48 Works

Data from: Species richness effects on grassland recovery from drought depend on community productivity in a multisite experiment

Juergen Kreyling, Jürgen Dengler, Julia Walter, Nikolay Velev, Emin Ugurlu, Desislava Sopotlieva, Johannes Ransijn, Catherine Picon-Cochard, Ivan Nijs, Pauline Hernandez, Behlül Güler, Philipp Von Gillhaussen, Hans J. De Boeck, Juliette M. G. Bloor, Sigi Berwaers, Carl Beierkuhnlein, Mohammed A. S. Arfin Khan, Iva Apostolova, Yasin Altan, Michaela Zeiter, Camilla Wellstein, Marcelo Sternberg, Andreas Stampfli, Giandiego Campetella, Sándor Bartha … & Juliette M.G. Bloor
Biodiversity can buffer ecosystem functioning against extreme climatic events, but few experiments have explicitly tested this. Here, we present the first multisite biodiversity × drought manipulation experiment to examine drought resistance and recovery at five temperate and Mediterranean grassland sites. Aboveground biomass production declined by 30% due to experimental drought (standardised local extremity by rainfall exclusion for 72–98 consecutive days). Species richness did not affect resistance but promoted recovery. Recovery was only positively affected by...

Data from: Managing seagrass resilience under cumulative dredging affecting light: predicting risk using dynamic Bayesian networks

Paul Pao-Yen Wu, Kathryn McMahon, Michael A. Rasheed, Gary A. Kendrick, Paul H. York, Kathryn Chartrand, M. Julian Caley & Kerrie Mengersen
Coastal development is contributing to ongoing declines of ecosystems globally. Consequently, understanding the risks posed to these systems, and how they respond to successive disturbances, is paramount for their improved management. We study the cumulative impacts of maintenance dredging on seagrass ecosystems as a canonical example. Maintenance dredging causes disturbances lasting weeks to months, often repeated at yearly intervals. We present a risk-based modelling framework for time varying complex systems centred around a dynamic Bayesian...

Data from: Socially cued seminal fluid gene expression mediates responses in ejaculate quality to sperm competition risk

Leigh W. Simmons & Maxine Lovegrove
There is considerable evidence that males will increase the number of sperm ejaculated in response to sperm competition risk. However, whether they have the capacity to adjust seminal fluid components of the ejaculate has received less attention. Male crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus) have been shown to adjust the viability of sperm in their ejaculate in response to sperm competition risk. Here we show that socially mediated plasticity in sperm viability is probably due, at least in...

Data from: Hierarchical multi-taxa models inform riparian vs. hydrologic restoration of urban streams in a permeable landscape

Daniel C. Gwinn, Jennifer A. Middleton, Leah Beesley, Paul Close, Belinda Quinton, Tim Storer, Peter M. Davies & Jen A. Middleton
The degradation of streams caused by urbanization tends to follow predictable patterns; however, there is a growing appreciation for heterogeneity in stream response to urbanization due to the local geoclimatic context. Furthermore, there is building evidence that streams in mildly sloped, permeable landscapes respond uncharacteristically to urban stress calling for a more nuanced approach to restoration. We evaluated the relative influence of local-scale riparian characteristics and catchment-scale imperviousness on the macroinvertebrate assemblages of streams in...

The Doctrine of Hot Pursuit under International Law

Caroline Coombs

Data from: High fidelity: extra-pair fertilisations in eight Charadrius plover species are not associated with parental relatedness or social mating system

Kathryn H. Maher, Luke J. Eberhart-Phillips, András Kosztolányi, Natalie Dos Remedios, María Cristina Carmona-Isunza, Medardo Cruz-López, Sama Zefania, James J. H. St Clair, Monif AlRashidi, Michael A. Weston, Martín A. Serrano-Meneses, Oliver Krüger, Joseph I. Hoffmann, Tamás Székely, Terry Burke, Clemens Küpper & Joseph I. Hoffman
Extra-pair paternity is a common reproductive strategy in many bird species. However, it remains unclear why extra-pair paternity occurs and why it varies among species and populations. Plovers (Charadrius spp.) exhibit considerable variation in reproductive behaviour and ecology, making them excellent models to investigate the evolution of social and genetic mating systems. We investigated inter- and intra-specific patterns of extra-pair parentage and evaluated three major hypotheses explaining extra-pair paternity using a comparative approach based on...

Data from: Logging, exotic plant invasions, and native plant reassembly in a lowland tropical rain forest

Timm F. Döbert, Bruce L. Webber, John B. Sugau, Katharine J. M. Dickinson & Raphael K. Didham
Habitat modification and biological invasions are key drivers of global environmental change. However, the extent and impact of exotic plant invasions in modified tropical landscapes remains poorly understood. We examined whether logging drives exotic plant invasions, and whether their combined influences alter understory plant community composition in lowland rain forests in Borneo. We tested the relationship between understory communities and local- and landscape-scale logging intensity, using leaf area index (LAI) and above-ground biomass (AGB) data...

Data from: Population demography and heterozygosity-fitness correlations in natural guppy populations: an examination using sexually selected fitness traits

Catherine E. Grueber, John L. Fitzpatrick, Alessandro Devigili, Clelia Gasparini, Indar W. Ramnarine & Jonathan P. Evans
Heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs) have been examined in a wide diversity of contexts, and the results are often used to infer the role of inbreeding in natural populations. Although population demography, reflected in population-level genetic parameters such as allelic diversity or identity disequilibrium, is expected to play a role in the emergence and detectability of HFCs, direct comparisons of variation in HFCs across many populations of the same species, with different genetic histories, are rare. Here,...

Data from: Seascape genomics reveals fine-scale patterns of dispersal for a reef fish along the ecologically divergent coast of Northwestern Australia

Joseph D. DiBattista, Michael J. Travers, Glenn I. Moore, Richard D. Evans, Stephen J. Newman, Ming Feng, Samuel D. Moyle, Rebecca J. Gorton, Thor Saunders & Oliver Berry
Understanding the drivers of dispersal among populations is a central topic in marine ecology and fundamental for spatially explicit management of marine resources. The extensive coast of Northwestern Australia provides an emerging frontier for implementing new genomic tools to comparatively identify patterns of dispersal across diverse and extreme environmental conditions. Here, we focused on the stripey snapper (Lutjanus carponotatus), which is important to recreational, charter-based and customary fishers throughout the Indo-West Pacific. We collected 1,016...

Data from: Nutritional geometry of paternal effects on embryo mortality

Michal Polak, Leigh W. SImmons, Joshua B. Benoit, Kari Ruohonen, Stephen J. Simpson & Samantha M. Solon-Biet
Well-established causal links exist between maternal nutritional deficits and embryo health and viability. By contrast, environmental effects operating through the father that could influence embryo mortality have seldom been examined. Yet, ejaculates can require non-trivial resource allocation, and seminal plasma components are increasingly recognized to exert wide-ranging effects on females and offspring, so paternal dietary effects on the embryo should be expected. We test for effects of varying levels of protein (P), carbohydrate (C) and...

Data from: Plant-soil feedback and the maintenance of diversity in Mediterranean-climate shrublands

Francois P. Teste, Paul Kardol, Benjamin L. Turner, David A. Wardle, Graham Zemunik, Michael Renton & Etienne Laliberté
Soil biota influence plant performance through plant-soil feedback, but it is unclear whether the strength of such feedback depends on plant traits and whether plant-soil feedback drives local plant diversity. We grew 16 co-occurring plant species with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies from hyperdiverse Australian shrublands and exposed them to soil biota from under their own or other plant species. Plant responses to soil biota varied according to their nutrient-acquisition strategy, including positive feedback for ectomycorrhizal plants...

Data from: Effects of small-scale, shading-induced seagrass loss on blue carbon storage: Implications for management of degraded seagrass ecosystems

Stacey M. Trevathan-Tackett, Caitlin Wessel, Just Cebrian, Peter J. Ralph, Pere Masque & Peter I. Macreadie
1. Seagrass meadows are important global ‘blue carbon’ sinks. Despite a 30% loss of seagrasses globally during the last century, there is limited empirical research investigating the effects of disturbance and loss of seagrass on blue carbon stocks. 2. In this study, we hypothesised that seagrass loss would reduce blue carbon stocks. Using shading cloth, we simulated small-scale die-offs of two subtropical seagrass species, Halodule wrightii and Thalassia testudinum, in a dynamic northern Gulf of...

Data from: Temperature-regulated guest admission and release in microporous materials

Gang Kevin Li, Jin Shang, Qinfen Gu, Rohan V. Awati, Nathan Jensen, Andrew Grant, Xueying Zhang, David S. Sholl, Jefferson Z. Liu, Paul A. Webley & Eric F. May
While it has long been known that some highly adsorbing microporous materials suddenly become inaccessible to guest molecules below certain temperatures, previous attempts to explain this phenomenon have failed. Here we show that this anomalous sorption behaviour is a temperature-regulated guest admission process, where the pore-keeping group’s thermal fluctuations are influenced by interactions with guest molecules. A physical model is presented to explain the atomic-level chemistry and structure of these thermally regulated micropores, which is...

Data from: Sperm as arbiters of environmentally induced paternal effects in a livebearing fish

Jonathan Evans, Rowan Lymbery, Kyle Wiid, Moshiur Rahman, Clelia Gasparini, Jonathan P. Evans, Rowan A. Lymbery, Kyle S. Wiid &
Until recently, paternal effects – the influence of fathers on their offspring due to environmental factors rather than genes – were largely discarded or assumed to be confined to species exhibiting paternal care. It is now recognised that paternal effects can be transmitted through the ejaculate, but unambiguous evidence for them is scarce because it is difficult to isolate effects operating via changes to the ejaculate from maternal effects driven by female mate assessment. Here...

Data from: The challenges of detecting subtle population structure and its importance for the conservation of emperor penguins

Jane L. Younger, Gemma V. Clucas, Damian Kao, Alex D. Rogers, Karim Gharbi, Tom Hart & Karen J. Miller
Understanding the boundaries of breeding populations is of great importance for conservation efforts and estimates of extinction risk for threatened species. However, determining these boundaries can be difficult when population structure is subtle. Emperor penguins are highly reliant on sea ice, and some populations may be in jeopardy as climate change alters sea-ice extent and quality. An understanding of emperor penguin population structure is therefore urgently needed. Two previous studies have differed in their conclusions,...

Data from: Loggerhead sea turtle embryos (Caretta caretta) regulate expression of stress-response and developmental genes when exposed to a biologically realistic heat stress

Blair P. Bentley, Brian J. Haas, Jamie N. Tedeschi & Oliver Berry
Oviparous reptile embryos are expected to breach their critical thermal maxima if temperatures reach those predicted under current climate change models due to the lack the maternal buffering processes and parental care. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are integral in the molecular response to thermal stress, and their expression is heritable, but the roles of other candidate families such as the heat shock factors (HSFs) have not been determined in reptiles. Here we subject embryonic sea...

Data from: Reef accessibility impairs the protection of sharks

Jean-Baptiste Juhel, Laurent Vigliola, David Mouillot, Michel Kulbicki, Tom B. Letessier, Jessica J. Meeuwig & Laurent Wantiez
1. Reef sharks are declining worldwide under ever increasing fishing pressure with potential consequences on ecosystem functioning. Marine protected areas (MPAs) are currently one of the management tools to counteract the pervasive impacts of fishing. However, MPAs in which reef sharks are abundant tend to be located in remote and underexploited areas preventing a fair assessment of management effectiveness beyond remoteness from human activities. 2. Here we determine the conditions under which MPAs can effectively...

Data from: Neutralizing misinformation through inoculation: exposing misleading argumentation techniques reduces their influence

John Cook, Ullrich Ecker, Ullrich K.H. Lewandowsky, Stephan Lewandowsky & Ullrich K. H. Ecker
Misinformation can undermine a well-functioning democracy. For example, public misconceptions about climate change can lead to lowered acceptance of the reality of climate change and lowered support for mitigation policies. This study experimentally explored the impact of misinformation about climate change and tested several pre-emptive interventions designed to reduce the influence of misinformation. We found that false-balance media coverage (giving contrarian views equal voice with climate scientists) lowered perceived consensus overall, although the effect was...

Data from: Cognitive performance is linked to group size and affects fitness in Australian magpies

Benjamin J Ashton, Amanda R Ridley, Emily K Edwards & Alex Thornton
The Social Intelligence Hypothesis argues that the demands of social life drive cognitive evolution. This idea receives support from comparative studies linking variation in group size or mating systems with cognitive and neuroanatomical differences across species, but findings are contradictory and contentious. To understand the cognitive consequences of sociality it is also important to investigate social variation within species. Here we show that in wild, cooperatively breeding Australian magpies, individuals living in larger groups show...

Data from: Estimating the prevalence of food risk increasing behaviours in UK kitchens

Anna K. Jones, Paul Cross, Michael Burton, Caroline Millman, Sarah J. O'Brien, Dan Rigby & Sarah J. O’Brien
Foodborne disease poses a serious threat to public health. In the UK, half a million cases are linked to known pathogens and more than half of all outbreaks are associated with catering establishments. The UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) has initiated the UK Food Hygiene Rating Scheme in which commercial food establishments are inspected and scored with the results made public. In this study we investigate the prevalence of food risk increasing behaviours among chefs,...

Data from: Egg chemoattractants moderate intraspecific sperm competition

Rowan A. Lymbery, W. Jason Kennington & Jonathan P. Evans
Interactions among eggs and sperm are often assumed to generate intraspecific variation in reproductive fitness, but the specific gamete-level mechanisms underlying competitive fertilization success remain elusive in most species. Sperm chemotaxis–the attraction of sperm by egg-derived chemicals—is a ubiquitous form of gamete signaling, occurring throughout the animal and plant kingdoms. The chemical cues released by eggs are known to act at the interspecific level (e.g., facilitating species recognition), but recent studies have suggested that they...

Data from: Across the Indian Ocean: a remarkable example of trans-oceanic dispersal in an austral mygalomorph spider

Sophie E. Harrison, Mark S. Harvey, Steven J.B. Cooper, Andrew D. Austin, Michael G. Rix & Steve J. B. Cooper
The Migidae are a family of austral trapdoor spiders known to show a highly restricted and disjunct distribution pattern. Here, we aim to investigate the phylogeny and historical biogeography of the group, which was previously thought to be vicariant in origin, and examine the biogeographic origins of the genus Moggridgea using a dated multi-gene phylogeny. Moggridgea specimens were sampled from southern Australia and Africa, and Bertmainus was sampled from Western Australia. Sanger sequencing methods were...

Data from: Habitat filtering determines the functional niche occupancy of plant communities worldwide

Yuanzhi Li, Bill Shipley, Jodi N. Price, Vinícius De L. Dantas, Riin Tamme, Mark Westoby, Andrew Siefert, Brandon S. Schamp, Marko J. Spasojevic, Vincent Jung, Daniel C. Laughlin, Sarah J. Richardson, Yoann Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Christian Schöb, Antonio Gazol, Honor C. Prentice, Nicolas Gross, Jacob Overton, Marcus V. Cianciaruso, Frédérique Louault, Chiho Kamiyama, Tohru Nakashizuka, Kouki Hikosaka, Takehiro Sasaki, Masatoshi Katabuchi … & Marco A. Batalha
How the patterns of niche occupancy vary from species-poor to species-rich communities is a fundamental question in ecology that has a central bearing on the processes that drive patterns of biodiversity. As species richness increases, habitat filtering should constrain the expansion of total niche volume, while limiting similarity should restrict the degree of niche overlap between species. Here, by explicitly incorporating intraspecific trait variability, we investigate the relationship between functional niche occupancy and species richness...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    48

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    47
  • Other
    1

Affiliations

  • University of Western Australia
    48
  • University of Otago
    4
  • Curtin University
    4
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    3
  • James Cook University
    3
  • University of Liverpool
    3
  • University of Padua
    2
  • University of the West Indies
    2
  • University of Eastern Finland
    2
  • University of Montreal
    2