44 Works

Termite abundance and ecosystem processes in Maliau Basin, 2015-2016

L.A. Ashton, H.M. Griffiths, C.L. Parr, T.A. Evans & P. Eggleton
This dataset consists of invertebrate abundance data and associated ecosystem measurements (Including leaf litter depth and mass, seedlings, soil moisture and nutrients, and rainfall) measured within an area of lowland, old growth dipterocarp rainforest in the Maliau Basin Conservation Area, Sabah, Malaysia between 2015 and 2016. Data were collected during a collaborative project which was included in the NERC Human-modified tropical forest (HMTF) programme.

Data from: Phylogenetic systematics of subtribe Spiranthinae (Orchidaceae: Orchidoideae: Cranichideae) based on nuclear and plastid DNA sequences of a nearly complete generic sample

Gerardo A. Salazar, Joao A.N. Batista, Lidia I. Cabrera, Cassio Van Den Berg, W. Mark Whitten, Eric C. Smidt, Cristiano R. Buzatto, Rodrigo B. Singer, Gunter Gerlach, Rolando Jimenez-Machorro, Jose A. Radins, Irma S. Insaurralde, Leonardo R.S. Guimaraes, Fabio De Barros, Francisco Tobar, Jose L. Linares, Ernesto Mujica, Robert L. Dressler, Mario A. Blanco, Eric Hagsater & Mark W. Chase
Subtribe Spiranthinae is the most species-rich lineage of terrestrial Neotropical orchids, encompassing > 500 species and 40 genera. We conducted maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence data of plastid matK-trnK and trnL-trnF and nuclear ribosomal ITS sequences for 36 genera and 182 species of Spiranthinae plus appropriate outgroups. The results strongly support monophyly of Spiranthinae (minus Discyphus, Discyphinae and Galeottiella, Galeottiellinae) and five major lineages, namely monospecific Cotylolabium (sister to the...

Data from: Limited influence of landscape on the genetic structure of three small mammals in a heterogeneous arid environment

Esther Levy, Margaret Byrne, Joel A. Huey, Mia J. Hillyer, Renee C. Firman & Kym M. Ottewell
Aim: The complexity and biologically challenging nature of arid landscapes can generate high inter- and intra-species diversity, although these biomes remain poorly studied. We investigated whether prominent geomorphic features in an Australian arid landscape had similar influences on patterns of intra-specific genetic diversity of three small mammals with different distribution and life history traits. Specifically, we tested (1) whether mountain ranges harbour high diversity and act as refugia, (2) the extent to which ephemeral river...

Data from: Seeds in motion: genetic assignment and hydrodynamic models demonstrate concordant patterns of seagrass dispersal

Elizabeth A. Sinclair, Leonardo Ruiz-Montoya, Siegfried L. Krauss, Janet M. Anthony, Renae K. Hovey, Ryan J. Lowe & Gary A. Kendrick
Movement is fundamental to the ecology and evolutionary dynamics within species. Understanding movement through seed dispersal in the marine environment can be difficult due to the high spatial and temporal variability of ocean currents. We employed a mutually enriching approach of population genetic assignment procedures and dispersal predictions from a hydrodynamic model to overcome this difficulty and quantify the movement of dispersing floating fruit of the temperate seagrass Posidonia australis Hook.f. across coastal waters in...

Data from: High levels of polyandry, but limited evidence for multiple paternity, in wild populations of the western rock lobster (Panulirus cygnus)

Jacqueline Loo, Winn Jason Kennington, Simon De Lestang, Jason How & Jonathan P. Evans
Polyandry, where multiple mating by females results in the temporal and spatial overlap of ejaculates from two or more males, is taxonomically widespread and occurs in varying frequencies within and among species. In decapods (crabs, lobsters, crayfish and prawns), rates of polyandry are likely to be variable, but the extent to which patterns of multiple paternity reflect multiple mating, and thus are shaped by post-mating processes that bias fertilization towards one or a subset of...

Data from: Soil types select for plants with matching nutrient‐acquisition and ‐use traits in hyperdiverse and severely nutrient‐impoverished campos rupestres and cerrado in Central Brazil

Anna Abrahão, Patrícia Costa, Hans Lambers, Sara Adrián L. De Andrade, Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland Sawaya, Megan H. Ryan & Rafael SIlva Oliveira
1. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie the generation of beta-diversity remains a challenge in ecology. Underground plant adaptations to environmental gradients have received relatively little attention. 2. We studied plant nutrient-acquisition strategies and nutrient-use efficiency at three stages of pedogenesis in infertile soils from campos rupestres and on less infertile soil from cerrado sensu stricto in Brazil. All soils support very high plant diversity with high species turnover between soil types at small spatial scales...

Data from: Scary clowns: adaptive function of anemonefish coloration

Sami Merilaita & Jennifer L. Kelley
Clownfishes, with their showy colouration, are well known for their symbiosis with sea anemones and for their hierarchical reproductive system, but the function of their colouration is unclear. We used a phylogeny of 27 clownfish species to test whether fish colouration: (1) serves a protective function that involves their anemone hosts, or (2) signals species identity in species with overlapping host ranges that can potentially share the same host. We tested for an association between...

Data from: Genetic diversity and drivers of dwarfism in extinct island emu populations

Vicki A. Thomson, Kieren J. Mitchell, Rolan Eberhard, Joe Dortch, Jeremy J. Austin & Alan Cooper
Australia’s iconic emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae novaehollandiae) is the only living representative of its genus, but fossil evidence and reports from early European explorers suggest that three island forms (at least two of which were dwarfs) became extinct during the 19th century. While one of these - the King Island emu - has been found to be conspecific with Australian mainland emus, little is known about how the other two forms - Kangaroo Island and Tasmanian...

Data from: Macronutrients and micronutrients drive trade-offs between male pre- and post-mating sexual traits

Soon Hwee Ng, Stephen J. Simpson & Leigh W. Simmons
Nutrition fundamentally affects growth and reproduction, and identifying how nutrient intakes are linked to the expression of these life-history traits can advance understanding of the mechanisms underlying life history trade-offs. Males are thought to face trade-offs between the allocation of resources to pre-mating secondary sexual traits for gaining access to females and allocation to post-mating traits such as ejaculate quality that affects their fertility. We used the Geometric Framework for nutrition to examine the effects...

Data from: Effectiveness of camera traps for quantifying daytime and nighttime visitation by vertebrate pollinators

Siegfried L. Krauss, David G. Roberts, Ryan D. Phillips & Caroline Edwards
1. Identification of pollen vectors is a fundamental objective of pollination biology. The foraging and social behavior of these pollinators has profound effects on plant mating, making quantification of their behaviour critical for understanding the ecological and evolutionary consequences of different pollinators for the plants they visit. However, accurate quantification of visitation may be problematic, especially for shy animals and/or when the temporal and spatial scale of observation desired is large. Sophisticated heat- and movement-triggered...

Data from: Going to extremes for sodium acquisition: use of community land and high-altitude areas by mountain gorillas Gorilla beringei in Rwanda

Cyril C. Grueter, Edward Wright, Didier Abavandimwe, Sylvia Ortmann, Antoine Mudakikwa, Abel Musana, Propser Uwingeli, Felix Ndagijimana, Veronica Vecellio, Tara S. Stoinski & Martha M. Robbins
Space use in mammals may be influenced not only by their primary foods, but also by localized sources of physiologically critical resources such as sodium-rich plants. We examined how sodium acquisition influences habitat use in mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei) in Rwanda which have increased the amount of time they forage on community land outside of Volcanoes National Park (VNP), where eucalyptus (Eucalyptus spp.) tree bark is their most frequently eaten food. We measured sodium content...

Data from: Positive size-speed relationships in gametes and vegetative cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii; implications for the evolution of sperm.

Catherine Ellen Seed & Joseph L. Tomkins
It is commonly held that differences in gametes of the two sexes (anisogamy) evolved from ancestors whose gametes were similar in size and behaviour (isogamy). Underlying many hypotheses explaining anisogamy are assumed relationships between cell size and speed in the ancestral isogamous population. Using the isogamous alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we explored size-speed distributions in vegetative and gamete cells of ten cell lines, and clonal data from within two cell lines. We applied an independent speed...

Data from: Habitat discontinuities form strong barriers to gene flow among mangrove populations, despite the capacity for long distance dispersal

Rachel M. Binks, Margaret Byrne, Kathryn McMahon, Georgina Pitt, Kathy Murray & Richard D. Evans
Aim Mangrove forests are among the world’s most important ecosystems but are declining rapidly worldwide. Effective conservation management requires a better understanding of the patterns and drivers of gene flow across a range of spatial scales. Despite the capacity for long distance propagule dispersal, field studies suggest that mangrove propagules tend not to disperse far from the release point, which has important implications for the impact of habitat discontinuities on gene flow. We use a...

Data from: The benefits of pair bond tenure in the cooperatively breeding pied babbler (Turdoides bicolor)

Elizabeth M. Wiley & Amanda R. Ridley
The benefits of stable pair bonds (that persist between breeding attempts) have been well described, but are relatively less well known in cooperatively breeding species. If pair bonds are beneficial, then it is possible that the bond between the behaviorally and socially dominant pair may influence factors such as reproductive success and group stability in cooperative species. Here we used long-term data to investigate the relationships between pair bond tenure, reproductive success and group stability...

Data from: Internal acoustic structuring in pied babbler recruitment cries specifies the form of recruitment

Sabrina Engesser, Amanda R Ridley, Marta B Manser, Andri Manser & Simon W Townsend
Language is inherently combinatorial, and parallels of this combinatorial capacity are found in nonhuman systems, with animals combining sounds and calls into larger meaningful structures. However, further analogue examples are central in unveiling the diversity, distribution, and evolutionary drivers of combinatoriality. Here, we provide evidence for internal “meaning-refining” acoustic variation within a larger stereotyped signal in pied babblers (Turdoides bicolor). Using acoustic analyses, we demonstrate that males produce 2 long, raucous, “cry-like” structures, both starting...

Data from: A seascape genetic analysis of a stress-tolerant coral species along the Western Australian coast

Richard D. Evans, Nicole M. Ryan, Michael J. Travers, Ming Feng, Yvette Hitchen & W. Jason Kennington
Genetic diversity and connectivity are key factors in determining a population’s resilience to future disturbance. This is especially relevant to corals, which are in global decline due to increasing frequency and strength of thermal anomalies and severe tropical cyclones. While many studies have investigated genetic diversity and population structure in corals, they focused on species being removed at the greatest rate from coral reefs, Acroporids and Pocilloporids, and it is unclear whether the patterns observed...

Data from: Experimental habitat fragmentation disrupts nematode infections in Australian skinks

Julian Resasco, Matthew E. Bitters, Saul A. Cunningham, Hugh I. Jones, Valerie J. McKenzie & Kendi F. Davies
Habitat conversion and fragmentation threaten biodiversity and disrupt species interactions. While parasites are recognized as ecologically important, the impacts of fragmentation on parasitism are poorly understood relative to other species interactions. This lack of understanding is in part due to confounding landscape factors that accompany fragmentation. Fragmentation experiments provide the opportunity to fill this knowledge gap by mechanistically testing how fragmentation affects parasitism while controlling landscape factors. In a large-scale, long-term experiment, we asked how...

Data from: Social manipulation of sperm competition intensity reduces seminal fluid gene expression

Nadia S. Sloan, Maxine Lovegrove & Leigh W. Simmons
A considerable body of evidence supports the prediction that males should increase their expenditure on the ejaculate in response to sperm competition risk. The prediction that they should reduce their expenditure with increasing sperm competition intensity is less well supported. Moreover, most studies have documented plasticity in sperm numbers. Here we show that male crickets Teleogryllus oceanicus exhibit reduced seminal fluid gene expression and accessory gland mass in response to elevated sperm competition intensity. Together...

Data from: Extreme fertilisation bias towards freshly inseminated sperm in a species exhibiting prolonged female sperm storage

Clelia Gasparini, Emma Daymond & Jonathan P. Evans
The storage of sperm by females across successive reproductive cycles is well documented in internal fertilisers, yet the fate of stored sperm when they compete with ‘new’ sperm to fertilise a female’s eggs has rarely been considered. This gap in our understanding is likely due to the logistical difficulties of controlling behavioural interactions during or after mating, which in turn may influence how many sperm are inseminated and how stored sperm are ultimately utilised during...

Data from: Evolutionary divergence in competitive mating success through female mating bias for good genes

Robert J. Dugand, W. Jason Kennington & Joseph L. Tomkins
Despite heritable variation for univariate sexually selected traits, recent analyses exploring multivariate traits find evidence consistent with the lek paradox in showing no genetic variation available to choosy females, and therefore no genetic benefits of choice. We used the preferences of Drosophila melanogaster females to exert bidirectional selection on competitive male mating success to test for the presence and nature of genetic variation underlying this multivariate trait. Male mating success diverged between selection regimens, and...

Data from: Comparative population genomics reveals key barriers to dispersal in Southern Ocean penguins

Gemma V. Clucas, Jane L. Younger, Damian Kao, Louise Emmerson, Colin Southwell, Barbara Wienecke, Alex D. Rogers, Charles-Andre Bost, Gary D. Miller, Michael J. Polito, Patrick Lelliot, Jonathan Handley, Sarah Crofts, Richard A. Phillips, Michael J. Dunn, Karen J. Miller, Tom Hart & Patrick Lelliott
The mechanisms that determine patterns of species dispersal are important factors in the production and maintenance of biodiversity. Understanding these mechanisms helps to forecast the responses of species to environmental change. Here we used a comparative framework and genome-wide data obtained through RAD-seq to compare the patterns of connectivity among breeding colonies for five penguin species with shared ancestry, overlapping distributions, and differing ecological niches, allowing an examination of the intrinsic and extrinsic barriers governing...

Data from: A novel approach to determining dynamic nitrogen thresholds for seagrass conservation

Milena B. Fernandes, Jos Van Gils, Paul L. A. Erftemeijer, Rob Daly, Dennis Gonzalez & Karen Rouse
1. Seagrass decline is often related to eutrophication, with sudden and drastic losses attributed to tipping points in nutrient loads. The identification of these threshold loads is an important step in the sustainable management of nutrient discharges. 2. In this study, a novel methodological approach is presented to simulate the spatial and temporal dynamics of coastal nitrogen loads, and its relationship to seagrass loss. The analysis allows the identification of nitrogen thresholds associated with the...

Data from: Phenotypic plasticity in genitalia: baculum shape responds to sperm competition risk in house mice

Gonçalo Igreja André, Renee C. Firman & Leigh W. Simmons
Males are known to adjust their expenditure on testes growth and sperm production in response to sperm competition risk. Genital morphology can also contribute to competitive fertilisation success but whether male genital morphology can respond plastically to the sperm competition environment has received little attention. Here, we exposed male house mice to two different sperm competition environments during their sexual development and quantified phenotypic plasticity in baculum morphology. The sperm competition environment generated plasticity in...

Data from: Impact of ecological redundancy on the performance of machine learning classifiers in vegetation mapping

Paul D. Macintyre, Adriaan Van Niekerk, Mark P. Dobrowolski, James L. Tsakalos & Ladislav Mucina
Vegetation maps are models of the real vegetation patterns and are considered important tools in conservation and management planning. Maps created through traditional methods can be expensive and time‐consuming, thus, new more efficient approaches are needed. The prediction of vegetation patterns using machine learning shows promise, but many factors may impact on its performance. One important factor is the nature of the vegetation–environment relationship assessed and ecological redundancy. We used two datasets with known ecological...

Data from: Population density mediates the interaction between pre- and post-mating sexual selection

Erin L. McCullough, Bruno A. Buzatto & Leigh W. Simmons
When females mate with more than one male, sexual selection acts both before and after mating. The interaction between pre- and post-mating episodes of selection is expected to be context dependent, but few studies have investigated how total sexual selection changes under different ecological conditions. We examined how population density mediates the interaction between pre- and post-mating sexual selection by establishing replicate populations of the horned dung beetle Onthophagus taurus at low, medium, and high...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    44

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    44

Affiliations

  • University of Western Australia
    44
  • Australian National University
    3
  • University of Cape Town
    3
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    3
  • Department of Parks and Wildlife
    3
  • Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment
    2
  • Murdoch University
    2
  • Royal Botanic Gardens
    2
  • Macquarie University
    2
  • Curtin University
    2