44 Works

Data from: Scary clowns: adaptive function of anemonefish coloration

Sami Merilaita & Jennifer L. Kelley
Clownfishes, with their showy colouration, are well known for their symbiosis with sea anemones and for their hierarchical reproductive system, but the function of their colouration is unclear. We used a phylogeny of 27 clownfish species to test whether fish colouration: (1) serves a protective function that involves their anemone hosts, or (2) signals species identity in species with overlapping host ranges that can potentially share the same host. We tested for an association between...

Termite abundance and ecosystem processes in Maliau Basin, 2015-2016

L.A. Ashton, H.M. Griffiths, C.L. Parr, T.A. Evans & P. Eggleton
This dataset consists of invertebrate abundance data and associated ecosystem measurements (Including leaf litter depth and mass, seedlings, soil moisture and nutrients, and rainfall) measured within an area of lowland, old growth dipterocarp rainforest in the Maliau Basin Conservation Area, Sabah, Malaysia between 2015 and 2016. Data were collected during a collaborative project which was included in the NERC Human-modified tropical forest (HMTF) programme.

Data from: High levels of polyandry, but limited evidence for multiple paternity, in wild populations of the western rock lobster (Panulirus cygnus)

Jacqueline Loo, Winn Jason Kennington, Simon De Lestang, Jason How & Jonathan P. Evans
Polyandry, where multiple mating by females results in the temporal and spatial overlap of ejaculates from two or more males, is taxonomically widespread and occurs in varying frequencies within and among species. In decapods (crabs, lobsters, crayfish and prawns), rates of polyandry are likely to be variable, but the extent to which patterns of multiple paternity reflect multiple mating, and thus are shaped by post-mating processes that bias fertilization towards one or a subset of...

Data from: Phylogenetic systematics of subtribe Spiranthinae (Orchidaceae: Orchidoideae: Cranichideae) based on nuclear and plastid DNA sequences of a nearly complete generic sample

Gerardo A. Salazar, Joao A.N. Batista, Lidia I. Cabrera, Cassio Van Den Berg, W. Mark Whitten, Eric C. Smidt, Cristiano R. Buzatto, Rodrigo B. Singer, Gunter Gerlach, Rolando Jimenez-Machorro, Jose A. Radins, Irma S. Insaurralde, Leonardo R.S. Guimaraes, Fabio De Barros, Francisco Tobar, Jose L. Linares, Ernesto Mujica, Robert L. Dressler, Mario A. Blanco, Eric Hagsater & Mark W. Chase
Subtribe Spiranthinae is the most species-rich lineage of terrestrial Neotropical orchids, encompassing > 500 species and 40 genera. We conducted maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence data of plastid matK-trnK and trnL-trnF and nuclear ribosomal ITS sequences for 36 genera and 182 species of Spiranthinae plus appropriate outgroups. The results strongly support monophyly of Spiranthinae (minus Discyphus, Discyphinae and Galeottiella, Galeottiellinae) and five major lineages, namely monospecific Cotylolabium (sister to the...

Data from: Limited influence of landscape on the genetic structure of three small mammals in a heterogeneous arid environment

Esther Levy, Margaret Byrne, Joel A. Huey, Mia J. Hillyer, Renee C. Firman & Kym M. Ottewell
Aim: The complexity and biologically challenging nature of arid landscapes can generate high inter- and intra-species diversity, although these biomes remain poorly studied. We investigated whether prominent geomorphic features in an Australian arid landscape had similar influences on patterns of intra-specific genetic diversity of three small mammals with different distribution and life history traits. Specifically, we tested (1) whether mountain ranges harbour high diversity and act as refugia, (2) the extent to which ephemeral river...

Data from: Seeds in motion: genetic assignment and hydrodynamic models demonstrate concordant patterns of seagrass dispersal

Elizabeth A. Sinclair, Leonardo Ruiz-Montoya, Siegfried L. Krauss, Janet M. Anthony, Renae K. Hovey, Ryan J. Lowe & Gary A. Kendrick
Movement is fundamental to the ecology and evolutionary dynamics within species. Understanding movement through seed dispersal in the marine environment can be difficult due to the high spatial and temporal variability of ocean currents. We employed a mutually enriching approach of population genetic assignment procedures and dispersal predictions from a hydrodynamic model to overcome this difficulty and quantify the movement of dispersing floating fruit of the temperate seagrass Posidonia australis Hook.f. across coastal waters in...

Data from: Soil types select for plants with matching nutrient‐acquisition and ‐use traits in hyperdiverse and severely nutrient‐impoverished campos rupestres and cerrado in Central Brazil

Anna Abrahão, Patrícia Costa, Hans Lambers, Sara Adrián L. De Andrade, Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland Sawaya, Megan H. Ryan & Rafael SIlva Oliveira
1. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie the generation of beta-diversity remains a challenge in ecology. Underground plant adaptations to environmental gradients have received relatively little attention. 2. We studied plant nutrient-acquisition strategies and nutrient-use efficiency at three stages of pedogenesis in infertile soils from campos rupestres and on less infertile soil from cerrado sensu stricto in Brazil. All soils support very high plant diversity with high species turnover between soil types at small spatial scales...

Data from: Morph-specific artificial selection reveals a constraint on the evolution of polyphenisms

Bruno A. Buzatto, Huon L. Clark & Joseph L. Tomkins
Theory predicts that the evolution of polyphenic variation is facilitated where morphs are genetically uncoupled and free to evolve towards their phenotypic optima. However, the assumption that developmentally plastic morphs can evolve independently has not been tested directly. Using morph-specific artificial selection, we investigated correlated evolution between the sexes and male morphs of the bulb mite Rhizoglyphus echinopus. Large ‘fighter’ males have a thick and sharply terminating pair of legs used to kill rival males,...

Data from: Multiple independent origins of intermediate species between Sorbus aucuparia and S. hybrida (Rosaceae) in the Baltic region

Joel Levin, Michael F. Fay, Jaume Pellicer & Mikael Hedrén
Populations intermediate between the diploid and sexual Sorbus aucuparia and the tetraploid and facultative apomictic Sorbus hybrida are scattered in coastal regions of southern Scandinavia. Our aims were to investigate whether these populations were of local and independent origins, whether they were morphologically and molecularly distinct from each other and whether they could give rise to constant offspring by apomixis. Six intermediate populations from the Baltic Sea basin were studied for variation at nuclear and...

Data from: The effect of uncertain bottom friction on estimates of tidal current power

Monika J. Kreitmair, Scott Draper, Alistair G.L. Borthwick & Ton S. Van Den Bremer
Uncertainty affects estimates of the power potential of tidal currents, resulting in large ranges in values reported for a given site, such as the Pentland Firth, UK. We examine the role of bottom friction, one of the most important sources of uncertainty. We do so by using perturbation methods to find the leading-order effect of bottom friction uncertainty in theoretical models by Garrett & Cummins (2005), Vennell (2010), and Garrett & Cummins (2013), which consider...

Data from: Social cues affect quantitative genetic variation and covariation in animal personality traits

Fabian Sandro Rudin, Leigh W. Simmons & Joseph L. Tomkins
The social environment is expected to have substantial effects on behavior, and as a consequence its heritability and evolvability. We investigated these effects by exposing Australian field crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus) to either silence or recordings of male acoustic sexual signals. We used a combined pedigree and full-sib/half-sib breeding design to estimate the repeatability, heritability, and evolvability of behaviors related to boldness, exploration, and activity. All behaviors measured were significantly repeatable in both social environments. Additionally,...

Data from: Seed moisture content as a primary trait regulating the lethal temperature thresholds of seeds.

Ryan Tangney, David J. Merritt, Joseph B. Fontaine & Ben P. Miller
1) Fire has shaped biological responses of plants and plant communities in fire-prone systems and is linked to myriad ecological processes but also frequently puts people and infrastructure at risk. Fuel or hazard-reduction burning is a common practice aimed at reducing the risk of high-severity fires, which ideally also incorporates consideration of biodiversity values. Within fire-prone systems, seed banks are often critical for plant species’ regeneration, and seeds are typically adapted to survive the passage...

Data from: Plasticity in root symbioses following shifts in soil nutrient availability during long-term ecosystem development

François P. Teste & Etienne Laliberté
1. The vast majority of terrestrial plants form root symbioses with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi to enhance nutrient (particularly phosphorus, P) acquisition, but some plant species also form dual symbioses involving ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, with a subset of those also forming triple symbioses also involving dinitrogen (N2)-fixing bacteria. Whether these plants show plasticity in root symbioses to optimise nutrient acquisition depending on the type and strength of soil nutrient limitation (e.g., N vs. P) has...

Data from: Climate change impacts on marine biodiversity, fisheries and society in the Arabian Gulf

Daniel Pauly, Myriam Khalfallah, Dalal Al-Abdulrazzak, Lydia C. L. Teh, Gabriel Reygondeau, Colette C. C. Wabnitz, Maria L. Deng Palomares, Dirk Zeller, William W. L. Cheung & Vicky W. Y. Lam
Climate change - reflected in significant environmental changes such as warming, sea level rise, shifts in salinity, oxygen and other ocean conditions - is expected to impact marine organisms and associated fisheries. This study provides an assessment of the potential impacts on, and the vulnerability of, marine biodiversity and fisheries catches in the Arabian Gulf under climate change. To this end, using three separate niche modelling approaches under a 'business-as-usual' climate change scenario, we projected...

Data from: Genome sequencing and analysis of the peanut b-genome progenitor (Arachis ipaensis)

Qing Lu, Haifen Li, Yanbin Hong, Guoqiang Zhang, Shijie Wen, Xingyu Li, Guiyuan Zhou, Shaoxiong Li, Hao Liu, Haiyan Liu, Zhongjian Liu, Rajeev K. Varshney, Xiaoping Chen & Xuanqiang Liang
Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), an important leguminous crop, is widely cultivated in tropical and subtropical regions. Peanut is an allotetraploid, having A and B subgenomes that maybe have originated in its diploid progenitors Arachis duranensis (A-genome) and Arachis ipaensis (B-genome), respectively. We previously sequenced the former and here present the draft genome of the latter, expanding our knowledge of the unique biology of Arachis. The assembled genome of A. ipaensis is ~1.39 Gb with 39,704...

Data from: Resistance of corals and coralline algae to ocean acidification: physiological control of calcification under natural pH variability

Christopher E. Cornwall, Steeve Comeau, Thomas M. DeCarlo, Billy Moore, Quentin D'Alexis & Malcolm T. McCulloch
Ocean acidification is a threat to the continued accretion of coral reefs, though some undergo daily fluctuations in pH exceeding declines predicted by 2100. We test whether exposure to greater pH variability enhances resistance to ocean acidification for the coral Goniopora sp. and coralline alga Hydrolithon reinboldii from two sites: one with low pH variability (< 0.15 units daily; Shell Island), and a site with high pH variability (up to 1.4 pH units daily; Tallon...

Data from: Effect of plant root symbionts on performance of native woody species in competition with an invasive grass in multispecies microcosms

Christina Birnbaum, Tim K. Morald, Mark Tibbett, Richard G. Bennett & Rachel J. Standish
The majority of terrestrial plants form mutualistic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and rhizobia (i.e. nitrogen fixing bacteria). Understanding these associations has important implications for ecological theory and for restoration practice. Here we tested whether the presence of AMF and rhizobia influence the performance of native woody plants invaded by a non-native grass in experimental microcosms. We planted eight plant species (i.e. Acacia acuminata, A. microbotrya, Eucalyptus loxophleba subsp. loxophleba, E. astringens, Calothamnus quadrifidus,...

Data from: Isolation and no-entry marine reserves mitigate anthropogenic impacts on grey reef shark behavior

Jean-Baptiste Juhel, Laurent Vigliola, Laurent Wantiez, Tom B. Letessier, Jessica J. Meeuwig & David Mouillot
Reef sharks are vulnerable predators experiencing severe population declines mainly due to overexploitation. However, beyond direct exploitation, human activities can produce indirect or sub-lethal effects such as behavioral alterations. Such alterations are well known for terrestrial fauna but poorly documented for marine species. Using an extensive sampling of 367 stereo baited underwater videos systems, we show modifications in grey reef shark (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) occurrence and feeding behavior along a marked gradient of isolation from humans...

Data from: Positive size-speed relationships in gametes and vegetative cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii; implications for the evolution of sperm.

Catherine Ellen Seed & Joseph L. Tomkins
It is commonly held that differences in gametes of the two sexes (anisogamy) evolved from ancestors whose gametes were similar in size and behaviour (isogamy). Underlying many hypotheses explaining anisogamy are assumed relationships between cell size and speed in the ancestral isogamous population. Using the isogamous alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we explored size-speed distributions in vegetative and gamete cells of ten cell lines, and clonal data from within two cell lines. We applied an independent speed...

Data from: Internal acoustic structuring in pied babbler recruitment cries specifies the form of recruitment

Sabrina Engesser, Amanda R Ridley, Marta B Manser, Andri Manser & Simon W Townsend
Language is inherently combinatorial, and parallels of this combinatorial capacity are found in nonhuman systems, with animals combining sounds and calls into larger meaningful structures. However, further analogue examples are central in unveiling the diversity, distribution, and evolutionary drivers of combinatoriality. Here, we provide evidence for internal “meaning-refining” acoustic variation within a larger stereotyped signal in pied babblers (Turdoides bicolor). Using acoustic analyses, we demonstrate that males produce 2 long, raucous, “cry-like” structures, both starting...

Data from: Macronutrients and micronutrients drive trade-offs between male pre- and post-mating sexual traits

Soon Hwee Ng, Stephen J. Simpson & Leigh W. Simmons
Nutrition fundamentally affects growth and reproduction, and identifying how nutrient intakes are linked to the expression of these life-history traits can advance understanding of the mechanisms underlying life history trade-offs. Males are thought to face trade-offs between the allocation of resources to pre-mating secondary sexual traits for gaining access to females and allocation to post-mating traits such as ejaculate quality that affects their fertility. We used the Geometric Framework for nutrition to examine the effects...

Data from: Effectiveness of camera traps for quantifying daytime and nighttime visitation by vertebrate pollinators

Siegfried L. Krauss, David G. Roberts, Ryan D. Phillips & Caroline Edwards
1. Identification of pollen vectors is a fundamental objective of pollination biology. The foraging and social behavior of these pollinators has profound effects on plant mating, making quantification of their behaviour critical for understanding the ecological and evolutionary consequences of different pollinators for the plants they visit. However, accurate quantification of visitation may be problematic, especially for shy animals and/or when the temporal and spatial scale of observation desired is large. Sophisticated heat- and movement-triggered...

Data from: Genetic diversity and drivers of dwarfism in extinct island emu populations

Vicki A. Thomson, Kieren J. Mitchell, Rolan Eberhard, Joe Dortch, Jeremy J. Austin & Alan Cooper
Australia’s iconic emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae novaehollandiae) is the only living representative of its genus, but fossil evidence and reports from early European explorers suggest that three island forms (at least two of which were dwarfs) became extinct during the 19th century. While one of these - the King Island emu - has been found to be conspecific with Australian mainland emus, little is known about how the other two forms - Kangaroo Island and Tasmanian...

Data from: The benefits of pair bond tenure in the cooperatively breeding pied babbler (Turdoides bicolor)

Elizabeth M. Wiley & Amanda R. Ridley
The benefits of stable pair bonds (that persist between breeding attempts) have been well described, but are relatively less well known in cooperatively breeding species. If pair bonds are beneficial, then it is possible that the bond between the behaviorally and socially dominant pair may influence factors such as reproductive success and group stability in cooperative species. Here we used long-term data to investigate the relationships between pair bond tenure, reproductive success and group stability...

Data from: Going to extremes for sodium acquisition: use of community land and high-altitude areas by mountain gorillas Gorilla beringei in Rwanda

Cyril C. Grueter, Edward Wright, Didier Abavandimwe, Sylvia Ortmann, Antoine Mudakikwa, Abel Musana, Propser Uwingeli, Felix Ndagijimana, Veronica Vecellio, Tara S. Stoinski & Martha M. Robbins
Space use in mammals may be influenced not only by their primary foods, but also by localized sources of physiologically critical resources such as sodium-rich plants. We examined how sodium acquisition influences habitat use in mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei) in Rwanda which have increased the amount of time they forage on community land outside of Volcanoes National Park (VNP), where eucalyptus (Eucalyptus spp.) tree bark is their most frequently eaten food. We measured sodium content...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    44

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    44

Affiliations

  • University of Western Australia
    44
  • Australian National University
    3
  • University of Cape Town
    3
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    3
  • Department of Parks and Wildlife
    3
  • Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment
    2
  • Murdoch University
    2
  • Royal Botanic Gardens
    2
  • Macquarie University
    2
  • Curtin University
    2