33 Works

Data from: Paternity analysis reveals wide pollen dispersal and high multiple paternity in a small isolated population of the bird-pollinated Eucalyptus caesia (Myrtaceae)

Nicole Bezemer, Siegfried L. Krauss, Ryan D. Phillips, David G. Roberts & Stephen D. Hopper
Optimal foraging behaviour by nectavores is expected to result in a leptokurtic pollen dispersal distribution and predominantly near-neighbour mating. However, complex social interactions among nectarivorous birds may result in different mating patterns to those typically observed in insect-pollinated plants. Mating system, realised pollen dispersal and spatial genetic structure were examined in the bird-pollinated Eucalyptus caesia, a species characterised by small, geographically disjunct populations. Nine microsatellite markers were used to genotype an entire adult stand and...

Data from: Genetic variation but weak genetic covariation between pre- and postcopulatory episodes of sexual selection in Drosophila melanogaster

Laura M. Travers, Francisco Garcia-Gonzalez & Leigh W. Simmons
When females mate polyandrously, male reproductive success depends both on the male's ability to attain matings and his ability to outcompete rival males in the fertilization of ova post copulation. Increased investment in ejaculate components may trade-off with investment in precopulatory traits due to resource allocation. Alternatively, pre- and postcopulatory traits could be positively related if individuals can afford to invest heavily in traits advantageous at both episodes of selection. There is empirical evidence for...

Data from: Historical processes and contemporary ocean currents drive genetic structure in the seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in the Indo-Australian Archipelago

Udhi E. Hernawan, Kor-Jent Van Dijk, Gary A. Kendrick, Ming Feng, Edward Biffin, Paul S. Lavery & Kathryn McMahon
Understanding spatial patterns of gene flow and genetic structure is essential for the conservation of marine ecosystems. Contemporary ocean currents and historical isolation due to Pleistocene sea-level fluctuations have been predicted to influence the genetic structure in marine populations. In the Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA), the world's hotspot of marine biodiversity, seagrasses are a vital component but population genetic information is very limited. Here, we reconstructed the phylogeography of the seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in the IAA...

Data from: Genetic isolation between coastal and fishery-impacted, offshore bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops spp.) populations

Simon J. Allen, Kate A. Bryant, Robert H. S. Kraus, Neil R. Loneragan, Anna M. Kopps, Alexander M. Brown, Livia Gerber & Michael Krützen
The identification of species and population boundaries is important in both evolutionary and conservation biology. In recent years, new population genetic and computational methods for estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses in a quantitative manner have emerged. Using a Bayesian framework and a quantitative model-testing approach, we evaluated the species status and genetic connectedness of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops spp.) populations off remote northwestern Australia, with a focus on pelagic 'offshore' dolphins subject to incidental capture...

Data from: Arthropod distribution in a tropical rainforest: tackling a four dimensional puzzle

Yves Basset, Lukas Cizek, Philippe Cuénoud, Raphael K. Didham, Vojtech Novotny, Frode Ødegaard, Tomas Roslin, Alexey K. Tishechkin, Jürgen Schmidl, Neville N. Winchester, David W. Roubik, Henri-Pierre Aberlenc, Johannes Bail, Héctor Barrios, Jonathan R. Bridle, Gabriela Castaño-Meneses, Bruno Corbara, Gianfranco Curletti, Wesley Duarte Da Rocha, Domir De Bakker, Jacques H.C. Delabie, Alain Dejean, Laura L. Fagan, Andreas Floren, Roger L. Kitching … & Jacques H. C. Delabie
Quantifying the spatio-temporal distribution of arthropods in tropical rainforests represents a first step towards scrutinizing the global distribution of biodiversity on Earth. To date most studies have focused on narrow taxonomic groups or lack a design that allows partitioning of the components of diversity. Here, we consider an exceptionally large dataset (113,952 individuals representing 5,858 species), obtained from the San Lorenzo forest in Panama, where the phylogenetic breadth of arthropod taxa was surveyed using 14...

Data from: Inferring contemporary and historical genetic connectivity from juveniles

Pierre Feutry, Oliver Berry, Peter M. Kyne, Richard D. Pillans, Rich Hillary, Peter M. Grewe, James R. Marthick, Grant Johnson, Rasanthi M. Gunasekera, Nicholas J. Bax, Mark Bravington & Richard M. Hillary
Measuring population connectivity is a critical task in conservation biology. While genetic markers can provide reliable long-term historical estimates of population connectivity, scientists are still limited in their ability to determine contemporary patterns of gene flow, the most practical time frame for management. Here, we tackled this issue by developing a new approach that only requires juvenile sampling at a single time period. To demonstrate the usefulness of our method, we used the Speartooth shark...

Data from: Phylogenomics provides new insight into evolutionary relationships and genealogical discordance in the reef-building coral genus Acropora

Natalie L. Rosser, Luke Thomas, Sean Stankowski, Zoe T. Richards, W. Jason Kennington & Michael S. Johnson
Understanding the genetic basis of reproductive isolation is a long-standing goal of speciation research. In recently diverged populations, genealogical discordance may reveal genes and genomic regions that contribute to the speciation process. Previous work has shown that conspecific colonies of Acropora that spawn in different seasons (spring and autumn) are associated with highly diverged lineages of the phylogenetic marker PaxC. Here, we used 10 034 single-nucleotide polymorphisms to generate a genome-wide phylogeny and compared it...

Data from: Changes in ectomycorrhizal fungal community composition and declining diversity along a 2-million-year soil chronosequence

Felipe E. Albornoz, François P. Teste, Hans Lambers, Michael Bunce, Dáithí C. Murray, Nicole E. White & Etienne Laliberté
Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal communities covary with host plant communities along soil fertility gradients, yet it is unclear whether this reflects changes in host composition, fungal edaphic specialization or priority effects during fungal community establishment. We grew two co-occurring ECM plant species (to control for host identity) in soils collected along a 2-million-year chronosequence representing a strong soil fertility gradient and used soil manipulations to disentangle the effects of edaphic properties from those due to fungal...

Data from: Population scale mapping of transposable element diversity reveals links to gene regulation and epigenomic variation

Tim Stuart, Steven Eichten, Jonathan Cahn, Yuliya Karpievitch, Justin Borevitz, Ryan Lister, Steven R Eichten, Justin O Borevitz & Yuliya V Karpievitch
Variation in the presence or absence of transposable elements (TEs) is a major source of genetic variation between individuals. Here, we identified 23,095 TE presence/absence variants between 216 Arabidopsis accessions. Most TE variants were rare, and we find these rare variants associated with local extremes of gene expression and DNA methylation levels within the population. Of the common alleles identified, two thirds were not in linkage disequilibrium with nearby SNPs, implicating these variants as a...

Data from: Distribution and localised effects of the invasive ascidian Didemnum perlucidum (Monniot 1983) in an urban estuary

Tiffany J. Simpson, Thomas Wernberg, Justin McDonald & Tiffany Schenk Simpson
Didemnid ascidians are notorious marine invaders, fouling infrastructure in many ecosystems globally. However, there have been few reports of direct interactions with native species in their natural environment. The invasive colonial ascidian Didemnum perlucidum was discovered in the Swan River estuary (Western Australia) growing on the native seagrass Halophila ovalis. Given the known effects of other related Didemnum species it was expected that D. perlucidum could adversely affect the seagrass, with possible flow on effects...

Data from: Translocation strategies for multiple species depend on interspecific interaction type

Michaela Plein, Michael Bode, Melinda L. Moir & Peter A. Vesk
Conservation translocations – anthropogenic movements of species to prevent their extinction – have increased substantially over the last few decades. Although multiple species are frequently moved to the same location, current translocation guidelines consider species in isolation. This practice ignores important interspecific interactions, and thereby risks translocation failure. We model three different two-species systems to illustrate the inherent complexity of multi-species translocations, and to assess the influence of different interaction types (consumer-resource, mutualism, and competition)...

Data from: Sperm use economy of honeybee (Apis mellifera) queens

Boris Baer, Jason Collins, Kristiina Maalaps & Susanne P. A. Den Boer
The queens of eusocial ants, bees, and wasps only mate during a very brief period early in life to acquire and store a lifetime supply of sperm. As sperm cannot be replenished, queens have to be highly economic when using stored sperm to fertilize eggs, especially in species with large and long-lived colonies. However, queen fertility has not been studied in detail, so that we have little understanding of how economic sperm use is in...

Data from: The carotenoid beta-carotene enhances facial color, attractiveness and perceived health, but not actual health, in humans

Yong Zhi Foo, Gillian Rhodes & Leigh W. Simmons
Carotenoid-based coloration plays an important role in mate choice in many animal species. It is argued to be an honest signal of health because carotenoids function as antioxidants and only healthy individuals can afford to use available carotenoids for signaling. Here, we tested the effect of dietary supplementation of the carotenoid beta-carotene on facial appearance and health in human males. Beta-carotene supplementation altered skin color to increase facial attractiveness and perceived health. However, we found...

Data from: Additive genetic variance in polyandry enables its evolution, but polyandry is unlikely to evolve through sexy or good sperm processes

Laura M. Travers, Leigh W. Simmons & Francisco Garcia-Gonzalez
Polyandry is widespread despite its costs. The sexually selected sperm hypotheses (‘sexy’ and ‘good’ sperm) posit that sperm competition plays a role in the evolution of polyandry. Two poorly studied assumptions of these hypotheses are the presence of additive genetic variance in polyandry and sperm competitiveness. Using a quantitative genetic breeding design in a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster, we first established the potential for polyandry to respond to selection. We then investigated whether polyandry...

Data from: Bet-hedging as a mechanism for the evolution of polyandry, revisited

Yukio Yasui & Francisco Garcia-Gonzalez
Females that mate with multiple males (polyandry) may reduce the risk that their eggs are fertilized by a single unsuitable male. About 25 years ago it was hypothesized that bet-hedging could function as a mechanism favoring the evolution of polyandry, but this idea is controversial because theory indicates that bet-hedging via polyandry can compensate the costs of mating only in small populations. Nevertheless, populations are often spatially structured, and even in the absence of spatial...

Data from: Assessing the spatial ecology and resource use of a mobile and endangered species in an urbanized landscape using satellite telemetry and DNA faecal metabarcoding

Christine Groom, Nicole E. White, Nicola Mitchell, J. Dale Roberts & Peter Mawson
The conservation of highly mobile species presents challenges to managers for assessment of threats to survival, given the difficulties in locating and observing such species. Here we evaluate satellite telemetry, DNA faecal metabarcoding and traditional field observations as three complementary techniques to acquire critical management information for an endangered species, Carnaby's Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus latirostris. Satellite telemetry of 23 birds resulted in 6026 location fixes accurate to within 500 m, and combined with extensive field observations...

Data from: Dispersal in the sub-Antarctic: king penguins show remarkably little population genetic differentiation across their range

Gemma V. Clucas, Jane L. Younger, Damian Kao, Alex D. Rogers, Jonathan Handley, Gary D. Miller, Pierre Jouventin, Paul Nolan, Karim Gharbi, Karen J. Miller & Tom Hart
Background: Seabirds are important components of marine ecosystems, both as predators and as indicators of ecological change, being conspicuous and sensitive to changes in prey abundance. To determine whether fluctuations in population sizes are localised or indicative of large-scale ecosystem change, we must first understand population structure and dispersal. King penguins are long-lived seabirds that occupy a niche across the sub-Antarctic zone close to the Polar Front. Colonies have very different histories of exploitation, population...

Data from: Concordance in evolutionary history of threatened plant and insect populations warrant unified conservation management approaches

Melinda L. Moir, David J. Coates, W. Jason Kennington, Sarah Barrett, Gary S. Taylor & W. Jason Kensington
Threatened organisms may act as host to a suite of dependent organisms, which are potentially cothreatened, yet management is rarely coordinated between host and dependent species. Here, we test the congruency of patterns of genetic structure between two critically endangered interacting taxa; the feather-leaf banksia (Banksia brownii R.Br.), and its host-specific herbivorous plant-louse Trioza barrettae Taylor & Moir, to establish whether conservation actions should be implemented jointly for both species. We also examine the role...

Data from: Direct measurement of ant predation of weed seeds in wheat cropping

Theodore A. Evans & Patrick V. Gleeson
The ecosystem service of predation of weed seeds by naturally occurring seed-eating animals, including ants, in agricultural fields has been suggested to be a potentially important biocontrol option. Laboratory and field tests have found high levels of seed removal from experimentally placed seed; however, the effect of predation on naturally dispersed weed seeds is unknown. We measured the effect of invertebrate seed predators on natural weed seed dispersal and germination in a field experiment under...

Data from: Evaluation of the first pharmacist-administered vaccinations in Western Australia: a mixed-methods study

H. Laetitia Hattingh, T. Fei Sim, R. Parsons, P. Czarniak, A. Vickery & S. Ayadurai
Objectives This study evaluated the uptake of Western Australian (WA) pharmacist vaccination services, the profiles of consumers being vaccinated and the facilitators and challenges experienced by pharmacy staff in the preparation, implementation and delivery of services. Design Mixed-methods methodology with both quantitative and qualitative data through surveys, pharmacy computer records and immuniser pharmacist interviews. Setting Community pharmacies in WA that provided pharmacist vaccination services between March and October 2015. Participants Immuniser pharmacists from 86 pharmacies...

Data from: Temporal patterns in the abundance of a critically endangered marsupial relates to disturbance by roads and agriculture

Georgina J. Yeatman, Adrian F. Wayne, Harriet R. Mills & Jane Prince
The aim of this study was to investigate how landscape disturbance associated with roads, agriculture and forestry influenced temporal patterns in woylie (Bettongia penicillata) abundance before, during and after periods of rapid population change. Data were collected from an area of approximately 140,000 ha of forest within the Upper Warren region in south-western Australia. Woylie abundance was measured using cage trapping at 22 grid and five transect locations with varying degrees of landscape disturbance between...

Data from: Mutualists or parasites? Context-dependent influence of symbiotic fly larvae on carnivorous investment in the Albany pitcher plant

Samuel J. Lymbery, Raphael K. Didham, Stephen D. Hopper & Leigh W. Simmons
Carnivorous plants allocate more resources to carnivorous structures under nutrient-limited conditions, and relative investment can also be influenced by animals (infauna) that live in association with these plants and feed on their prey. We investigated these effects within a population of the pitcher plant Cephalotus follicularis containing varying densities of larvae of the fly Badisis ambulans. For plants with a relatively high proportion of adult pitchers, increasing larval density was associated with lower relative leaf...

Data from: Caregivers' attitude towards people with mental illness and perceived stigma: a cross-sectional study in a tertiary hospital in Nepal

Dipika Neupane, Sarmila Dhakal, Sabita Thapa, Parash Mani Bhandari & Shiva Raj Mishra
Background: Mental illness is stigmatized in most of the communities and people with such illness are often subjected to defame. Stigma impairs an individual’s and their caregiver’s physical, social and emotional wellbeing, and health-seeking behavior. Sufficient literature on how often the caregivers of people with mental illness from low and middle-income countries are stigmatized and how they perceive people with mental illness is unavailable. In this study, we examined caregivers’ attitude towards people with mental...

Data from: Conflict between background matching and social signalling in a colour-changing freshwater fish

Jennifer L. Kelley, Gwendolen M. Rodgers & Lesley J. Morrell
The ability to change coloration allows animals to modify their patterning to suit a specific function. Many freshwater fishes, for example, can appear cryptic by altering the dispersion of melanin pigment in the skin to match the visual background. However, melanin-based pigments are also used to signal dominance among competing males; thus colour change for background matching may conflict with colour change for social status signalling. We used a colour-changing freshwater fish to investigate whether...

Data from: Increasing the germination envelope under water stress improves seedling emergence in two dominant grass species across different pulse rainfall events

Wolfgang Lewandrowski, Todd E. Erickson, Kingsley W. Dixon & Jason C. Stevens
1. Demographic recruitment processes, such as seed germination and seedling emergence, are critical transitional phases to the re-establishment of degraded plant populations, but often fail due to rainfall not supporting plant requirements. Using species from the widespread arid Australian perennial grass genus Triodia, we investigated the interactions of seeds in different dormancy states and their functional germination envelope in response to water stress after simulated pulse rainfall events. 2. Seed dormancy was alleviated in Triodia...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    33

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    33

Affiliations

  • University of Western Australia
    33
  • Curtin University
    5
  • Murdoch University
    3
  • Spanish National Research Council
    3
  • Department of Parks and Wildlife
    3
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • University of Montreal
    2
  • University of Melbourne
    2
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1