12 Works

Data from: Differences in patterns of reproductive allocation between the sexes in Nicrophorus orbicollis

Ashlee N. Smith, J. Curtis Creighton & Mark C. Belk
Organisms are selected to maximize lifetime reproductive success by balancing the costs of current reproduction with costs to future survival and fecundity. Males and females typically face different reproductive costs, which makes comparisons of their reproductive strategies difficult. Burying beetles provide a unique system that allows us to compare the costs of reproduction between the sexes because males and females are capable of raising offspring together or alone and carcass preparation and offspring care represent...

Data from: Divergent natural selection promotes immigrant inviability at early and late stages of evolutionary divergence

Jerald B. Johnson & Spencer J. Ingley
Natural selection's role in speciation has been of fundamental importance since Darwin first outlined his theory. Recently, work has focused on understanding how selection drives trait divergence, and subsequently reproductive isolation. ‘Immigrant inviability’, a barrier that arises from selection against immigrants in their non-native environment, appears to be of particular importance. Although immigrant inviability is likely ubiquitous, we know relatively little about how selection acts on traits to drive immigrant inviability, and how important immigrant...

Data from: Opsins have evolved under the permanent heterozygote model: insights from phylotranscriptomics of Odonata

Anton Suvorov, Nicholas O. Jensen, Camilla R. Sharkey, M. Stanley Fujimoto, Paul Bodily, Haley M. Cahill Wightman, T. Heath Ogden, Mark J. Clement & Seth M. Bybee
Gene duplication plays a central role in adaptation to novel environments by providing new genetic material for functional divergence and evolution of biological complexity. Several evolutionary models have been proposed for gene duplication to explain how new gene copies are preserved by natural selection, but these models have rarely been tested using empirical data. Opsin proteins, when combined with a chromophore, form a photopigment that is responsible for the absorption of light, the first step...

Data from: A cure for the blues: opsin duplication and subfunctionalization for short-wavelength sensitivity in jewel beetles (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

Nathan P. Lord, Rebecca L. Plimpton, Camilla R. Sharkey, Anton Suvorov, Jonathan P. Lelito, Barry M. Willardson & Seth M. Bybee
Background: Arthropods have received much attention as a model for studying opsin evolution in invertebrates. Yet, relatively few studies have investigated the diversity of opsin proteins that underlie spectral sensitivity of the visual pigments within the diverse beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera). Previous work has demonstrated that beetles appear to lack the short-wavelength-sensitive (SWS) opsin class that typically confers sensitivity to the “blue” region of the light spectrum. However, this is contrary to established physiological data in...

Data from: Phylogeography and species delimitation in convict cichlids (Cichlidae: Amatitlania): implications for taxonomy and Plio–Pleistocene evolutionary history in Central America

Justin C. Bagley, Wilfredo A. Matamoros, Caleb D. McMahan, Michael Tobler, Prosanta Chakrabarty & Jerald B. Johnson
We investigate phylogeographic patterns and delimit species boundaries within Amatitlania, a genus of Central American cichlid fishes. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequences from 318 individuals spanning the geographical ranges of all three currently recognized Amatitlania species strongly supported one major clade, with a relatively diverged subclade corresponding to A. kanna samples from eastern Costa Rica and Panama. Gene trees and networks revealed marked incongruences between phylogeographic structure and morpho-species taxonomy as a result of...

Data from: Limitations of species delimitation based on phylogenetic analyses: a case study in the (Hypogymnia hypotrypa) group (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycota)

Xinli Wei, Bruce McCune, H. Thorsten Lumbsch, Hui Li, Steven Leavitt, Yoshikazu Yamamoto, Svetlana Tchabanenko & Jiangchun Wei
Delimiting species boundaries among closely related lineages often requires a range of independent data sets and analytical approaches. Similar to other organismal groups, robust species circumscriptions in fungi are increasingly investigated within an empirical framework. Here we attempt to delimit species boundaries in a closely related clade of lichen-forming fungi endemic to Asia, the Hypogymnia hypotrypa group (Parmeliaceae). In the current classification, the Hypogymnia hypotrypa group includes two species: H. hypotrypa and H. flavida, which...

Data from: A gene for genetic background in Zea mays: fine-mapping enhancer of teosinte branched1.2 to a YABBY class transcription factor

Chin Jian Yang, Lisa E. Kursel, Anthony J. Studer, Madelaine E. Bartlett, Clinton J. Whipple & John F. Doebley
The effects of an allelic substitution at a gene often depend critically on genetic background, i.e., the genotypes at other genes in the genome. During the domestication of maize from its wild ancestor (teosinte), an allelic substitution at teosinte branched (tb1) caused changes in both plant and ear architecture. The effects of tb1 on phenotype were shown to depend on multiple background loci, including one called enhancer of tb1.2 (etb1.2). We mapped etb1.2 to a...

Data from: Climate drives adaptive genetic responses associated with survival in big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata)

Lindsay Chaney, Bryce A. Richardson & Matthew J. Germino
A genecological approach was used to explore genetic variation for survival in Artemisia tridentata (big sagebrush). Artemisia tridentata is a widespread and foundational shrub species in western North America. This species has become extremely fragmented, to the detriment of dependent wildlife, and efforts to restore it are now a land management priority. Common garden experiments were established at three sites with seedlings from 55 source-populations. Populations included each of the three predominant subspecies, and cytotype...

Data from: Archipelago-wide survey of Philippine forest dragons (Agamidae: Gonocephalus): multilocus phylogeny uncovers unprecedented levels of genetic diversity in a biodiversity hotspot

Luke J. Welton, Cameron D. Siler, L. L. Grismer, Arvin C. Diesmos, Jack W. Sites & Rafe M. Brown
We utilize robust geographical genetic sampling, a multilocus dataset, and coalescent-based species delimitation statistics to provide the first phylogenetic inferences of relationships of Philippine Gonocephalus, combined with estimates of putative species diversity in this virtually unknown island radiation. Our results reveal startling levels of undocumented diversity, genetically partitioned at a number of geographic levels across the archipelago. In this paper we present the first survey of genetic lineage diversity, coupled with an archipelago-wide elucidation of...

Data from: Taxonomic resolution is a determinant of biodiversity effects in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities

Haishui Yang, Qian Zhang, Roger T. Koide, Jason D. Hoeksema, Jianjun Tang, Xinmin Bian, Shuijin Hu & Xin Chen
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are key regulators of ecosystem processes, yet how their biodiversity works in ecosystems remains poorly understood. We documented the extent to which taxonomic resolution influenced the effect of biodiversity of AMF taxa on plant performance (growth, nutrient uptake and stress tolerance) in a meta-analysis of 902 articles. We found that the effect of biodiversity of AMF taxa depended on taxonomic resolution. Plant performance was positively promoted by AMF family richness, while...

Data from: MycoDB, a global database of plant response to mycorrhizal fungi

V. Bala Chaudhary, Megan A. Rúa, Anita Antoninka, James D. Bever, Jeffery Cannon, Ashley Craig, Jessica Duchicela, Alicia Frame, Monique Gardes, Catherine Gehring, Michelle Ha, Miranda Hart, Jacob Hopkins, Baoming Ji, Nancy Collins Johnson, Wittaya Kaonongbua, Justine Karst, Roger T. Koide, Louis J. Lamit, James Meadow, Brook G. Milligan, John C. Moore, , Bridget Piculell, Blake Ramsby … & Jason D. Hoeksema
Plants form belowground associations with mycorrhizal fungi in one of the most common symbioses on Earth. However, few large-scale generalizations exist for the structure and function of mycorrhizal symbioses, as the nature of this relationship varies from mutualistic to parasitic and is largely context-dependent. We announce the public release of MycoDB, a database of 4,010 studies (from 438 unique publications) to aid in multi-factor meta-analyses elucidating the ecological and evolutionary context in which mycorrhizal fungi...

Data from: Selection is stronger in early-versus-late stages of divergence in a Neotropical livebearing fish

Spencer J. Ingley & Jerald B. Johnson
How selection acts to drive trait evolution at different stages of divergence is of fundamental importance in our understanding of the origins of biodiversity. Yet, most studies have focused on a single point along an evolutionary trajectory. Here, we provide a case study evaluating the strength of divergent selection acting on life-history traits at early-versus-late stages of divergence in Brachyrhaphis fishes. We find that the difference in selection is stronger in the early-diverged population than...

Registration Year

  • 2016
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  • Brigham Young University
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  • University of Kansas
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  • Field Museum of Natural History
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  • National Museum
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  • King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi
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  • California State University, Northridge
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  • Zhejiang University
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  • New Mexico State University
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