35 Works

Data from: Parasite load and MHC diversity in undisturbed and agriculturally modified habitats of the ornate dragon lizard

Jacek Radwan, Katarzyna Kuduk, Esther Levy, Natasha LeBas & Wieslaw Babik
MHC gene polymorphism is thought to be driven by host-parasite coevolution, but the evidence for an association between the selective pressure from parasites and the number of MHC alleles segregating in a population is scarce and inconsistent. Here, we characterized MHC class I polymorphism in a lizard whose habitat preferences (rock outcrops) lead to the formation of well-defined and stable populations. We investigated the association between the load of ticks, which were used as a...

Data from: Mating portfolios: bet-hedging, sexual selection and female multiple mating

Francisco Garcia-Gonzalez, Jonathan P. Evans & Yukio Yasui
Polyandry (female multiple mating) has profound evolutionary and ecological implications. Despite considerable work devoted to understanding why females mate multiply, we currently lack convincing empirical evidence to explain the adaptive value of polyandry. Here, we provide a direct test of the controversial idea that bet-hedging functions as a risk-spreading strategy that yields multi-generational fitness benefits to polyandrous females. Unfortunately, testing this hypothesis is far from trivial, and the empirical comparison of the across-generations fitness payoffs...

Data from: Correlated evolution of sexual dimorphism and male dimorphism in a clade of neotropical harvestmen

Bruno Alves Buzatto, Joseph L. Tomkins, Leigh W. Simmons & Glauco Machado
Secondary sexual traits increase male fitness, but may be maladaptive in females, generating intralocus sexual conflict that is ameliorated through sexual dimorphism. Sexual selection on males may also lead some males to avoid expenditure on secondary sexual traits and achieve copulations using alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs). Secondary sexual traits can increase or decrease fitness in males, depending on which ART they employ, generating intralocus tactical conflict that can be ameliorated through male dimorphism. Due to...

Data from: Female effects, but no intrinsic male effects on paternity outcome in crickets

Leigh W. Simmons, Maxine Lovegrove & Maria Almbro
Competitive fertilization success can depend on the relative abilities of competing males to fertilize available ova, and on mechanisms of cryptic female choice that moderate paternity. Competitive fertilization success is thus an emergent property of competing male genotypes, female genotype and their interactions. Accurate estimates of intrinsic male effects on competitive fertilization success are therefore problematic. We used a cross-classified nonbreeding design in which rival male family background was standardized to partition variation in competitive...

Data from: Replicated evolutionary divergence in the cuticular hydrocarbon profile of male crickets associated with the loss of song in the Hawaiian archipelago

Leigh W. Simmons, Melissa L. Thomas, Brian Gray & Marlene Zuk
Female choice based on male secondary sexual traits is well documented, although the extent to which this selection can drive an evolutionary divergence in male traits among populations is less clear. Male field crickets Teleogryllus oceanicus attract females using a calling song and once contacted switch to courtship song to persuade them to mate. These crickets also secrete onto their cuticle a cocktail of long-chained fatty acids or cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs). Females choose among potential...

Data from: Environmental filtering explains variation in plant diversity along resource gradients

Etienne Laliberté, Graham Zemunik & Benjamin L. Turner
The mechanisms that shape plant diversity along resource gradients remain unresolved because competing theories have been evaluated in isolation. By testing multiple theories simultaneously across a >2-million-year dune chronosequence in an Australian biodiversity hotspot, we show that variation in plant diversity is not explained by local resource heterogeneity, resource partitioning, nutrient stoichiometry, or soil fertility along this strong resource gradient. Rather, our results suggest that diversity is determined by environmental filtering from the regional flora,...

Data from: Male sperm storage compromises sperm motility in guppies

Clelia Gasparini, Jennifer L. Kelley & Jonathan P. Evans
Sperm senescence can have important evolutionary implications due to its deleterious effects on sperm quality and offspring performance. Consequently, it has been argued that polyandry (female multiple mating) may facilitate the selection of younger, and therefore competitively superior, sperm when ejaculates from multiple males compete for fertilization. Surprisingly, however, unequivocal evidence that sperm ageing influences traits that underlie sperm competitiveness is lacking. Here, we used a paired experimental design that compares sperm quality between ‘old’...

Data from: Reading the leaves: a comparison of leaf rank and automated areole measurement for quantifying aspects of leaf venation

Walton A. Green, Stefan A. Little, Charles A. Price, Scott L. Wing, Selena Y. Smith, Benjamin Kotrc & Gabriela Doria
The reticulate venation that is characteristic of a dicot leaf has excited interest from systematists for more than a century, and from physiological and developmental botanists for decades. The tools of digital image acquisition and computer image analysis, however, are only now approaching the sophistication needed to quantify aspects of the venation network found in real leaves quickly, easily, accurately, and reliably enough to produce biologically meaningful data. In this paper, we examine 120 leaves...

Data from: Population genetic structure of the Pocillopora damicornis morphospecies along Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia

Luke Thomas, G. A. Kendrick, M. Stat, K. L. Travaille, G. Shedrawi, W. J. Kennington, GA Kendrick, KL Travaille & WJ Kennington
The effective management of a coral reef system relies on a detailed understanding of the population structure of dominant habitat-forming species. For some corals, however, high levels of phenotypic plasticity have made species delineation based on morphological characteristics alone unreliable, suggesting that previous studies of population genetic structure may have been influenced by the inclusion of multiple genetic lineages in the analyses. We examined the population structure of the Pocillopora damicornis morphospecies along the World...

Data from: Rapid loss of behavioural plasticity and immunocompetence under intense sexual selection

Emile Van Lieshout, Kathryn Bridget McNamara & Leigh W. Simmons
Phenotypic plasticity allows animals to maximise fitness by conditionally expressing the phenotype best adapted to their environment. While evidence for such adjustment in reproductive tactics is common, little is known about how phenotypic plasticity evolves in response to sexual selection. We examined the effect of sexual selection intensity on phenotypic plasticity in mating behaviour using the beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. Male genital spines harm females during mating and females exhibit copulatory kicking, an apparent resistance trait...

Data from: The role of phylogeny and ecology in shaping morphology in 21 genera and 127 species of Australo-Papuan myobatrachid frogs

M. Vidal-García, P. G. Byrne, J. D. Roberts & J. S. Keogh
Body shape is predicted to differ among species for functional reasons and in relation to environmental niche and phylogenetic history. We quantified morphological differences in shape and size among 98.5% of the 129 species and all 21 genera of the Australo-Papuan endemic myobatrachid frogs to test the hypothesis that habitat type predicts body shape in this radiation. We tested this hypothesis in a phylogenetic context at two taxonomic levels: across the entire radiation and within...

Data from: Latest Carboniferous (late Gzhelian) fusulinids from Timor Leste and their paleobiogeographic affinities

Vladimir I. Davydov, David W. Haig & Eujay McCartain
An uppermost Gzhelian bioherm discovered in the central highlands of Timor Leste contains abundant foraminifera belonging to 17 genera. Representatives of the families Biseriamminidae, Biwaellidae, Bradyinidae, Cornuspiridae, Lasiodiscidae, Palaeotextulariidae, Pseudotaxidae, Ozawainellidae, Schubertellidae, Schwagerinidae, Staffellidae and Textrataxidae are present, including 21 species referred to known types and 12 species left in open nomenclature. Two new Schwagerina species are described: Schwagerina timorensis new species, and Schwagerina maubissensis new species. The assemblage belongs to the uppermost Gzhelian Schwagerina...

Data from: Microsatellite markers from the Ion Torrent: a multi-species contrast to 454 shotgun sequencing

Carole P. Elliott, Neal J. Enright, Richard J. N. Allcock, Michael G. Gardner, Emese Meglécz, Janet Anthony & Siegfried L. Krauss
The development and screening of microsatellite markers have been accelerated by next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and in particular GS-FLX pyro-sequencing (454). More recent platforms such as the PGM semiconductor sequencer (Ion Torrent) offer potential benefits such as dramatic reductions in cost, but to date have not been well utilized. Here, we critically compare the advantages and disadvantages of microsatellite development using PGM semiconductor sequencing and GS-FLX pyro-sequencing for two gymnosperm (a conifer and a cycad)...

Data from: Are leaf functional traits “invariant” with plant size, and what is “invariance” anyway?

Charles A. Price, Ian J. Wright, David D. Ackerly, Ülo Niinemets, Peter B. Reich & Erik J. Veneklaas
Studies of size-related plant traits have established a suite of mathematical functions describing whole plant investment and allocation. In parallel, studies of plant “economic spectra” have measured the scaling and variance composition of traits related to the major dimensions of both structure and function. Here we explore the intersection of these two broad areas by exploring the notion that many leaf economic traits are invariant with species differences in adult plant size. Invariant traits are...

Data from: Using filter-based community assembly models to improve restoration outcomes

Kristin B. Hulvey & Paul A. Aigner
1. Ecological filter models derived from community assembly theory can inform restoration planning by highlighting management actions most likely to affect community composition. Despite growing interest in these models, many restoration studies solely manipulate a single filter—the biotic filter by altering interspecific competition in studies—while ignoring abiotic and dispersal filters that may also influence restoration success. 2. To examine how manipulating all three filters (biotic, abiotic, dispersal) affected restoration in an annual-type grassland, we seeded...

Data from: Complementary plant nutrient-acquisition strategies promote growth of neighbour species

François P. Teste, Erik J. Veneklaas, Kingsley W. Dixon & Hans Lambers
1. Greater understanding of positive interspecific interactions in nutrient-poor soils is a priority, particularly in phosphorus- (P) limited ecosystems where plants with contrasting nutrient-acquiring strategies co-occur. It is also relevant to agro-ecosystems, since global P stocks are being depleted. In this study, we assess positive interactions between sympatric plants with contrasting nutrient-acquiring strategies from highly P-impoverished soils from the biodiversity hotspot of south-western Australia. 2. Four plant species (Banksia menziesii, Eucalyptus marginata, Verticordia nitens, and...

Data from: Ocean-scale prediction of whale shark distribution

Ana Sequeira, Camille Mellin, David Rowat, Mark G. Meekan & Corey J. A. Bradshaw
Aim: Predicting distribution patterns of whale sharks (Rhincodon typus, Smith 1828) in the open ocean remains elusive owing to few pelagic records. We developed multivariate distribution models of seasonally variant whale shark distributions derived from tuna purse-seine fishery data. We tested the hypotheses that whale sharks use a narrow temperature range, are more abundant in productive waters and select sites closer to continents than the open ocean. Location: Indian Ocean. Methods: We compared a 17-year...

Data from: Phylogenetic diversity and coevolutionary signals among trophic levels change across a habitat edge

Guadalupe Peralta, Carol M. Frost, Raphael K. Didham, Arvind Varsani & Jason M. Tylianakis
1. Incorporating the evolutionary history of species into community ecology enhances understanding of community composition, ecosystem functioning and responses to environmental changes. 2. Phylogenetic history might partly explain the impact of fragmentation and land-use change on assemblages of interacting organisms, and even determine potential cascading effects across trophic levels. However, it remains unclear whether phylogenetic diversity of basal resources is reflected at higher trophic levels in the food web. In particular, phylogenetic determinants of community...

Data from: The role of species traits in mediating functional recovery during matrix restoration

Andrew D. Barnes, Rowan M. Emberson, Frank-Thorsten Krell & Raphael K. Didham
Reversing anthropogenic impacts on habitat structure is frequently successful through restoration, but the mechanisms linking habitat change, community reassembly and recovery of ecosystem functioning remain unknown. We test for the influence of edge effects and matrix habitat restoration on the reassembly of dung beetle communities and consequent recovery of dung removal rates across tropical forest edges. Using path modelling, we disentangle the relative importance of community-weighted trait means and functional trait dispersion from total biomass...

Data from: Local genetic patchiness but no regional differences between Indo-West Pacific populations of the dogtooth tuna Gymnosarda unicolor

Blair P. Bentley, Euan S. Harvey, Stephen J. Newman, David J. Welch, Adam K. Smith, Winn J. Kennington, DJ Welch, ES Harvey, SJ Newman, BP Bentley & WJ Kennington
Physical barriers can have profound impacts on dispersal in marine species. Here, we investigate population structure and levels of relatedness among individuals of the coral reef associated fish, the dogtooth tuna Gymnosarda unicolor, collected from 15 sites across the Indo-West Pacific region. We screened 92 individuals for genetic variation at 13 nuclear microsatellite loci and the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene. We detected no genetic differentiation between ocean basins or between...

Data from: Sediment and turbidity associated with offshore dredging increase coral disease prevalence on nearby reefs

F. Joseph Pollock, Joleah B. Lamb, Stuart N. Field, Scott F. Heron, Britta Schaffelke, George Shedrawi, David G. Bourne & Bette L. Willis
In recent decades, coral reef ecosystems have declined to the extent that reefs are now threatened globally. While many water quality parameters have been proposed to contribute to reef declines, little evidence exists conclusively linking specific water quality parameters with increased disease prevalence in situ. Here we report evidence from in situ coral health surveys confirming that chronic exposure to dredging-associated sediment plumes significantly increase the prevalence of white syndromes, a devastating group of globally...

Data from: Long-term data suggest jarrah-forest establishment at restored mine sites is resistant to climate variability

Rachel J. Standish, Matthew I. Daws, Aaron D. Gove, Raphael K. Didham, Andrew H. Grigg, John M. Koch & Richard J. Hobbs
1. Global climate change is projected to increase the frequency and intensity of drought in dry regions due to warming temperatures and declining rainfall. Severe drought can trigger tree mortality and drive persistent vegetation change. 2. To date, most empirical studies have focused on drought-induced mortality of adult trees, but this needs to be matched by similar efforts to understand drought impacts on seedling establishment if we are to understand the resilience of the world's...

Data from: Experimental evidence that even minor livestock trampling has severe effects on land snail communities in forest remnants

Lisa H. Denmead, Gary M. Barker, Rachel J. Standish & Raphael K. Didham
1. Land-use intensification is increasing dramatically in production systems world-wide. Livestock production is an important component of production land use, and increases in livestock densities have had a wide range of negative consequences. The off-site effects of livestock grazing and trampling on native vegetation adjacent to pastoral land have received less attention than on-farm effects. Moreover, where significant ecological effects of livestock spillover have been identified, the mechanistic determinants of these effects have not typically...

Data from: Experimental reduction in dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids depresses sperm competitiveness

, Clelia Gasparini, Giovanni M. Turchini & Jonathan P. Evans
The health benefits of diets containing rich sources of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA) are well documented and include reductions in the risk of several diseases typical of Western societies. The dietary intake of n-3 LC-PUFA has also been linked to fertility, and there is abundant evidence that a range of ejaculate traits linked to fertility in humans, livestock and other animals depend on an adequate intake of n-3 LC-PUFA from dietary sources....

Data from: Calibration of pelagic stereo-BRUVs and scientific longline surveys for sampling sharks

Julia Santana-Garcon, Matias Braccini, Tim J. Langlois, Stephen J. Newman, Rory B. McAuley & Euan S. Harvey
1. Our understanding of the ecology of sharks and other highly mobile marine species often relies on fishery-dependent data or extractive fishery-independent techniques that can result in catchability and size-selectivity biases. Pelagic Baited Remote Underwater stereo-Video Systems (pelagic stereo-BRUVs) provide a standardized, non-destructive and fishery-independent approach to estimate biodiversity measures of fish assemblages in the water column. However, the performance of this novel method has not yet been assessed relative to other standard sampling techniques....

Registration Year

  • 2014
    35

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    35

Affiliations

  • University of Western Australia
    35
  • Curtin University
    5
  • University of California, Davis
    3
  • Murdoch University
    2
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • University of Melbourne
    2
  • Macquarie University
    2
  • University of Göttingen
    2
  • Harvard University
    2
  • Australian Institute of Marine Science
    2