associated divergence from coral-eating snails (genus Coralliophila) in the Coral Triangle

Sara E. Simmonds, Vincent Chou, Samantha H. Cheng, Rita Rachmawati, Hilconida P. Campulong, Paul H. Barber, Hilconida P. Calumpong & G. Ngurah Mahardika
We studied how host-associations and geography shape the genetic structure of sister species of marine snails Coralliophila radula (A. Adams, 1853) and C. violacea (Kiener, 1836). These obligate ectoparasites prey upon corals and are sympatric throughout much of their ranges in coral reefs of the tropical and subtropical Indo-Pacific. We tested for population genetic structure of snails in relation to geography and their host corals using mtDNA (COI) sequences in minimum spanning trees and AMOVAs....

Data from: Postconvulsive central apnea as a biomarker for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP)

Laura Vilella, Nuria Lacuey, Johnson P. Hampson, M.R. Sandhya Rani, Rup K. Sanju, Daniel Friedman, Maromi Nei, Kingman Strohl, Catherine Scott, Brian K. Gehlbach, Bilal Zony, Norma J. Hupp, Anita Zaremba, Nassim Shafiabadi, Xihue Zhao, Victoria Reick-Mitrisin, Stephan Schuele, Jennifer Ogren, Ronald M. Harper, Beate Diehl, Lisa Bateman, Orrin Devinsky, George B. Richerson, Philippe Ryvlin & Samden D. Lhatoo
Objective: To characterize peri-ictal apnea and post-ictal asystole in generalized convulsive seizures (GCS) of intractable epilepsy. Methods: Prospective, multi-center epilepsy monitoring study of autonomic and breathing biomarkers of SUDEP in patient’s ≥18 years old with intractable epilepsy and monitored GCS. Video EEG, thoraco-abdominal excursions, nasal airflow, capillary oxygen saturation and electrocardiography were analyzed. Results: We studied 148 GCS in 87 patients. Nineteen patients had generalized epilepsy, 65 had focal, one had both and in two,...

Data from: Contemporaneous radiations of fungi and plants linked to symbiosis

François Lutzoni, Michael D. Nowak, Michael E. Alfaro, Valérie Reeb, Jolanta Miadlikowska, Michael Krug, A. Elizabeth Arnold, Louise A. Lewis, David L. Swofford, David Hibbett, Khidir Hilu, Timothy Y. James, Dietmar Quandt & Susana Magallón
Interactions between fungi and plants, including parasitism, mutualism, and saprotrophy, have been invoked as key to their respective macroevolutionary success. Here we evaluate the origins of plant-fungal symbioses and saprotrophy using a time-calibrated phylogenetic framework that reveals linked and drastic shifts in diversification rates of each kingdom. Fungal colonization of land was associated with at least two origins of terrestrial green algae and preceded embryophytes (as evidenced by losses of fungal flagellum, ca. 720 Ma),...

Data from: Dietary specialization is linked to reduced species durations in North American fossil canids

Mairin Balisi, Corinna Casey & Blaire Van Valkenburgh
How traits influence species persistence is a fundamental question in ecology, evolution, and paleontology. We test the relationship between dietary traits and both species duration and locality coverage over 40 million years in North American canids, a clade with considerable ecomorphological disparity and a dense fossil record. Because ecomorphological generalization--broad resource use--may enable species to withstand disturbance, we predicted that canids of average size and mesocarnivory would exhibit longer durations and wider distributions than specialized...

Data from: An extensive suite of functional traits distinguishes wet and dry Hawaiian forests and enables prediction of species vital rates

Camila D. Medeiros, Christine Scoffoni, Grace John, Megan Bartlett, Faith Inman-Narahari, Rebecca Ostertag, Susan Cordell, Christian Giardina, Lawren Sack, Megan K. Bartlett & Grace P. John
1. The application of functional traits to predict and explain plant species’ distributions and vital rates has been a major direction in functional ecology for decades, yet numerous physiological traits have not yet been incorporated into the approach. 2. Using commonly measured traits such as leaf mass per area (LMA) and wood density (WD), and additional traits related to water transport, gas exchange and resource economics, including leaf vein, stomatal, and wilting traits, we tested...

Tree species abundance through time in tropical forest census plots, Panama

Richard Condit, Rolando Pérez, Salomón Aguilar, Suzanne Lao, Foster Robin & Stephen Hubbell
All trees at least 1 cm diameter at breast height were censused in three sites in Panama. The Barro Colorado plot is 50 hectares in area and was fully censused on eight occasions between 1982 and 2015. The Sherman plot is 5.96 hectares and was fully censuses four times between 1996 and 2009. The Cocoli plot is 4 hectares and was censused three times between 1994 and 1999. The three accompanying tables give the population...

Data from: Globally consistent impact of tropical cyclones on the structure of tropical and subtropical forests

Thomas Ibanez, Gunnar Keppel, Christophe Menkes, Thomas W. Gillespie, Matthieu Lengaigne, Morgan Mangeas, Gonzalo Rivas-Torres & Philippe Birnbaum
1. Tropical cyclones (TCs) are large-scale disturbances that regularly impact tropical forests. Although long-term impacts of TCs on forest structure have been proposed, a global test of the relationship between forest structure and TC frequency and intensity is lacking. We test on a pantropical scale whether TCs shape the structure of tropical and subtropical forests in the long-term. 2. We compiled forest structural features (stem density, basal area, mean canopy height and maximum tree size)...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    44

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    44

Affiliations

  • University of California Los Angeles
    44
  • Princeton University
    3
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    3
  • University of California System
    3
  • Duke University
    3
  • University of Cambridge
    3
  • University of Sao Paulo
    3
  • University of Vienna
    3
  • Yale University
    3
  • University of Antwerp
    2